Arthur M. Anderson home for the winter

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The Great Lakes Fleet’s Arthur M. Anderson arrived Duluth for winter layup on Sunday, January 15, 2017 just after noon. This was her 22nd and last trip to Duluth this season. On most of those trips, she brought limestone in and then usually departed for Two Harbors where she loaded iron ore pellets
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Vlieborg, Anderson pass in the Duluth harbor

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The Vlieborg (above) arrived this morning (May 31, 2016) at 6:25 as the Arthur M. Anderson was departing, passing each other in the Duluth harbor. This is the second visit of this version of the Vlieborg; she was also here in November, 2012 (the year she was built) to load beet pulp pellets.  Notice the ladder hanging down from the deck of the Vlieborg and also her direction, as if she, like the Anderson, is departing. The Vlieborg is in the harbor for inspection by local grain officials and other port personnel. When that is complete, she may go out to the anchorage, stay where she is or go over to CHS to load grain. Today’s weather, cold, with high winds and rain, may keep her there; going out to the anchorage in this wind may not be the Captain’s first choice, and grain is not loaded when it is raining. This was the 6th visit to the Twin Ports for the Anderson this season. She loaded iron ore pellets at the CN.

Anderson arrives for first visit in new season

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The Arthur M. Anderson spent the winter layup in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. She left there on Sunday morning (March 27, 2016) and arrived in Duluth at 12:15 today (March 29, 2016) to load iron ore pellets at the CN dock in West Duluth. She made 19 trips to Duluth Superior last season and has averaged about 20 trips a year since 2010. She was the 9th boat to arrive Duluth Superior this season; the 6th to come under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge (the other 3 arrived by way of the Superior entry).
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Anderson page updates

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Icy cold in Duluth

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December 9, 2013: winter in Duluth began early and hard. Ice and cold have brought the tugs out early to keep traffic moving. This morning, the Arthur M. Anderson received help from the Nels J., below, getting close to the Calumet Fuel Dock at the Port Terminal in Duluth.
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Duluth on a Saturday night

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Saturday evening, June 8, 2013, Duluth harbor. The Arthur M. Anderson had arrived in port at 7 am that morning with limestone to discharge at the C. Reiss terminal in West Duluth. Finished with that job, she departed Duluth at 7:38 Saturday evening (below) for the Two Harbors CN dock to load iron ore pellets. Not sure why she is pointing away from the Aerial Bridge above (possibly turning around after fueling). Behind the Anderson, we see the Joseph L. Block, arriving under the Aerial Bridge at 7 pm, on her way to discharge limestone at the CN dock in West Duluth. At the right, we see the Liberian flagged  Yulia still at the Port Terminal where she has been discharging cargo for several days.
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In 2013, the Anderson has worked the limestone trade, loading in Port Dolomite and Calcite in Michigan and discharging that cargo at the Hallett dock and C. Reiss Dock in Duluth, at Buffington and Huron in Ohio and in Detroit. Her trips to Duluth with limestone are followed by loading iron ore pellets at the CN docks in Duluth or Two Harbors which she takes to either Gary or Conneaut. Then after a couple trips loading and discharging limestone in the lower lakes, she brings a load up here to discharge before loading iron ore pellets for her downbound trip.

Anderson gets bird escort

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The Arthur M. Anderson came into port Tuesday afternoon at 4:15, alarming a lot of birds in the process (above). It stopped at the Port Terminal to wait for the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. to complete loading coal for Detroit Edison. That should have happened last night, leaving the dock at Midwest Energy open for the Anderson to move in to load a cargo of coal for Presque Isle, Michigan. Photo taken on December 23, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 12-24-2008

Arthur M. Anderson departing Duluth

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The Kaye E. Barker has been making quick trips to Taconite Harbor. She left yesterday to take a cargo of coal to Marquette. The Arthur M. Anderson will be here today with an even quicker trip to deliver coal. After discharging a cargo of limestone, it will load about 19,000 tons of coal at Midwest Energy Resources in Superior and deliver it about a mile away at the Graymont Superior plant, formerly the Cutler dock. The coal is used there to fire up kilns that make lime using limestone discharged by other boats coming up from the lower lakes. When completed, the Anderson will return to Midwest Energy to load 18,000 tons of coal for Marquette, Michigan. Photo taken on April 17, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 11-10-2008

