American Mariner departs while Cornelia waits, again!

2016-1030-0033
Before departing this morning (above, on October 30, 2016), the American Mariner arrived Duluth on Friday evening, October 28, 2016 to load wheat at the General Mills elevator in Superior.
2016-1030-0041
The Cornelia is at anchor off the Duluth piers waiting to come in to load grain. She arrived in the Twin Ports on October 16 with a cargo of cement she discharged at CRH, previously Holcim and before that St. Lawrence Cement. After discharging her cement cargo, she went out to the anchorage to wait before coming in for her grain cargo.
2016-1030-0051
The Mariner will carry her wheat cargo to Buffalo and discharge it at General Mills grain elevators there. This was her 11th trip here this season. On other trips, she has brought limestone and loaded coal or iron ore pellets. The Cornelia is here for her second time and her second time spending more than a few days at anchor. Last year, she had some legal difficulties that kept her out there for over 40 days. Since then, she was sold and is now free of any legal entanglements; just waiting and enjoying the weather.
2016-1030-0055

4 boats for the Fourth of July

2016-0704-7134
In the afternoon on July 4th, 2016,the tug Ken Boothe, Sr. pushed the barge Lakes Contender through the Duluth harbor, on her way to discharge a cargo of limestone at the Graymont dock in Superior. They loaded their cargo in Calcite, Michigan. The tug barge is owned by the American Steamship Company in Buffalo, New York. They also operate the American Mariner; after loading coal at Midwest Energy, she departed at 5:25 this afternoon.
2016-0704-7142
2016-0704-7178
The US Coast Guard ice breaker Mackinaw arrived in port Sunday morning, hoping to get (I assume) a good spot to watch the fireworks tonight. Notice the sleeping bags and blankets on the ground, left by folks hoping to save their spots for the fireworks 4 hours later. There were also two ladies with blankets and a basket of food sitting on the grass with the Mackinaw directly in front of them. Perhaps they were hoping a crew member would take pity on them and bring them aboard for a better seat.  (click the link just above, to the Mackinaw page and watch her launch on April 2, 2005. And yes, I managed to stay on my feet and to hold my camera, proof of which is the video you see.
2016-0704-7154
The Sjard arrived  just before 6 pm and with an assist from the tug Kentucky, made her way over to the CHS dock in Superior where she will begin to load grain on Tuesday morning. Earlier in June, she brought a cargo of wind turbine parts that she discharged at the Port Terminal.

American Mariner here for grain.

20140514_073420_JohnZywicki
John Zywicki took this picture this  morning (May 14, 2014) while the American Mariner was loading grain at Duluth Storage, formerly the Cargill Elevator. She arrived early this morning for her first trip to the Twin Ports this season. Her self unloader is up and moved to the side so the grain loader can access her cargo holds.

American Mariner loads wheat from Riverland Ag for Buffalo

americanmariner20131001_0337

Waves to the American Mariner

americanmariner20111021_6184
The American Mariner arrived Duluth on Friday, October 21st around noon. She is loading wheat at General Mills in Superior to take to Buffalo. She follows the path that the Kinsman Independent (now called the Ojibway) used to take for many years, keeping General Mills flour mills filled with wheat so they can make lots of Wheaties. Listen to her whistle and the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge response.
americanmariner20111021_6192

American Mariner plus one arrive Duluth on Tuesday morning, August 11, 2009

 20090811_1114

American Mariner here for coal

americanmariner20090428_5242
The American Mariner came into port late afternoon on Tuesday (above). It was expected to depart very early this morning taking a cargo of coal to We-Energies in Milwaukee. This is the third trip here this season. Last season, it made 11 visits to the Twin Ports. The Paul R. Tregurtha left here on Tuesday morning with coal for Taconite Harbor. It is discharging that today and will be back on Thursday for more coal, this time for Marquette.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 04-29-2009

American Mariner, twice

americamariner20090418_4946
When a boat comes under the Lift Bridge twice in one day, it usually comes in first and departs later in the day. The American Mariner will first depart the port this morning and then return this evening. It arrived last night (above) to load coal for Silver Bay Power and should leave this morning to deliver that cargo before returning later today to load coal for Presque Isle, Mich. In each case, it will load about 28,000 tons.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 04-19-2009

