More salt for Duluth

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The Algoma Enterprise has been discharging salt at the North American Salt Dock for the last two days; she is expected to complete the discharge later this evening. In the old days, until about 2008, the Algoma Enterprise, then the Canadian Enterprise, loaded coal at Midwest Energy Resources in Superior and carried it to the Ontario Power Generator in Nanticoke, Ontario. She and her sister boat, now the Algoma Transport, then the Canadian Transport, averaged around 25 trips a year on that route. Trading routes can change as often as a boat’s name; in this case, the Nanticoke plant began using nuclear power to generate electricity. Since 2009, we see the Algoma Enterprise only about 5 times a year.

… more waiting

Canadian Transport and Nogat at anchor off the Duluth piers
The Polish owned Nogat (left) was joined by the Canadian Transport last night (May 3, 2011) at anchor off the Duluth piers. The Canadian Transport came in this morning at 2:59 to load iron ore pellets, replacing the Canadian Olympic. She finished at the CN dock and departed under the Aerial Lift Bridge this  morning at 5:24. The CSL Tadoussac has replaced the Transport at anchor. Algoma Central recently purchased both the Transport and the Olympic. They will soon be called the Algoma Transport and the Algoma Olympic.

Canadian Transport amid many visitors

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Blue skies, birds and babies greeted the Canadian Transport when it came into port on Sunday afternoon (above). Last year, it averaged 9.6 hours in port over the 19 trips it made to the Twin Ports. It takes a little under an hour to get from the bridge to the coal dock each way, so it averaged about 7½ hours at the loading dock. It is actually a little less than that since it took on fuel on some of those trips and probably had to wait for the dock on others. The shortest time in port last year was 7.7 hours; the longest was 17.2 hours. Photo taken on May 17, 2009
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-18-2009

Getting greener by the day

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The Canadian Transport came into Duluth late Sunday afternoon on May 17th, 2008. She is here to load 30,000 tons of coal for Ontario Power Generation in Nanticoke.

Canadian Transport arrives in snow for coal

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Saturday afternoon, the Canadian Transport came into port to load coal (above). After waiting a couple hours for the Mesabi Miner to finish loading coal at Midwest Energy Resources, it moved in to replace the Miner at the coal dock. For the Miner, this was its 50th trip to the Twin Ports this season; it is only the 18th for the Transport. The Miner, a thousand footer, loaded 58,000 tons of coal for Presque Isle, on the south shore of Lake Superior. The Transport, at 730 feet, loaded 30,000 tons of coal for Ontario Power Generation in Nanticoke. Photo taken on December 20, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 12-21-2008

Canadian Transport here to load coal

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The newly built Loireborg arrived off the Duluth piers last night and dropped anchor to wait for the berth at General Mills. Just before the Loireborg appeared, the Canadian Transport arrived (above) in port to load coal at Midwest Energy Resources. The American Spirit was due early this morning and will likely become third boat to lay up for winter. The Edward L. Ryerson and the American Victory are already here for layup, both at Fraser Shipyards in Superior. Photo taken on December 10, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 12-11-2008

Canadian Transport for coal

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Coal is still a big cargo for the port, almost all of it loaded from Midwest Energy Resources in Superior. Above, the Canadian Transport came in Friday morning for coal. It probably left Friday night and was replaced by the Algosoo. The Mesabi Miner may have anchored off the Duluth piers last night before coming in to follow the Algosoo. Later today, the Algorail will arrive to take its turn after the Miner completes. It is the 7th trip here for the Canadian Transport, the 5th for the Algosoo, the 24th for the Mesabi Miner and the 6th for the Algorail.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 07-19-2008

Canadian Transport departs with crowd watching

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To the end of June, we have had 402 ship arrivals in the Twin Ports this season. That is 7 less than last year. Through June, we had only 24 salt water ships here. That is 9 less than last year. Canadian trips in June are down by 6 and the US flagged vessel count was up 8. Last June, we totaled 131 arrivals; this year, we had 136. That is a modest increase over last year, but no increase was evident for the first two days of the long weekend, and today will not change that much. So when the Canadian Transport showed up at the Lift Bridge yesterday afternoon, and it was only the second daylight trip under the bridge for the day, a huge crowd (above) was at the ship canal to wish them well as they went out into Lake Superior with a cargo of coal. Even the balcony at the Marine Museum was packed.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 07-06-2008

Canadian Transport leaves with coal

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The big news today is the rebirth of the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. After almost 4 months of repairs, it will be going out in the lake this morning for sea trials and is expected back early this evening to load coal at Midwest Energy Resources in Superior. It will follow the Canadian Transport seen above departing Duluth in April, 2004. Both boats will be taking coal to Ontario Power Generation in Nanticoke.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-06-2008

