Gott will be first boat to move in season 2016

After spending the winter layup in Duluth, the Edwin H. Gott is expected to open the Great Lakes shipping season for Duluth when she departs the port early on Tuesday morning, March 22, 2016, for Two Harbors to load iron ore pellets. With no ice to battle this season, she should not need any assistance from an ice breaking tug or the Alder to leave her berth and go to Two Harbors. Not so last season. She was originally scheduled to arrive here last January, 2015 for winter layup but her plans were changed and she spent the winter in Milwaukee. She left Milwaukee last March to load her first cargo of the new season in Two Harbors but became one of many boats to be slowed to a stop by the ice in Whitefish Bay, at the other end of Lake Superior. With help from ice breakers Alder and Mackinaw, she finally arrived at this end of the lake, coming under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge on Monday morning, March 30, 2015 for some repairs before leaving here (below) for Two Harbors the next day to load her first iron ore pellets of the year in Two Harbors.
2015-0331-621

Gott, Kaye E. Barker arrive for winter layup

 2016-0115-5630
The Kaye E. Barker came in for winter layup at about 12:30 this afternoon (Friday, January 15, 2016). She will spend her winter at Fraser Shipyards. This was her 5th trip here this season; last year she was here 2 times. The Edwin H. Gott came in on January 14th for winter layup at the Port Authority (below). She was here 3 times this season, the same number of trips she made last year.
2016-0114-5624

Gott and Cort arrive under Lift Bridge

2015-0410-737
The Edwin H. Gott arrived Duluth (above) on Friday morning, April 10, 2015 to load iron ore pellets at the CN dock in West Duluth. She was originally scheduled to spend winter layup in Duluth but spent layup in Milwaukee instead. Although owned and operated by Great Lakes Fleet, headquartered in Duluth, she was only here 3 times last year. She spends most of her season loading iron ore pellets in Two Harbors and taking them to Gary. Earlier this  week, the Stewart J. Cort came under the Lift Bridge (left) to get fuel at 2015-0403-716the  Calumet fuel dock at the Port Terminal before going to the BNSF Dock in Superior to load iron ore pellets. That has been her destination for many many years, and since the BNSF is just inside the Superior entry, we seldom see her coming under the Lift Bridge.

Gott goes to Two Harbors

2015-0331-620
After battling the ice in Whitefish Bay, at the other end of Lake Superior,  and with the considerable help of the Alder and the Mackinaw, the Edwin H. Gott, finally arrived back in the bright blue waters off the port of Duluth, coming under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge on Monday morning, March 30, 2015. After getting some maintenance at the listenwhistlebarblue-2Port Terminal, she departed for Two Harbors to pick up a cargo of iron ore pellets on Tuesday afternoon, March 31 (above and below). Listen as she salutes the bridge while going out to the lake.
2015-0331-639
2015-0331-658

Nick gets two, three times, in Two Harbors

Nick Stenstrup took the three pictures below, the first this past December and the two below that last July. He tells us what he saw below.
mccarthyboland-nick-20121222_7248
On December 22, 2012, the Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. loaded iron ore pellets at the CN conveyor dock in Two Harbors while the John J. Boland waited on the other side. I took this picture and the two below from the Two Harbors break wall.
nickindharbjackman07012012
On July 1, 2012, the Capt. Henry Jackman loaded iron ore pellets at the conveyor dock while the Indiana Harbor waited.
gotcallaway07022012-nick-053
The next day, I caught the Edwin H. Gott loading iron ore pellets at the conveyor dock while the Cason J. Callaway waited to do the same.

Edwin H. Gott at Port Terminal for winter layup

edwinhgott20120213_0425
The Edwin H. Gott was the last freighter to come home for winter layup, coming under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge at 7:45 am on January 18, 2012

Edwin H. Gott, last to come in for the winter

edwingottnelsj20120118_0372
Nice for the boats; winter arrived here within minutes of the Heritage Marine tug Nels J making sure the last boat to come in, the Edwin H. Gott, was secure against the dock at the Port Terminal on Wednesday morning, January 18, 2012. The temperature plunged, down to -31 at my home, and a big snow storm, the largest we have had yet, at least ¾ of an inch, maybe even 1/8 more. The Alder was close by but was not needed, so she went back to her dock, probably not moving from there until March 7th or so.