Arthur M. Anderson leaving the Twin Ports

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The Arthur M. Anderson was expected to arrive last night with a cargo of limestone loaded at Cedarville, Michigan. After getting fuel at the Murphy Fuel Dock in Duluth, it was expected to go to the Hallett #5 dock in West Duluth to discharge the limestone and then load iron ore pellets for Gary. This is the 14th visit the Anderson has made to the Twin Ports. It bought limestone on each of those trips and usually loaded iron ore pellets, as today, for the return trip to the lower lakes. Above, it is seen departing Duluth on April 17th this year.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 11-01-2008

Arthur M. Anderson approaching Duluth ship canal

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Above, the Arthur M. Anderson arrived in Duluth on Thursday morning to discharge limestone before loading iron ore pellets for Conneaut. It should be departing this morning. This afternoon, the Canadian flagged Nanticoke will be here to load coal for Sydney, Nova Scotia, a port on the Atlantic Ocean. The Nanticoke was strengthened for ocean service. In 1997, it carried ballast material to be used under an offshore drilling platform.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 07-25-2008

Arthur M. Anderson with limestone from Calcite, Michigan

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The Arthur M. Anderson is due in port this morning with a cargo of limestone loaded in Calcite, Michigan. Much of the limestone that is brought up from lower lakes ports is used on the Iron Range in the production of taconite pellets. The finished pellets, with the limestone inside, come down by rail to a Lake Superior port where it is loaded into boats and taken to steel mills on the lower Great Lakes. The limestone makes a round trip there but we have to wait until the taconite is fed into steel mills, steel is produced and we buy a car up here before the taconite completes its round trip. Above, the Anderson departs Duluth this past April.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 07-24-2008

Arthur M. Anderson comes in on the wind

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The wind slowed a number of boats yesterday. After the Spar Jade departed Duluth at 6:42 in the morning, there was no traffic under the Lift Bridge until the Arthur M. Anderson came in around 5:15 in the afternoon (above). After stopping for fuel at the Murphy Fuel Dock in Duluth, it was expected to go to the CN Dock to discharge a cargo of limestone. That should take most of the night. Around first light, it may depart for Two Harbors to load iron ore pellets for Gary. Weather may still slow traffic in the harbor today until the wind dies down later in the day.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-12-2008

Arthur M. Anderson in with limestone

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The Arthur M. Anderson spent the winter layup at Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay and made its first trip to Duluth yesterday, coming in with a cargo of limestone around 9 in the morning. It departed Duluth for Two Harbors late Thursday afternoon (above). It will load iron ore pellets there for Gary, Indiana. We will likely not see any boat traffic in the Twin Ports today until this evening. Two boats from the Interlake Steamship Company will be here. The Charles M. Beeghly is expected first. It is also making its first trip here this season. It will load iron ore pellets. The Paul R. Tregurtha will follow, loading coal at Midwest Energy Resources.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 04-18-2008

Arthur M. Anderson arriving Duluth

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Boats on Lake Superior took refuge during the recent storm, some in Whitefish Bay, others off the Keweenaw. Today, some of them should be back in service. Two of them, the Arthur M. Anderson (above, arriving Duluth in 2002) and the Cason J. Callaway, are expected here with cargo to discharge. The Halifax arrived here on Thursday morning to load bentonite, but loading was delayed by the heavy rain. When wet, bentonite is very mucky so it is not loaded in the rain. However, it sits outside in a big pile before being loaded. One would think it would be a mess after a rainstorm, but it has a peculiar reaction to water. When the outside of the pile gets wet, the bentonite expands and forms a crust around the whole pile about 2 inches thick. The pile of bentonite maintains or protects itself in the rain, a very nice property to the workers at the Hallett Dock. That characteristic also makes it valuable in situations where a sealant or an impermeable barrier is needed such as the bottom of a landfill so that waste material does not get into the soil. When the rain went away, the heavy equipment at the Hallett Dock dug into the pile. The outer crust was easily broken up and the sand-like material was loaded onto a conveyor belt going into the ship’s cargo hold. The Halifax finally departed Duluth last night.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 10-21-2007

