Philip R. Clarke brings limestone from Calcite, Michigan

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The Philip R. Clarke loaded limestone in Calcite, Michigan and is expected here today to discharge part of that cargo at the Hallett #8 Dock in Superior before moving across the St. Louis River to discharge the rest of the limestone at the CN Dock in West Duluth. That completed, it will load taconite pellets at the CN Dock and then depart Duluth for Conneaut, Ohio. Above, the Clarke arrives in Duluth last October. The Clarke was the first of 8 boats built in the early 50’s that are called AAA class vessels. The boat has been updated several times over its life, including one change that added 120 feet to the length of the boat.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/19/2007

Philip R. Clarke a regular visitor to Twin Ports

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The Philip R. Clarke is expected in port this evening with a cargo of limestone loaded at Calcite, Michigan. When that discharge is complete, it will go to the Burlington Northern dock in Superior to load taconite for Detroit. The Clarke was the first of 8 boats built in the early 50’s that are called AAA class vessels. The boat has been updated several times over its life, including one change that added 120 feet to the length of the boat. This is the Clarke’s 12 visit here this season. It came here 13 times last year, and 12 the year before that.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 10-24-2006

Philip R. Clarke

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The Philip R. Clarke is coming to Duluth today to discharge a cargo of limestone. They will likely stop for fuel first. That completed, they will move to Two Harbors to load taconite. Recent ports of call for the Clarke have included Stoneport, Calcite, Cedarville/Port Dolomite and Zug Island in Michigan, Buffington in Indiana, Conneaut in Ohio, Green Bay in Wisconsin, South Chicago in Illinois, Gary in Indiana and Meldrum Bay in Ontario. And of course, Two Harbors and Duluth/Superior. Above, the Clarke spent the winter layup between 2002 and 2003 at the Port Terminal.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-02-2006

Philip R. Clarke gets repairs

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The James R. Barker has the center stage for boat traffic here for the next week. It left last night for Taconite Harbor and is due back Friday. The Philip R. Clarke spent the winter in Duluth and is getting ready for the new season. Last week, Jack Gartner, above left, who heads up Gartner Refrigeration in Duluth, was on the Philip R. Clarke working on a problem with the refrigeration unit. He was assisted by Brad Emerson, above right, also from Gartner Refrigeration.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 03-15-2006

Philip R. Clarke

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The Philip R. Clarke was the first of 8 boats built in the early 50’s that are referred to as the AAA class vessels. Several major structural changes over the years, including one change that added 120 feet to the length of the boat, have kept the Clarke operating on the Great Lakes. The Clarke will be here to discharge limestone it loaded at Calcite, Michigan.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 11-03-2005

Clarke brings limestone

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The Philip R. Clarke is bringing limestone in today from Cedarville and Port Dolomite, both in Michigan. That is the boat’s usual incoming cargo. On most trips, it loads taconite to take out, often for Detroit, Michigan. This is her 10th trip here this season.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 09-06-2005

Philip R. Clarke

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The Philip R. Clarke was the first of 8 boats built in the early 50’s that are referred to as the AAA class vessels. Several major structural changes over the years, including one change that added 120 feet to the length of the boat, have kept the Clarke operating on the Great Lakes.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-20-2005

Philip R. Clarke

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The Philip R. Clarke was built in 1952 for the Pittsburgh Steamship Company. Several upgrades have extended the useful life of the Clarke. It was lengthened by 120 feet in 1974 and is now 767 feet long. A 262 foot self unloader was installed in 1982.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-04-2005

Philip R. Clarke is AAA

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The Philip R. Clarke was the first of 8 boats built in the early 50’s that are referred to as the AAA class vessels. Several major structural changes over the years, including one change that added 120 feet to the length, have kept the Clarke and most of the other AAA boats, still operating on the Great Lakes.The Clarke was built for the Pittsburgh Steamship Company in 1952.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-31-2004

Clarke discharges limestone

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The Philip R. Clarke is in the port for the 9th time this year. It usually discharges limestone as it is doing today. It has loaded taconite at Burlington Northern on several trips. On other trips, as today, it goes to Two Harbors to load taconite for lower lakes ports.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-14-2004

Clarke built in 1952

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The Philip R. Clarke was built in 1952 for the Pittsburgh Steamship Company. Several upgrades have allowed the Clarke to keep working the Great Lakes. She was lengthened by 120 feet in 1974 and is now 767 feet long. A bow-thruster was added in 1966 and a stern-thruster was installed in 1988. A 262 foot self unloader was installed in 1982. Photo taken October 21, 2001.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-02-2004