Cornelia in, to replace the departing Federal Maas

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The Cornelia came in from her anchorage (above) this afternoon (November 10, 2016). After a short wait at the Port Terminal, she will move over to Riverland Ag this evening to replace the Federal Maas, that left the dock about an hour later going off to deliver her cargo.
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American Mariner departs while Cornelia waits, again!

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Before departing this morning (above, on October 30, 2016), the American Mariner arrived Duluth on Friday evening, October 28, 2016 to load wheat at the General Mills elevator in Superior.
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The Cornelia is at anchor off the Duluth piers waiting to come in to load grain. She arrived in the Twin Ports on October 16 with a cargo of cement she discharged at CRH, previously Holcim and before that St. Lawrence Cement. After discharging her cement cargo, she went out to the anchorage to wait before coming in for her grain cargo.
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The Mariner will carry her wheat cargo to Buffalo and discharge it at General Mills grain elevators there. This was her 11th trip here this season. On other trips, she has brought limestone and loaded coal or iron ore pellets. The Cornelia is here for her second time and her second time spending more than a few days at anchor. Last year, she had some legal difficulties that kept her out there for over 40 days. Since then, she was sold and is now free of any legal entanglements; just waiting and enjoying the weather.
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Elbeborg in, Cornelia out (at anchorage) waiting

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The Elbeborg arrived Duluth on Friday, October 21, 2016 to load beet pulp pellets. Behind her, the Cornelia is back at her old station off the Duluth piers, waiting to come in to load grain. She arrived with a cargo of cement she discharged at the CRH US dock  (formerly Holcim, and before that St. Lawrence Cement).

Cornelia discharging cement

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The Cornelia is back in town, currently discharging cement at the CRH US dock  (formerly Holcim, and before that St. Lawrence Cement) in Duluth above.

Cornelia returns to the scene of the crime

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The Cornelia, under new ownership, I am told, returned to Duluth this afternoon, Sunday, October 16, 2016. Below, she got an assist from the Heritage Marine tug Helen H.  Go here to read about the ‘crime’
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Finally

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These two pictures of the Cornelia were taken by René Beauchamp this morning, Saturday, December 26, 2015 at Côte Ste.Catherine, just below Montreal, in the St. Lawrence Seaway. René reports she is currently (Saturday afternoon) docked at Montreal and is presumably ready to depart North American and move into the Atlantic Ocean, finally (for details about her adventures in Duluth, click here).
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Cornelia leaves Duluth, finally; winter arrives, finally

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Listen:
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Cornelia to depart on Friday morning (hopefully)

Three unique vessels found their way under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge in the last few days.

2015-1102-4797A ship we have all come to know, or at least observe at the anchorage just beyond the Duluth piers, is the Cornelia (right). After over 40 days out there, she came in last night to get fuel and take care of some maintenance issues.

The Coast Guard reports that they “have reached an agreement. The vessel is making preparations to depart the Great Lakes prior to the seasonal closure of the locks.”

She is expected to depart Duluth, under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge, late tomorrow morning or early afternoon. As with any departure time, it may be later. Duluthboats.com will have updated information as soon as we find any new information on Friday morning.

2015-1215-5242The brand new Federal Bering (right), built for Great Lakes service in Japan this year, came in Tuesday to load grain.

There used to be a Canadian flagged boat called the Manitoulin. It is no longer in existence but a brand new (again) Manitoulin arrived in port last night. She was built in China where they combined the stern of a chemical tanker called Lalandia Swan with a brand new self-unloading bow section. She is here loading iron ore pellets at the CN dock in West Duluth (below).

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After 6 weeks at anchor, the Cornelia came in this afternoon

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… at 3:55 this afternoon (December 16, 2015). With the assistance of the Great Lakes tug Kentucky on her stern and the Arkansas at the bow, the Cornelia moved over to get some fuel. She will likely remain in port tonight and depart sometime tomorrow.
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Click here for other posts on Duluth Shipping News regarding the trials and tribulations of the Cornelia.

