D. L. Billmaier

D. L. Billmaier was built in 1968, is 108.5 feet long and flies a U.S. flag

Previous names:
Natchitoches (YTB-799): 1968-1995
D.L. Billmaier: 1995-

Click here for other pages featuring the D.L. Billmaier

The tug D. L. Billmaier was built in 1969. It is often towing the derrick barge H. J. Schwartz and sometimes other barges behind it as it is used by the Corps of Engineers in breakwater repair and maintenance at ports on Lake Michigan and Lake Superior. Its home port is Duluth. Picture at right taken September 13, 2004
2008
On September 23, 2008 above, the Billmaier is pulling the derrick barge H.J. Schwartz and two other barges through the Duluth ship canal.
2005
Above, the Billmaier passes the Paul R. Tregurtha departing Duluth on May 4, 2005
2004
The tug D. L. Billmaier led (and was pulling) a procession of Corps vessels into the Duluth ship canal on September 13, 2004 (above). They were returning from Ashland, Wisconsin where they were working on a breakwall. The Billmaier is pulling the crane barge H.J. Schwartz with 2 barges behind her. One of the barges was empty. It left here full of rocks that were used in Ashland to strengthen the breakwall. Barely seen above behind the barges is the tug Hammond Bay which was originally the tug that was going to be placed in front of the Marine Museum. The Corps decided to repower that tug and kept it in active service. The tug Bayfield now sits in the front yard of the Marine Museum. The Hammond Bay, at the end of the procession, is easily seen in the picture below, as they moved into the Duluth harbor. It was used as a utility vessel.
2001
The Billmaier is escorting the Schwartz into the Corps of Engineers vessel yard on Park Point on June 14, 2001.

D. L. Billmaier was built in 1968, is 108.5 feet long and flies a U.S. flag

Previous names:
Natchitoches (YTB-799): 1968-1995
D.L. Billmaier: 1995-

Click here for other pages featuring the D.L. Billmaier

The tug D. L. Billmaier was built in 1969. It is often towing the derrick barge H. J. Schwartz and sometimes other barges behind it as it is used by the Corps of Engineers in breakwater repair and maintenance at ports on Lake Michigan and Lake Superior. Its home port is Duluth. Picture at right taken September 13, 2004
2008
On September 23, 2008 above, the Billmaier is pulling the derrick barge H.J. Schwartz and two other barges through the Duluth ship canal.
2005
Above, the Billmaier passes the Paul R. Tregurtha departing Duluth on May 4, 2005
2004
The tug D. L. Billmaier led (and was pulling) a procession of Corps vessels into the Duluth ship canal on September 13, 2004 (above). They were returning from Ashland, Wisconsin where they were working on a breakwall. The Billmaier is pulling the crane barge H.J. Schwartz with 2 barges behind her. One of the barges was empty. It left here full of rocks that were used in Ashland to strengthen the breakwall. Barely seen above behind the barges is the tug Hammond Bay which was originally the tug that was going to be placed in front of the Marine Museum. The Corps decided to repower that tug and kept it in active service. The tug Bayfield now sits in the front yard of the Marine Museum. The Hammond Bay, at the end of the procession, is easily seen in the picture below, as they moved into the Duluth harbor. It was used as a utility vessel.
2001
The Billmaier is escorting the Schwartz into the Corps of Engineers vessel yard on Park Point on June 14, 2001.