Canadian Transport enters the harbor

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After spending a day or more waiting out the wind at Thunder Bay, the Canadian Transport decided to come over to Duluth in time for the snow storm. It arrived here on Saturday afternoon (above), coming under the Lift Bridge just as the Mesabi Miner was getting ready to depart the coal dock at Midwest Energy Resources, and the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was moving in. The Canadian Transport asked for a wake up call from the McCarthy about an hour before the McCarthy finishes loading coal. That should be about the time the sun rises, not that they will see it. Coal is loaded in any weather; grain is not. Liquid is not good for grain. Grain loading is always stopped when it rains, and usually when it snows. The Captain of the ship makes that decision since he is the one who will be delivering the cargo to the customer. Both the Federal Asahi and the Federal Hunter will be held over until Monday. With better weather, they might have departed today. Photo taken on December 01,  2007
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 12-02-2007

Canadian Transport arriving Duluth canal

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The Ypermachos finally departed the Twin Ports with grain last night. The Beluga Energy was due in Tuesday night but high winds on Lake Superior forced the ship to take cover near the Keweenaw Peninsula in Michigan, on the south shore of Lake Superior. It was expected in last night and should be discharging wind turbine parts from Spain at first light this morning at the Port Terminal. Only two other boats will be moving in the port today; the John J. Boland is loading coal at Midwest Energy Resources in Superior and departing this afternoon and the Canadian Transport is coming in to do the same thing. Above the Canadian Transport is seen arriving in Duluth on August 11, 2002. On Friday, 10 boats are expected to arrive in the Twin Ports.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 11-29-2007

Ice not nice

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The Canadian Transport came into port last night around 6 pm (above). It went over to Midwest Energy Resources to load coal and likely left early this morning. The Algolake followed it in last night to get fuel, and then had planned to go back under the bridge and to the anchorage to wait its turn at Midwest. Both boats had to move through the latest version of this year’s Duluth ice pack, this time in and just beyond the Duluth piers. After disappearing for several days, an east wind returned, not real strong but just enough to collect Western Lake Superior’s ice and deposit it at the Duluth piers. Neither boat had any trouble with the ice. It will be interesting to know if the Algolake went out and stayed in the ice pack last night, or decided to go to the open water beyond the ice just in case.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/10/2007

Canadian Transport under the Lift Bridge

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The Canadian Transport is making its 16th trip here this season, each time loading low sulfur western coal for Ontario Power Generation in Nanticoke. Above, it is going under the Lift Bridge on its 14th trip here on August 20th. It was built in 1979, with its sister ship, the Canadian Enterprise, to move low sulfur, western coal to Ontario power plants. They still work that trade together. The Enterprise is due here Friday. That will be its 15th visit to the Twin Ports. Both boats load about 30,000 tons of coal on each visit. The Canadian Transport has averaged almost nine hours in port on each trip this season. It was expected in last night around 9 pm. That would put it going out under the Lift Bridge around 6 am this morning.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 09-13-2006

Canadian Transport framed by Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge

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The Canadian Transport is making its 4th trip here this season, each time loading low sulfur western coal for Ontario Power Generation in Nanticoke. It was built in 1979, the same year 10 additional inches were added to the allowable width for vessels transiting the Welland Canal. Accordingly, the Canadian Transport was built with a width of 75 feet, 8 inches, providing 31,800 more cubic feet of cargo space. It is loading about 30,000 tons of coal today. Above, it is coming under the Lift Bridge in June, 2004.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-03-2006

Canadian Transport bound for Nanticoke

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The Canadian Transport is here loading about 30,000 tons of low sulfur coal brought here by train from mines in Wyoming and Montana. It will take that cargo to Ontario Power Generation at Nanticoke.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-25-2005

Canadian Transport passes under the Aerial Lift Bridge

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The Canadian Transport was built in 1979, the same year additional width was allowed for vessels transiting the Welland Canal. Ten inches was added to the previous allowable width of 75 feet. The Canadian Transport was built with a width of 75 feet, 8 inches. The 8 inches provided 31,800 more cubic feet of cargo space. It is loading about 30,000 tons of coal for Ontario Power Generation in Nanticoke, Ontario, the usual cargo and destination for this boat.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 03-30-2005

Canadian Transport arrives under Aerial Lift Bridge

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The Canadian Transport was built in 1979, the same year additional width was allowed for vessels transiting the Welland Canal. Ten inches was added to the previous maximum width of 75 feet, providing 31,800 more cubic feet of cargo space. This is the 20th trip the Canadian Transport has made to the Twin Ports this season. It is loading about 30,000 tons of coal for Ontario Power Generation in Nanticoke, Ontario, the usual cargo and destination for this boat.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 12-27-2004

Canadian Transport departing Duluth

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The Canadian Transport will be here today for the 12th time this season. Above it is departing on April 4th of this year after the first trip to the Twin Ports. As on most of the trips, it will load coal for Ontario Power Generation.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-05-2004

Canadian Transport arrives

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The Canadian Transport was built in 1979, the same year that some additional breadth was allowed for vessels transiting the Welland Canal. Instead of being 75 feet wide, the previous maximum width, she is that plus 10 inches. The additional 10 inches allows for 31,800 more cubic feet of cargo space.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-30-2004