Mesabi Miner here for the winter

mesabiminer20120117_0368
The Edwin H. Gott will be the last boat to come in for winter layup. This morning (January 17, 2012), the Mesabi Miner (above) arrived here after delivering her last cargo of the season in Taconite Harbor. She will spend the winter at the Midwest Energy Resources coal dock in Superior. That will make it real convenient to start the 2012 season in only two more months. She will likely load more coal for a port within Lake Superior, before the Soo Locks open (usually around March 25th). The Miner may get two  coal deliveries done by then. See video below.

Last trip out for the Gott

edwinhgott20120112_0347
The Edwin H. Gott arrived in Port on Wednesday evening, January 11, 2012 at 6:50 to load iron ore pellets at the CN dock in West Duluth. She left Duluth around noon today (above) to deliver her cargo to Detroit. She will return in about a week for winter layup in Duluth. Listen as she sounded a particularly strong salute to the bridge.

Schnabel-Gott

schnaublegott20120104_0136
The Edwin H. Gott (background), the most powerful vessel on the Great Lakes, arrived this morning (January 4, 2012) at 7:11. She is here to load fuel and then go over to Burlington Northern to load iron ore pellets. The Schnabel car (foreground) has been in the Twin Ports for several years. She is the largest rail car in the world and will also be leaving Duluth late  this morning, to go over to the BN rail yard where she will be connected to a BN train that will take her to New Castle, Pennsylvania for some minor additions to the car before leaving for some big hauling work in Georgia in the nuclear power industry, the industry she was originally built for in Germany in 1980. More information about the Schnabel car, click here

Gott here for only 2nd time this season

edwinhgott20111030_6352
The Edwin H. Gott was in Duluth today (October 30, 2011) for only the second time this season. She loaded iron ore pellets at the CN dock in West Duluth and is seen (and heard) here leaving to take her cargo to Conneaut, Ohio. While she often takes iron ore pellets to Conneaut, this season has seen her going to Gary, Indiana more often. She almost always loads in Two Harbors. Listen to her whistle as she came under the Lift Bridge.

Gott and Spirit working off the Duluth piers

American Spirit discharges iron ore pellets into Edwin H. Gott
Took this picture at 4:15 in the afternoon, July 29, 2011. The American Spirit and the Edwin H. Gott are off the Duluth piers, where this shot was taken, The American Spirit is the boat facing left; the Gott faces right. It appears that the American Spirit is discharging cargo into a Gott cargo hold.

Gott goes under the Aerial Lift Bridge

edwinhgott20090624_8154
The Edwin H. Gott came under the Lift Bridge around 5 pm on Wednesday to first get fuel at the Murphy Fuel dock at the Port Terminal and then move down to the BN dock to load iron ore pellets for Gary. The thousand foot long Gott will be joined by 3 more thousand footers today. Actually the Paul R. Tregurtha has been here for repairs but was expected to begin loading coal last night and will likely depart this morning. The Presque Isle is expected here this morning to load iron ore pellets, and later today, the Indiana Harbor will be here to load coal. Photo taken on June 24, 2009
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-25-2009

Edwin H. Gott gets lots of attention

edwinhgott20090617_7345
Five thousand footers will be here today. One of them, the Edwin H. Gott, came in last night around 6 pm (above). The Gott went to get fuel at the Murphy Fuel Dock in Duluth before heading over to the Burlington Northern dock in Superior to load iron ore pellets for Conneaut, Ohio. The Gott should be finishing up and departing through the Superior entry around 4 am. Just after that, two more thousand footers, the Paul R. Tregurtha and the tug/barge combination Presque Isle, should be arriving by way of the Duluth ship canal, and the American Century should be finishing up at Midwest Energy Resources loading coal. It will then depart, clearing the dock for the Tregurtha. Photo taken on June 17, 2009
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-18-2009

