Halifax approaching Aerial Lift Bridge

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The Canadian flagged Halifax, seen above arriving on May 27th, 2002, was expected to arrive very early this morning to load bentonite at the Hallett Dock in West Duluth. This is the 9th trip here this season for the Halifax, the second time it has loaded bentonite. It loaded iron ore pellets on the other 7 trips. It was built in 1963 as the Frankcliffe Hall and was 2 inches over 730 feet. The extra two inches made it, until 1965, the longest boat on the Great Lakes, the last steam powered vessel on the Great Lakes to hold the title.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 11-16-2008

Halifax makes trail through ice

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There is significant boat traffic scheduled for today but the weather may be more significant. High winds could effect all shipping activity in the port. Coal and taconite can be loaded in rain, but sometimes equipment cannot be operated in high winds and they can make it difficult to tie up to a dock. Salt water ships will have trouble loading grain. That doesn’t happen in the rain. The Whistler got out last night with a cargo of grain, but the Federal Weser, Kamenitza and the BBC Elbe will probably be delayed. The Beluga Efficiency has been discharging wind turbine parts before loading grain. Neither activity goes well in high wind. The Halifax was expected earlier this morning. Above, it is coming into port last March, not at all bothered by the cold weather and ice. Photo taken on March 24, 2007. [Halifax was scrapped in 2011.]
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 10-18-2007

Halifax arriving Duluth

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The salt water ship Federal Pioneer should have departed Duluth by now after loading bentonite at the Hallett Dock in West Duluth. The Canadian flagged Halifax was set to follow it at Hallett, also loading bentonite, a clay that is used as an adhesive in making ceramic items and an additive mixed with cement. The Halifax was built as the Frankcliffe Hall in 1963 in Quebec. It’s length, 730 feet and two inches, made it the longest boat on the Great Lakes for two years. That distinction gave it the title of Queen of the Lakes. A self unloader was added to the deck in 1980. A sister ship, the Baie St. Paul, without that addition, was scrapped in India in 1996. [Halifax was scrapped in 2011].
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-22-2007

Halifax approaches Aerial Lift Bridge

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The Canadian flagged Halifax will be here today to load taconite. It was built in 1963 in Lauzon, Quebec as the Frankcliffe Hall and is 730 feet and two inches long. The ‘extra’ two inches made it the longest boat on the Great Lakes, a distinction that lasted until 1965. It is the last steam powered boat in the Canada Steamship fleet and is named for the capital of Nova Scotia. A self unloader was added to the deck in 1980 that has given it a longer life. A sister ship, the Baie St. Paul, without that addition, was scrapped in India in 1996. Photo taken May 27, 2002. [Halifax was scrapped in June of 2011]
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 10-04-2006

Halifax enters Duluth ship canal

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The Canadian flagged Halifax will be here this afternoon to discharge sand. It was built in 1963 in Lauzon, Quebec as the Frankcliffe Hall. It was 730 feet and two inches long. The ‘extra’ two inches made it the longest boat on the Great Lakes, a distinction that lasted until 1965. It is the last steam powered boat in the Canada Steamship fleet and is named for the capital of Nova Scotia. It is bright red.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-24-2006