Blacky and Trudy slowed by rain

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The Blacky arrived Duluth on May 14, 2017 to load wheat at Riverside Ag (above). She departed 5 days later, on May 19, for the port of Cadiz in Spain. The Blacky is owned by Navarone Marine Enterprises on Cyprus and is on long term charter to Canadian Forest Navigation (Canfornav), headquartered in Montreal. They operate a fleet of over 40 ocean-going vessels that they use to connect Great Lakes ports to the rest of the world. Many of their ships are named for ducks, such as Bluebill, Chestnut, Maccoa, Mottler, Ruddy, and Tufty.  Most have been to Duluth on several occasions.

Trudy arrived Duluth on May 12 to discharge kaolin clay at the Port Terminal. She also left 7 days later, on May 19 (below). Both were handling bulk cargo that is not usually moved when it is raining, as it was in Duluth this past week, delaying both ships.

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Clay and limestone in; coal and iron ore pellets out

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Above, after arriving Duluth under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge at 8:45 this morning (June 02, 2016), the Paul R. Tregurtha stopped by the Calumet Fuel dock for fuel before going to Midwest Energy Resources to load 66,000 tons of coal for Detroit Edison. In front of her, the Trudy is still discharging a cargo of clay at the Port Terminal. Just below, the Cason J. Callaway arrived Duluth at 11:25 this morning with limestone. Twenty five minutes later, she passes by the two vessels at the Port Terminal on her way to discharge her cargo at the C. Reiss Dock before moving over to the CN dock to load iron ore pellets. Ten minutes later (below), the Tregurtha moves away from the dock to make the short trip up the St. Louis River to the Midwest Energy dock.
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Both the Kurt Paul and the Trudy here for second time to discharge general cargo

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The Kurt Paul, above, arrived on Saturday and went to anchor off the Duluth piers. This morning (May 29, 2016) at 6:14, she came into port and is now discharging wind turbine blades at the Port Terminal.  She was here once before, in May, 2011, also discharging wind turbine blades. She is expected to complete that discharge and depart the port this evening. Below, the Trudy arrived here on May 24 and has been discharging clay at the Port Terminal. She also was here once before; in November, 2015 when she also discharged clay. That job will take a holiday on Monday (Memorial Day) and resume on Tuesday, hoping to complete the discharge late next week.
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