Alder out breaking ice

I had a chance to take a ride of the Alder this morning, but I had to tell them I was too busy taking pictures of them. Here, she is coming right at me with the Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. on her right and the Edwin H. Gott on her left. The McCarthy is due to depart with coal on Tuesday; the Gott may leave with iron ore pellets on Thursday.
alder ken

Gott getting turned in Duluth harbor

edwinhgott20070910_2640
I made an assumption yesterday that so far will be wrong. I said that since the James R. Barker will be spending the winter at the Midwest Energy Resources coal dock, it would be the last boat to arrive for winter lay up. That is the way it has usually gone. However, the Canadian Enterprise still wants coal and is now scheduled to arrive in port to load that coal on Sunday, while the Barker is due back on Thursday. Selling coal trumps spending the winter resting, so the Barker will likely find a spot to wait at the Port Terminal for the Enterprise to finish before moving over to Midwest. The Enterprise will then pick up the award as both the last arrival and departure of the season. One more assumption based on past experience. The Barker will be the first boat to load coal at Midwest Energy in March when the new season opens. No traffic here today but Two Harbors is hosting Edwin (H. Gott) and Edgar (B. Speer), both loading iron ore pellets. Above the Gott is seen entering the harbor on September 10, 2007.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 01-06-2009

Edwin H. Gott arrives Duluth

edwinhgott20070910_2640
The Edwin H. Gott came into port Wednesday morning. The Canadian Transport, the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and the Herbert C. Jackson came in or were expected in last night. There are no arrivals set for today but all four of those boats, plus the research vessel Blue Heron, will be departing today. The Gott is loading iron ore pellets, as it usually does and is part of a year-to-date 9.8% increase in Great Lakes iron ore shipments from last year. It is seen above entering the Duluth harbor last September. Photo taken on September 10, 2007
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 10-23-2008

Gott making the turn in Duluth harbor

edwinhgott20070910_2640
No coal will be loaded into boats in the Twin Ports today nor any grain. No wind turbines will be discharged either. No Canadian boats will be in either Duluth, Superior, Two Harbors or Silver Bay. That leaves US flagged boats loading iron ore pellets. And they will be doing that in each of those ports today. Duluth gets the Edwin H. Gott. It left Two Harbors last Sunday with iron ore pellets for Gary. It will be back for more pellets for Gary today, this time loading from the CN dock in West Duluth. Above, the Edwin H. Gott turns into the Duluth harbor after coming under the Lift Bridge in September, last year. Photo taken on September 10, 2007
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 09-22-2008

Edwin H. Gott got the blues

edgottblues2008Aug10_9812
The Edwin H. Gott arrived under the Lift Bridge as Mike Zito was on stage leaning into his guitar at the Bayfront Blues Festival on Sunday afternoon. The Gott came in for some blues and some gas before loading up on iron ore pellets at the BNSF dock in Superior. Those will go to steel mills in Toledo. Photo taken on August 10,2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-11-2008

Edwin H. Gott making turn in harbor

edwinhgott20070910_2640
Duluth sent and will receive the last two boats to go through the Soo Locks in each direction this year before they closed for the winter. The Michipicoten departed here with taconite at 1:40 Monday afternoon. It arrived at the Soo Locks and went through at 11:10 Tuesday night. In the other direction, the Edwin H. Gott, seen above entering the Duluth harbor in September last year, cleared the locks Tuesday evening and was expected here very early this morning. Earlier in the week, the John G. Munson loaded iron ore in Marquette for Algoma Steel on this side of the locks. It was expected to depart there for Duluth and winter lay up early Wednesday morning. Photo taken on September 10, 2007
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 01-17-2008

