Canadians here for fuel, iron ore pellets

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Above, Holly caught the Algosteel coming under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge yesterday (October 10, 2017). She first went to Calumet for fuel and then to CN to load iron ore pellets. She left last night at 10:50. Below, the Whitefish Bay arrived last night at 7:25, got fuel at Calumet and then went down (up?) the Superior Channel to go out to the anchorage to wait for the Algoma Guardian to finish loading iron ore pellets at the BNSF dock.
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Old year and Happy New year

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I am not a big fan of the ‘Christmas tree’ you see in the middle of the picture above rising up in front of the Frontenac as she came into port on Saturday morning, December 31, 2016. The lights are out at Bentleyville for another year, and soon, I hope, the tree will be gone. By then most of the vessel traffic will be over, but I will patiently wait for the new season, when the leaves will return to the trees, the branches of which are now visible framing my picture. But I am not complaining.  Below, is an unobstructed view of the Frontenac but by then, the sun was not a big help to my picture, but I am not complaining. Most should be so lucky to have Christmas trees, leaves and the sun to worry about.
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The Frontenac was here to load iron ore pellets at the CN in West Duluth. She departed, this morning at 5:00 (above). Below, the Whitefish Bay departed the port this morning, January 1, 2017, after discharging a cargo of salt at the Hallett #8 dock in Superior. I think she left here on her way to load iron ore pellets at the BN.
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With the Western end of Lake Superior available for parking this afternoon, the Paul R. Tregurtha sat just behind the American Integrity above, at the right, and below, a little closer. They were I think both waiting to load iron ore pellets at Two Harbors. But it is dark outside and AIS is still recovering  from New Years Eve, as I guess are all my usual sources. So I will go home and watch the last football game of the regular season.2017-0101-0603

New Whitefish Bay Pictures

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Clear and cold

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The Whitefish Bay arrived Duluth at noon on Monday, January 5, 2015 to get fuel at Calumet before moving over to the Burlington Northern to load iron ore pellets. The North Carolina was waiting at the bridge for the Whitefish Bay to arrived before she went out into the lake.

3 again and still 1 more and then the Mac

The Mackinaw led a convoy of boats that arrived off the Duluth piers this morning (April 30, 2014).  Before they came in, the CSL Assiniboine departed around 8:25 morning and ran into some ice problems. The bad news; there were 7 boats in front of her waiting to come in. The good news: the Mackinaw was right there and after a couple hours of working the ice, the Assiniboine was on her way. The first three were the CSL Assiniboine, Cason J. Callaway and the Thunder Bay.
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Half an hour later, the Whitefish Bay came in, followed by the Baie Comeau and then the CSL Tadoussac.
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After the Bridge went down to clear some traffic, the Baie St. Paul came in alone. A little later, the Mackinaw, having watched her charges safely make it into the Duluth harbor, came in herself.
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Aboard the Whitefish Bay in Duluth

Welcome to the Whitefish Bay

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The Whitefish Bay arrived late last night, her first cargo trip since she arrived in Montreal on July 7 from the Chengxi Shipyard in Jiangyin, China where she was built. She then left for Duluth to load coal at Midwest Energy (above). Captain Kent Powell brought his crew of 15 to Duluth. She is the second of four new Trillium Class Lakers that Canada Steamship Lines is building for Great Lakes service. The other three vessels are the Baie St. Paul, the Thunder Bay and the Baie Comeau.
The Whitefish Bay has the latest engine technology to decrease air emissions and a double hull design to prevent spills. New cargo handling will minimize dust and cargo residue.
triliumThe name Trillium comes from the beautiful spring flower of the same name. The three petals represent for CSL, the three tenets of CSL’s sustainability philosophy as well as the three areas in which the new vessels excel: fuel efficiency, operational performance and environmental sustainability.
CSL named the new boat after a ship with the same name that was built in 1961. The name also comes from the Bay class of ships the company had that honored the many Bays in the Great Lakes.
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The Whitefish Bay finally departed Duluth Saturday afternoon, July 26, 2013, delighting a large crowd that took a break from the Tall Ships to check out our brand new visitor.
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