American Mariner coming in for coal

americanmariner20081116_0532PROD
The American Mariner came into port on Sunday afternoon (above) to load coal. It probably departed for Milwaukee very early this morning. Three salt water ships will be moving in the harbor today. The Dutch flagged Jumbo Vision is expected around noon with 12 large containment vessels that will eventually go to oil sands projects in Alberta. Later today, the BBC Maine, flying the flag of Antigua, will depart with grain and the Dutch flagged Vlistborg will leave with beet pulp pellets. Photo taken on November 16, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 11-17-2008

American Mariner departs to the blues

americanmariner20070812_1550
Fiona Boyes and the Fortune Tellers made it to the Bayfront Blues Festival stage on Sunday afternoon in time to sing to the Beluga Expectation leaving for Spain with wind turbine blades and the American Mariner departing with coal for Milwaukee. Above, she serenades the American Mariner. Photo taken on August 12, 2007.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-13-2007

American Mariner lines up to depart Duluth

americanmariner220625-141
The Kapitonas Stulpinas should be arriving under the Lift Bridge very early this morning. It comes to Duluth about once a year, often, as today, to load bentonite. It was built in Ukraine in 1981 as part of the former Soviet Union’s merchant vessel fleet. Like many other ships in that fleet, it is now owned and operated by the Lithuanian Shipping Company at Klaipeda, a port located on the Baltic Sea. The heavy lift ship Fairlift is another salt water ship expected to arrive today. It has not been here since 2000, although its sister ships, the Fairlane and Fairload, have made 4 trips here since then. They always bring very heavy industrial pieces that are loaded onto rail cars at the Port Terminal and then taken to Alberta where they are used in several different oil sands projects (removing oil from sand). The American Mariner was expected last night with limestone loaded in Calcite, Michigan. After discharging that cargo, it will load coal for Milwaukee. Above, it departed Duluth on June 25th, 2002.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-28-2007

American Mariner visits the Twin Ports

americanmariner220625-141
I was asking about Skaftafell and people looked down on the ground for their Skaftas. No, the ship named the Skaftafell. It is coming to Duluth to load very large electrical modules to take to Iceland. The BBC India was here earlier loading the same modules for Iceland. It turns out that Skaftafell is the name of a National Park in Iceland that is close to Kirkjubæjarklaustur. This is a good day for ship names. The Nina and the Flinterduin should be departing with grain, as will or did the Beluga Indication. And, closer to home, the American Mariner makes its 27th visit today. Photo taken June 25, 2002.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 10-19-2006

American Mariner will take taconite out

americanmariner220625-141
Six boats were recently sold by the Oglebay Norton Company in Cleveland to American Steamship in Buffalo. With that sale came 6 name changes. It has been hard to keep track of the changes. One change was a little easier because the renaming happened at Fraser Shipyards in Superior. There, the Courtney Burton became the American Fortitude. The other 5 boats received new names at the same time at other shipyards around the Great Lakes. Each new boat name started with American. The 5 had these second names: Valor, Integrity, Century, Courage and Victory. The American Mariner will be coming into port today to load taconite pellets for Indiana Harbor. It has been the American Mariner since it was launched by American Steamship in 1980, although when construction started on it, the name was to be Chicago. Photo taken June 25, 2002.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-27-2006

American Mariner to start season

americanmariner260227-1-181
The American Mariner, which has spent much of the winter in dry dock at the Fraser Shipyards in Superior (above), should finally go out to make a living, in this case, loading taconite at Two Harbors for Zug Island, Michigan. Zug Island is a man made island in River Rouge, Michigan, just south of Detroit, and the home of a steel plant now owned by United States Steel. That leaves the Reserve as the only remaining tenant from the winter. In early March, it was sold by the Oglebay Norton Company to K&K Warehousing in Menominee, Michigan.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/6/2006