Anderson coming in to Twin Ports

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Three thousand footers are due in Duluth before noon today. The Mesabi Miner and the Paul R. Tregurtha will be here to load coal at Midwest Energy Resources in Superior. The James R. Barker is also expected to go under the Lift Bridge for fuel at the Murphy Fuel Dock at the Port Terminal. It will then go down the Superior channel to the Burlington Northern Santa Fe dock just inside the Superior entry. Both coal boats should also be departing Duluth before the day is out. The not quite so long Arthur M. Anderson is bringing limestone from Cedarville, Michigan to discharge at the CN Dock in West Duluth. Above, it is entering the Duluth ship channel in October, 2002.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-07-2007

Arthur M. Anderson arriving Duluth

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The Borkum is coming to Duluth today to load spring wheat. The ship was built in 1994 as the Erna Oldendorff but never came to Duluth under that name. The Borkum is 485 feet long. The Rebecca may depart the Twin Ports with spring wheat for Malta. A 3rd salt water ship, the Clipper Falcon, may also depart here after loading grain. The Canadian flagged Algocape will likely continue loading grain here until Tuesday. The Arthur M. Anderson will be here with limestone to discharge before heading over to Two Harbors to load taconite. Above, it is arriving Duluth in October, 2002.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 10-02-2006

And the Anderson also

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The Arthur M. Anderson arrived Duluth on Sunday with a load of limestone and some heavy accompaniment from John Lee Hooker Jr. and his band. Duluth will be much quieter when the Anderson departs today with taconite.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-15-2005

Arthur M. Anderson visits Twin Ports

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This shipping season started slow but by the end of July, we recorded 502 ship arrivals in Duluth Superior for this shipping season. Last year, on July 31, we only had 490 visits to our two ports. The Arthur M. Anderson was visit number 502 on July 31st. It brought limestone from Calcite, Michigan and then loaded taconite for Detroit. Photo taken July 17, 2003.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-10-2005

Arthur M. Anderson

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The Arthur M. Anderson is here today discharging limestone. After that, it will depart light for Two Harbors and load taconite for Conneaut, Ohio. The Anderson is best known for trailing the Edmund Fitzgerald when the Fitzgerald went down near Whitefish Bay in Lake Superior on November 10, 1975.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 07-13-2005

Anderson here with limestone

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The Arthur M. Anderson will be here today with a cargo of limestone. After it completes discharging that cargo at two different docks, it will depart light for Two Harbors. The Anderson is best known for trailing the Edmund Fitzgerald when the Fitzgerald went down near Whitefish Bay in Lake Superior on November 10, 1975.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-15-2005

Fresh paint for the Arthur M. Anderson

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The newly painted Arthur M. Anderson departed Duluth with a new coat of paint on March 25th (above). After taking taconite from Two Harbors to Conneaut, Ohio, and making a couple trips to ports in the lower lakes, it will be returning to Duluth today with a load of limestone.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/8/2005

Anderson finally gets new paint

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The best looking boat of the year should be departing Duluth today. The Arthur M. Anderson had 53 years of paint removed this winter and has a brand new paint job. Since it is loading at Two Harbors, it should depart Duluth with nothing but new paint on the hull of the boat. It will never again look this good.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 03-24-2005

Anderson in the 2003 ice

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Above, the Arthur M. Anderson was caught in a harbor full of ice on April 5th, 2003 as it was trying to depart the Duluth entry. With ice-breaking help from the Sundew, it was able to depart the Superior entry about 8 hours later. The Anderson comes in today for winter layup with better possibilities for movement, despite the very cold weather.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 01-15-2005

Anderson always welcomed

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Making its 5th trip here this year, the Arthur M. Anderson will discharge limestone at the DM&IR Dock in West Duluth. When completed, it will go to Two Harbors to load taconite for steel mills on the lower Great Lakes. The Anderson is best known as the ship that trailed the Edmund Fitzgerald when the Fitzgerald went down near Whitefish Bay in Lake Superior on November 10, 1975. Photo taken July 17, 2003.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 11-06-2004