Gott got into port yesterday

edwinhgott20070910_2640
The American Mariner is expected to be here today to load taconite at the CN dock in West Duluth. That cargo will go to the Mittal Steel plant in Indiana Harbor. Yesterday, the salt water ship Utviken was loading taconite at the BN dock in Superior for Mittal Steel in Algeria. Last week, the American Mariner was here to load taconite at the BN dock in Superior for Zug Island, near Detroit. Today will be the 15th trip the American Mariner has made here this year. Last year, it was here 33 times. Above, the Edwin H. Gott came into port on Monday morning. Photo taken on September 10, 2007.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 09-11-2007

Edwin H. Gott at last winter’s layup

edwinhgott270114-1-164
After discharging taconite in Gary, the Edwin H. Gott should be here this morning to load taconite for Nanticoke. This is only the Gott’s 7th trip to the Twin Ports this season; last year, it was here 11 times to load cargo. It uses the Two Harbors dock more often when it is on Lake Superior loading taconite for lower lakes ports. However, as this past winter (above), the 1,000-footer often spends the winter layup in Duluth.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 09-10-2007

Edwin H. Gott at winter layup

edwinhgott270114-1-164
The Edwin H. Gott is expected here this morning to load taconite at the CN dock in West Duluth for Nanticoke, Ontario. Although it spent the winter in Duluth at the Port Terminal (above), until today the Gott has only been back two other times this season. Most of the time, the Gott has been loading taconite at Two Harbors for Gary, Indiana with some trips, as today, taking taconite to Nanticoke. The Gott is the most powerful boat on the Great Lakes, generating 19,500 hp with two diesel engines. Built in 1979 at Sturgeon Bay, it was named for the president of the United States Steel Company from 1967 to 1969. Photo taken January 14, 2007.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-10-2007

Edwin H. Gott entering Duluth ship canal

edwingott2611191-007
The Edwin H. Gott is expected here this afternoon to load taconite at the CN dock in West Duluth. This is only the 2nd time we have seen it this year in the Twin Ports. Usually it loads taconite at the CN dock in Two Harbors and takes it down to Gary. Above, it is entering the Duluth ship canal in November, last year. The Great Lakes Maritime Academy’s training ship, the State of Michigan, should have arrived earlier this morning. It left it’s home port of Traverse City, Michigan on May 12 for a two week training cruise with stops in Cleveland, Port Huron, and Duluth. While here, it will be docked at the DECC and will be open for public tours this afternoon.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-21-2007

Gott gets Garfield berth

edwinhgott270114-1-164
The Edwin H. Gott came under the Lift Bridge on Sunday morning at 2:25. Later that morning, crew members had secured the boat at Garfield berth C (above) for winter lay up. The Stewart J. Cort came in at 6:54 Sunday morning and is now secured at Port Terminal berth 7. The next boat to arrive in the Twin Ports will be the Mesabi Miner, coming back on Tuesday from discharging a load of coal at Marquette. The Miner may take one more load before returning to spend the winter at the Midwest Energy Resources coal dock in Superior.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 01-15-2007

Edwin H. Gott here for winter layup

edwingott2611191-007
The Edwin H. Gott was expected here earlier this morning. This is the 13th time it has arrived in the Twin Ports this season. It will stay here, in layup, until sometime in late March or early April when it will again go out to carry taconite pellets from Lake Superior ports to a variety of steel making facilities on the lower lakes. It is coming here after discharging a cargo of taconite in Gary that it loaded in Two Harbors. The Stewart J. Cort was expected in for winter layup late last night.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 01-14-2007

Edwin H. Gott with Duluth backdrop

edwomgott260115--149
You never can be sure where you are going on a Great Lakes freighter. The Edwin H. Gott was expected to load taconite at Two Harbors for Gary on Thursday. Instead, it will be here today to get fuel first and then load taconite at Burlington Northern for Detroit. Assuming it does get here and do that, it will be the 10th trip to the Twin Ports this season. It was last here in late August. It was here 21 times last season. The Gott is the most powerful boat on the Great Lakes, generating 19,500 hp with two diesel engines. Built in 1979 at Sturgeon Bay, it was named for the president of the United States Steel Company from 1967 to 1969. Photo taken January 15, 2006.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 11-19-2006