Earl W. Oglebay delayed in Duluth

earloglebay231129-1-101
The Earl W. Oglebay was set to depart its winter berth at Fraser Shipyard today, leaving only the Reserve and the American Mariner still in port from the winter layup. It was going to go to Silver Bay to load taconite, but two thousand footers got on the Silver Bay schedule, pushing the 630 foot boat off the list, or at least down. The Coast Guard cutter Mackinaw, the 60 year old cutter, is still breaking thick ice on each side of the Soo Locks in Whitefish Bay and in the St. Mary’s River. Some folks at that end of the Lake are blaming our end of the lake for all their ice. Instead of east winds bringing the ice to us, west winds have sent ice eastward to the Soo, although we didn’t have much ice to send. The crew aboard the Mackinaw are not complaining. The ship will be decommissioned in June and turning the ice breaking duties over to a brand new Mackinaw. They were afraid they would not get any ice breaking in before the ship becomes a museum. While we will not see the old Mackinaw again, we can be proud that we sent them enough ice to give the Mighty Mac one last shot before it retires.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/1/2006

American Mariner prop inspection

americanmariner260227-1-106
When the James R. Barker leaves sometime today with its second load of coal for Presque Isle, Michigan, there will still be 10 boats at their winter layup berths in Duluth Superior. One of them is the American Mariner, above. It was in dry dock at the Fraser Shipyard in Superior, allowing workers to check on the boat’s prop and rudder.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 03-17-2006

American Mariner welcomed

americanmariner220718-102
The American Mariner makes its 7th visit today. The name comes from the owner, the American Steamship Company of Buffalo, and the crew on the boat. It was supposed to be called the Chicago when it was launched in 1980 but at the last moment, the name was changed to American Mariner. Photo taken July 18, 2000.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-29-2005

American Mariner visits many ports

americanmariner220625-141
The American Mariner has visited these Great Lakes ports so far this year: Ashland, Ashtabula, Charlevoix, Cleveland, Conneaut, Drummond, Escanaba, Grand Haven, Green Bay, Harbor Beach, Indiana Harbor, Lackawanna, Lorain, Marquette, Meldrum Bay, Monroe, Munising, Muskegon, Ontonagon, Port Inland, Presque Isle, Sandusky, Silver Bay, South Chicago, Stoneport, Superior, Toledo, Zug Island and Duluth. Photo taken June 25, 2002.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 07-29-2005

American Mariner honors the crew

americanmariner220625-141
The American Mariner is owned and operated by the American Steamship Company of Buffalo. That is the source of the first part of the boat’s name. The second part refers to the mariners who work on the boat. It was supposed to be called the Chicago when it was launched in 1980 but at the last moment, the name was changed to American Mariner. Photo taken June 25, 2002.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-18-2005

American Mariner greeted in Duluth

americanmariner220718-102
The American Mariner is owned and operated by the American Steamship Company of Buffalo, New York. That is also the source of the first part of her name. The second part of the name refers to the mariners who work on the boat. It has been the American Mariner since it was launched in 1980. It was supposed to be called the Chicago but at the last moment, I am told because of a Chicago political squabble, the name was changed to the current name.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-21-2005

American Mariner greets spectators

americanmariner220718-102
The American Mariner is owned and operated by the American Steamship Company of Buffalo, New York. That is also the source of the first part of her name. The second part of the name refers to the mariners who work on the boat. It has been the American Mariner since it was launched in 1980. It was supposed to be called the Chicago but at the last moment, I am told because of a Chicago political squabble, the name was changed to the current name. Photo taken July 18, 2000.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 01-06-2005

American Mariner brings limestone

americanmariner220625-141
On this trip, the American Mariner is bringing in limestone and then loading taconite for Indiana Harbor, a port on Lake Michigan. While not a frequent visitor, that is the boat’s usual pattern when it is here. In late October this year however, it came in to discharge limestone and then load coal for a quick trip to Ashland. It was soon back in Duluth, this time loading taconite for Indiana Harbor. Photo taken June 25, 2002.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 11-18-2004

American Mariner will take taconite out

americanmariner220625-141
The American Mariner will be here today to discharge limestone before moving over to the DM&IR Dock in West Duluth to pick up a cargo of taconite. Owned by the American Steamship Company, it takes its name from the company and the mariners who work on the ship. Photo taken June 25, 2002.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-20-2004