Anderson enters Duluth canal

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The Arthur M. Anderson was built in 1952 by the American Shipbuilding Company at Lorain, Ohio, lengthened by 120 feet at the Fraser Shipyard in Superior in 1975 and converted to a self-unloader in 1982 when a 250-foot self-unloading boom was added to the deck.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 07-27-2004

Anderson a favorite sight

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The Arthur M. Anderson was named for a director of U.S. Steel in 1952. It is best known as the boat that trailed the Edmund Fitzgerald when the Fitzgerald went down near Whitefish Bay in Lake Superior on November 10, 1975.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-20-2004

2003, another spring to remember

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March 20, 2003: the Mackinaw (below) arrives Duluth.
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March 24, 2003: the Edgar B. Speer (below), Edwin H. Gott, and Roger Blough depart Duluth
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March 29, 2003: The Frontenac is our first arrival of the year.
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April 1, 2003: The Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. (not pictured) departed Duluth, the last commercial traffic until she did it again on April 21
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April 3, 2003: The Indiana Harbor tried 9 times to get through ship canal (above) but could not. She left her mark on the ice however (below)
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April 5, 2003:
The task for the day was to help the Arthur M. Anderson and the Indiana Harbor depart using either the Duluth or Superior entry. We started the day, on the Sundew, breaking ice around the Arthur M. Anderson (below, center) in the Duluth harbor. 230405-2--004Captain Michael Gapczynski was trying to take his boat through the ice and out the Duluth entry. After making about four ice-breaking circles around the boat, word came to the Sundew from the Canadian ice breaker Samuel Risley that the ice beyond the Duluth piers would not budge. The Anderson returned to her dock.We headed straight for the Superior entry where we would join the Risley, now out beyond the ice jam and heading for the Superior piers. We would use the same plan for the day but at the Superior entry instead.
230405-2--099The Sundew made slow but steady progress through the piers. Just beyond the piers, she was stopped in the ice. I thought we were stuck in the ice, but I quickly found out the word to use was stopped. Of course, it’s a good time to get stuck, I mean stopped, in the ice. A larger ice breaker was waiting to help out just beyond the ice we were stopped in. As a 230405-2--181matter of fact, I suspect that one ice breaker enjoys coming to the aid of another ice breaker stopped in the ice.We were quickly freed and with two ice breakers now in the Superior channel, Sundew Captain Beverly Havlik (center) was happy with the condition of the ice. She decided to offer the captains of the Arthur M. 230405-2--096Anderson and the still waiting to depart Indiana Harbor a chance to take a look for themselves. She called them and they accepted her invitation to board the Sundew and go for a preview ride out to the Superior entry. We turned around and proceeded to the Port Terminal where we picked up our two new passengers.
230405-2--134It was a nice ride out to the Superior entry. Both Captains shared some really good sea stories. Every Captain on the Great Lakes I am sure has many stories to tell of bad times dealing with ice in the Great Lakes.T230405-2--146he story today was about to reach its conclusion. Both Gapczynski and Bill Millar, captain on the Indiana Harbor, decided they should go ahead. We took them back to their boats and returned to the channel to wait for them.
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The Anderson, though smaller, went first since her bow was angled. That gave her a better chance to move through the ice field. And, by now, I suspect the Indiana Harbor was not too interested in blazing new trails.
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Both boats made it out just fine, with the Sundew sitting off to the side, ready to help, but not needed this time. It was early evening, and at least for me, time to go home
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Wednesday evening, April 9, 2003. The Sundew is still breaking ice in front of the Duluth ship canal while the rest of us enjoy spring. Below, you can still see the ridge made by the Indiana Harbor during her futile attempts to escape Duluth last week.The crew of the Sundew parked in the ice and spent Wednesday night on the boat. They were back breaking ice at 6 am Thursday morning. Some of the ice boulders they are breaking off are up to 15 feet high. Like ice bergs, only 1/3 of it is above water. Sometimes a boulder (the size of a small bus) breaks away from a heavier sheet and it pops up quite quickly and dramatically, reaching its own new position of 1/3 above and 2/3rds below water level. The Sundew returned to her dock around 6:30 pm. She will be out again, Friday morning.