Edwin H. Gott makes the turn

edwingott250822-3-141
The Edwin H. Gott will be here today to load taconite pellets for Gary, Indiana. They just completed a run with taconite pellets from Two Harbors to Gary. This will only be the Gott’s 5th trip to the Twin Ports this season, it made 20 trips last year. The Gott is the most powerful boat on the Great Lakes, generating 19,500 hp with two diesel engines. Built in 1979 at Sturgeon Bay, it was named for the president of the United States Steel Company from 1967 to 1969.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 07-07-2006

Gott getting lined up with bridge

edwingott250822-3-141
The Edwin H. Gott arrived here on Friday to get fuel and then load taconite for Nanticoke, Ontario. When the Gott was first built in 1978, it had a short shuttle boom that could only reach about 52 feet beyond the side of the boat. When visiting the port in Nanticoke to discharge cargo, it had to first discharge the cargo into a smaller, Canadian vessel which then discharged the cargo into shoreside equipment. In 1995, the Gott received what still is the Great Lakes longest self-unloading boom. It is 280 feet long. Most are only 250 feet long, but both considerably longer than the Gott’s first boom. The Gott spent the winter layup here but this is only its 3rd trip back this season. It was named for the President of the United States Steel Company from 1967 to 1969. Photo taken August 22, 2005.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-13-2006

Edwin H. Gott in Twin Ports harbor

edwinhgott260115-154
The Edwin H. Gott came into port yesterday afternoon (above), ending its season on the Great Lakes with its 21st visit to the Twin Ports. Like the other 10 boats that will be here for the winter, the Gott should be here until the middle of March or early April when the next shipping season will start up. There is only one more boat scheduled to arrive this season: on Tuesday the James R. Barker is finally coming to Duluth to stay (for the winter) after two quick coal trips on Lake Superior.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 01-16-2006

Three thousand footers today

edwingott230822-1-048
Three of the 13 thousand foot lakers on the Great Lakes will be coming to Duluth today. The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. will load coal, while the Mesabi Miner and the Edwin H. Gott will load taconite. The Edwin H. Gott (above) was named for the President of the United States Steel Company from 1967 to 1969.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/21/2005

Gott will take taconite to Detroit

edwingott220313-211
The Edwin H. Gott is loading taconite for Detroit, Michigan at the Burlington Northern Dock in Superior. In past years, the Gott spent the winter in Duluth and would not be leaving the Twin Ports so late in the year. But this year, it is laying up at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. Above, in winter layup at St. Lawrence Cement in March, 2003.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 01-13-2005

Edwin H. Gott loaded taconite

edwingott2611191-007
The Edwin H. Gott was named for the President of the United States Steel Company from 1967 to 1969. This year, the boat has been loading taconite at Two Harbors, Burlington Northern (Superior) and the DM&IR Dock in West Duluth and has been taking those cargos to a variety of ports on the southern shores of the Great Lakes where the taconite is used in steel production. Some of the ports are Gary in Indiana and Ashtabula and Conneaut in Ohio.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 12-15-2004

Edwin H. Gott got taconite

edwingott240322-1- 017
The Edwin H. Gott has been loading taconite at Two Harbors, Burlington Northern (Superior) and the DM&IR Dock in West Duluth this season. It has taken those cargos to a variety of ports on the southern shores of the Great Lakes where they are used to make steel. Some of the ports are Gary in Indiana and Ashtabula and Conneaut in Ohio. It is here today for the 10th time this year.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 10-29-2004

Gott to get taconite

edwingott240322-1- 017
The Edwin H. Gott often spends the winter layup in Duluth but it doesn’t get to Duluth very often during the shipping season. It will be here today for only the 6th time this season. On each trip, it has loaded taconite.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 09-20-2004