Brand new ship with the Port’s last cargo

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2015-1214-5233Other than the fact that it was too dark and I only caught the last half of the ship, I was happy to get this shot of the Federal Bering coming under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge last night (December 14, 2015) at 11 pm after a day or so at anchor in the Apostle Islands waiting for high winds to diminish. She then went over to CHS 2 in Superior to load the Port’s last cargo of grain on a salt water ship, a split load of wheat and canola that she will take to Mexico, leaving later this week. I said load and not left with the last cargo of grain since, as I write this, the Cornelia is still at anchor with her cargo of grain that she loaded at CHS 1 about  40 days ago. Winter may never get here but the Soo Locks will close on January 15, but of more importance to the Cornelia, the Welland Canal will close on December 26th and the rest of the Seaway by December 30th. Still don’t know what will become of her and her cargo, but I suppose she could become the last cargo on a salt water ship to depart, unless of course that award requires the cargo and ship to depart under the Lift Bridge and not from the anchorage. Laughing out loud

Coast Guard information on the Cornelia

More pictures of the Cornelia
Date: Dec 3, 2015: Ninth Coast Guard District provides the following information regarding the Cornelia
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Cornelia Motor vessel Cornelia investigation continues

CLEVELAND — The Coast Guard continues investigating an ocean-going freighter, currently at anchor in Duluth, Minnesota, for alleged violations of U.S. law.

The Coast Guard is investigating the crew, equipment and records of the Liberian-flagged motor vessel Cornelia for allegations involving violations related to the discharge of oily water.

Based upon current information in the investigation, it does not appear that the discharge occurred within the port of Duluth – Superior.

Although the Cornelia and crew are typically equipped to remain at sea for several months, Coast Guard personnel continue to check in with the master of the Cornelia regularly, who confirms the crew has adequate food, water and other necessities.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Minnesota accepted the case for criminal investigation November 9. The Coast Guard and the vessel’s owner and operator are negotiating a security agreement that would permit the vessel to depart the port while simultaneously protecting the integrity of the investigation and the interests of the vessel’s crew members.

The Coast Guard and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Minnesota take any allegations involving environmental pollution very seriously. At the same time, both agencies recognize the importance of the flow of commerce through the port of Duluth – Superior and are making every effort to complete our investigation as soon as possible.

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Date: Dec 3, 2015

Ninth Coast Guard District

Nothing new now, but I have a scoop from long ago

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In the old days, I was sometimes a good source for information about the port. Sometimes I even knew stuff I wasn’t supposed to talk about. Other times, I could and that was fun. Nowadays, I read the paper to find out about the exciting stuff; well not yet so exiting. The Duluth News Tribune had a picture of the Cornelia at anchor off the Duluth piers on their front page this morning (November 7, 2015). The above is the picture I took this morning. There was big news but the News Tribune didn’t know what the news was. I was happy to find out from them that there was news. I still don’t know why she is out there either. I refer you to the article for the list of people who will not tell them (us) what is going on. The US Attorney says the ship is being held there (by the Coast Guard, I assume) as a part of a federal probe. Hmmm.

Many years ago, when I was better connected (before 9-11), I found out a ship was coming to Duluth under armed guard. I got a ride out to the ship at anchor and was lucky enough to come in with her later in the day. She had many other names before she was decommissioned in 2011.

Radnik: 1984-1996
Grant Carrier: 1996-2001
Chios Sailor: 2001-2007
Elpida: 2007-2009
Chios Voyager: 2009-2011
Kai Shun: 2011 until decommissioned

Read below to find out about that adventure.