Edwin H. Gott arrives

edwingott230822-1-048
The Edwin H. Gott was named for the President of the United States Steel Company from 1967 to 1969. The vessel’s maiden voyage left Milwaukee on February 16, 1979 for Two Harbors to load iron ore.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-01-2004

2003, another spring to remember

                  (Click on any image for larger version)

230402--044
March 20, 2003: the Mackinaw (below) arrives Duluth.
230320-111
March 24, 2003: the Edgar B. Speer (below), Edwin H. Gott, and Roger Blough depart Duluth
230323--117web
March 29, 2003: The Frontenac is our first arrival of the year.
230329-135-web
April 1, 2003: The Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. (not pictured) departed Duluth, the last commercial traffic until she did it again on April 21
230403--018
April 3, 2003: The Indiana Harbor tried 9 times to get through ship canal (above) but could not. She left her mark on the ice however (below)
230403--021
April 5, 2003:
The task for the day was to help the Arthur M. Anderson and the Indiana Harbor depart using either the Duluth or Superior entry. We started the day, on the Sundew, breaking ice around the Arthur M. Anderson (below, center) in the Duluth harbor. 230405-2--004Captain Michael Gapczynski was trying to take his boat through the ice and out the Duluth entry. After making about four ice-breaking circles around the boat, word came to the Sundew from the Canadian ice breaker Samuel Risley that the ice beyond the Duluth piers would not budge. The Anderson returned to her dock.We headed straight for the Superior entry where we would join the Risley, now out beyond the ice jam and heading for the Superior piers. We would use the same plan for the day but at the Superior entry instead.
230405-2--099The Sundew made slow but steady progress through the piers. Just beyond the piers, she was stopped in the ice. I thought we were stuck in the ice, but I quickly found out the word to use was stopped. Of course, it’s a good time to get stuck, I mean stopped, in the ice. A larger ice breaker was waiting to help out just beyond the ice we were stopped in. As a 230405-2--181matter of fact, I suspect that one ice breaker enjoys coming to the aid of another ice breaker stopped in the ice.We were quickly freed and with two ice breakers now in the Superior channel, Sundew Captain Beverly Havlik (center) was happy with the condition of the ice. She decided to offer the captains of the Arthur M. 230405-2--096Anderson and the still waiting to depart Indiana Harbor a chance to take a look for themselves. She called them and they accepted her invitation to board the Sundew and go for a preview ride out to the Superior entry. We turned around and proceeded to the Port Terminal where we picked up our two new passengers.
230405-2--134It was a nice ride out to the Superior entry. Both Captains shared some really good sea stories. Every Captain on the Great Lakes I am sure has many stories to tell of bad times dealing with ice in the Great Lakes.T230405-2--146he story today was about to reach its conclusion. Both Gapczynski and Bill Millar, captain on the Indiana Harbor, decided they should go ahead. We took them back to their boats and returned to the channel to wait for them.
230405-2--204
The Anderson, though smaller, went first since her bow was angled. That gave her a better chance to move through the ice field. And, by now, I suspect the Indiana Harbor was not too interested in blazing new trails.
230405-2--220
Both boats made it out just fine, with the Sundew sitting off to the side, ready to help, but not needed this time. It was early evening, and at least for me, time to go home
230405-2--246
230405-2--256
230405-2--278
230409-1-114
Wednesday evening, April 9, 2003. The Sundew is still breaking ice in front of the Duluth ship canal while the rest of us enjoy spring. Below, you can still see the ridge made by the Indiana Harbor during her futile attempts to escape Duluth last week.The crew of the Sundew parked in the ice and spent Wednesday night on the boat. They were back breaking ice at 6 am Thursday morning. Some of the ice boulders they are breaking off are up to 15 feet high. Like ice bergs, only 1/3 of it is above water. Sometimes a boulder (the size of a small bus) breaks away from a heavier sheet and it pops up quite quickly and dramatically, reaching its own new position of 1/3 above and 2/3rds below water level. The Sundew returned to her dock around 6:30 pm. She will be out again, Friday morning.