On July 5 the Grant Carrier and her crew of 27 left Odessa, a Ukrainian city on the Black Sea, on their way to Duluth. At the time, no ship with Yugoslavian officers was allowed in U.S. waters unless accompanied by armed guards, supplied by the Coast Guard and paid for by the shipowner. That was because our (NATO) planes were bombing their cities at the time.
So the Grant Carrier came to Duluth on August 17, 1999 with a contingent of five armed (but friendly) Coast Guard sailors. The officers and crew were indeed from Yugoslavia, many from Kotor, a city on the coast of the Adriatic Sea in Montenegro.
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The ship arrived and dropped anchor and waited for a party of local port officials to come out. I went out with them and took a gamble and asked the captain if I could stay aboard until the ship came in later that afternoon. (The gamble being the possibility that plans would change and the ship would stay at anchor, perhaps for days. There is no regularly scheduled transportation between the Duluth shore and a ship at anchor.
Above, Ship Captain Tomislav Radovic is at his desk talking with his guards; below, he is reading the latest issue of the Duluth Shipping News.
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Above, and 2 below, Grant Carrier crew members.
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The guards and the guarded lined up in a row. Below, later that afternoon, the ship, the guards and me come into Duluth
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We came in under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge late that afternoon, as promised. Both the Coast Guard and Captain Radovic and crew were out waving to the crowd, none of whom had any idea the guys in blue outfits were wearing pistols and guarding the ship.
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As soon as we docked, the Coast Guard left the ship for more private quarters in a local hotel, glad to be back on American soil. The officers and crew were just as interested in getting off the ship to see the sights in Duluth. The next evening, I was walking down Lake Avenue in Canal Park with Captain Radovic and First Mate Pajovic when we passed Grandma’s Sport’s Garden. Both men started to wave at someone playing pool inside. As we walked on, I asked whom they could possibly know in Duluth. Answer: their friendly Coast Guard ‘protectors’ were taking a break playing a few games of pool. I of course set aside the thought that they might be following us, although the captain did tell me that he had also run into them the night before.

On the evening the ship left Duluth, I went aboard with an armful of Port Authority coffee cups and passed them out to the crew. Some crewmembers left our deck party immediately but returned within minutes with gifts for me. They started with cigarettes and lighters, even though I insisted I didn’t smoke. I quickly realized that it was the thought that counts in these matters.

Others came back with beautiful maps of the area around Kotor. Kotor is a medieval city, and the pictures clearly showed the remains of the wall built centuries ago to protect the city from invaders. As we sat on the deck in Duluth, five of them pointed to houses in the pictures where they live, or once lived. They were so insistent on making sure I knew that they were nice, peace-loving people, as were the people of Montenegro, that I almost could not get off the ship. I was surely convinced, as I walked down the gangway to drive back to the ship canal.

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Above and below, my scans of the 2 posters the crew gave me.
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Old salts tell me the Grant Carrier was the first ship ever to come into Duluth under armed guard, and I had the scoop. I went up and down the piers passing out the Duluth Shipping News and telling people that the ship with the armed guards was coming soon. The crew was hyped, and I had suggested to the captain that he do some serious work with the ship’s whistle when they came under the bridge.

I was still not prepared for what happened. As the ship came around the buoy and approached the bridge, the entire crew was out on the deck, and not just standing there. They were all jumping up and down and waving. The captain hit the horn just before the ship went under the bridge, and he didn’t take his hand off until the ship was leaving the canal.

Those of us on the ground returned the jumping and the noise to the ship; it was quite a moment. I felt we had all made a small contribution to a better world given that our two countries were at war.

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And, I almost forgot, the Grant Carrier was docked the Cargill Elevator to load grain.

Cornelia waiting

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The Cornelia has been at anchor off the Duluth piers for several days, waiting to come in to load grain at CHS. This is her second trip here this year; she was here in May to load grain at Riverland Ag, formerly Cargill. On previous trips in December, 2012 and November, 2013, she discharged clay at the Port Terminal before loading grain.

Party at the Port Terminal

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After discharging limestone at the Graymont Lime Plant, the Joseph L. Block (left) is making the turn into the Duluth harbor as she departed Duluth for Two Harbors this morning (November 26, 2013). She will load iron ore pellets at the CN dock there.  The Presque Isle is at the Calumet Fuel dock and in front of her, the Cornelia is still discharging clay at the Port Terminal. In the middle, a Great Lakes Towing tug appears to be returning to her dock.

A cold day in Duluth for Cornelia

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The Cornelia came in by way of the Superior entry at 6:41 this morning (November 23, 2013). This was the first really cold day in Duluth and the Cornelia certainly proves the point. I took a picture of her hull, above right,  coated with ice, courtesy of an 11 mph head wind from the North West with gusts up to 30 mph as she crossed Lake Superior yesterday. She was discharging cargo at the Port Terminal while the John D. Leitch was waiting at the Calumet Fuel dock for the Stewart J. Cort to finish loading iron ore pellets at the BN. Turning around, I caught the rest of the Cornelia. Her previous name was Pine and you can see the outline of that name toward the end of her current name in the picture below.
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