Caught by a wind turbine base unit

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While out for a run today, I looked behind me and saw a wind turbine base unit gaining on me. Duluth is an important hub, connecting the middle of the United States with the rest of the world and connecting ships, trains and trucks here in Duluth. This base unit probably came here in June on the Sjard.

Sjard wind turbine discharge in Duluth Minnesota

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The Sjard blew into town last night with wind turbine parts she is discharging at the Port Terminal. She is one of many BBC ships that have been coming to Duluth for many years, although she does not carry the letters BBC in her name as did her sister ship the BBC Haren, in town in late May.
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More wind turbine blades for Minnesota Power

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HHL Tyne arrived under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge in the early evening of August 26, 2015 with her deck piled high with wind turbine blades.
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More wind turbines in Duluth

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The HHL Elbe arrived Wednesday afternoon, August 6, 2015 with wind turbine parts to discharge at the Port Terminal. Built in 2008, this is her first visit to the Twin Ports. When she completes discharging the wind turbine pieces, she will go over to CHS in Superior to load grain as her departing cargo.
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HHL Amur, under Bridge, into slip

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The HHL Amur arrived under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge on Friday afternoon, July 17, 2015 at 1:45 with wind turbine blades on her deck. She is now discharging them at the Port Terminal. (Two images above courtesy of Dave Campbell; click pics for larger versions)
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HHL Volga brings more wind turbine blades to Duluth

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After half a day at the outside anchorage, the HHL Volga came in Sunday afternoon, June 28, 2015, with a cargo of wind turbine blades she will begin discharging on Monday morning. She is the former Beluga Family when she was operated by Beluga Shipping in Bremen, Germany. After Beluga went bankrupt, the ship was purchased by Hansa Heavy Lift, also in Bremen. Although many Beluga ships have been to Duluth before, this will be the first visit for this ship. This is, I think, the 3rd shipment of wind turbine pieces to come to Duluth this season. There are more coming.

Clipper Makiri arrives Duluth with blades

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The Clipper Makiri arrived Sunday night at 11:41 with wind turbine blades she loaded in China and some machinery she picked up in Thailand. This is her first trip to the Twin Ports. She was built in 1999 as the Makiri Green. She then sailed as the Sloman Server until 2012 when she became the Mikiri Green again. Her name was recently changed to Clipper Makiri. She was a member of the Dutch shipping company Green Fleet and still sailing with her green colors. Many Green Fleet ships have visited Duluth in the past, although this is the first trip here for the Clipper Makiri.

Wind turbine blades again

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After several days at anchor, the salt water ship Johanna C came into port on Sunday afternoon, May 3, 2015. After going under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge, the Heritage Marine tug Helen H. moved up to help her make her dock at the Port Terminal. On Monday, workers at Lake Superior Warehousing Company, at the Port Terminal, will begin discharging the wind turbine blades.
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Wind turbine blades at anchor off Duluth piers

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On April 18th, the Johanna C (above) was off just off the coast of Newfoundland and due in Montreal on the 19th on her way to Duluth. She arrived Montreal on the 21st. By the 26th, she was in the Welland Canal, at Detroit on the 27th and at the Soo Locks on the 28th. She arrived off the Duluth piers last night (April 29th) as the sun was setting and dropped her anchor.She has wind turbine blades on her deck, the first to come to Duluth in several years. She is in the anchorage waiting for the Lady Doris (below) to complete her discharge of clay at the port terminal.
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Peter Rönna here with wind turbine parts

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The Peter Rönna arrived this morning (above) on her first visit to the Twin Ports. She brought the 15th shipment of wind turbine parts to come here by ship for Minnesota Power. They loaded the cargo in Brande, Denmark, where the equipment is manufactured by Siemens. After the equipment is discharged here, trucks will take the over 2 dozen pieces to the Bison Wind Energy Center near New Salem, N.D. As she moved up the Duluth harbor, she was greeted by the departing Roger Blough, going to Two Harbors to load iron ore pellets after some repairs were made at Fraser Shipyards.
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Atlanticborg departs with wind turbine blades

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The Atlanticborg arrived Duluth on July 8, 2012 with a cargo of wind turbine blades loaded in Denmark. After discharge here, the blades will go by truck to a Minnesota Power wind farm in North Dakota.
She then moved out to the anchorage off the Duluth piers for a few days, coming back in on July 15, 2012 to load wind turbine blades built in North Dakota that she took to Brazil.
The two wind turbine shipments the Atlanticborg carried are totally separate. It is a coincidence that both cargos on the ship were wind turbine blades and also that the inbound cargo went to North Dakota and the outbound cargo came from North Dakota. Go here for more pictures of the Atlanticborg loading these blades at Lake Superior Warehousing Company at the Port Terminal. Above and below, the Atlanticborg departed the port for Brazil on July 17, 2012.
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Containers first, then blades

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The Atlanticborg arrived under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge this morning (Sunday, July 8, 2012) at 2:59. Workers at Lake Superior Warehousing Company began to discharge her at 8 am.

Atlanticborg coming our way with blades

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Kent Malo took this photo of the Atlanticborg on her way to Duluth from a  Cessna 172 at 1500 feet. She will be here early Sunday morning with a cargo of wind turbine blades loaded in Denmark. After discharge here, they will be taken to a Minnesota Power wind farm in North Dakota. When discharge is completed, she will go to anchor for about a week, then coming back in to load wind turbine blades, built in North Dakota and going to Brazil.

Next stop: Brazil

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The Alamosborg departed Duluth late Friday afternoon, June 29, 2012

Blades to Brazil

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The Alamosborg is now (June 28, 2012) at the Port Terminal loading 60 wind turbine blades. She was here a week ago to discharge wind turbine parts she brought into port. After that, she left the Port Terminal dock to go to the anchorage and wait for the Flinterstar to complete discharging her cargo of wind turbine blades. She then came back in to load 60 wind turbine blades manufactured in North Dakota and going to a wind farm in Brazil. Yesterday, they were loading the blades into the ship’s cargo hold below deck. Today, they are placing the last blades on the weather deck of the ship. It should be a good sight to see when they depart the port, probably on Friday.
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Note that each blade includes a stabilizer which is used to stack the blades on top of each other while underway. They of course will be removed at the site in Brazil.
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Flinterstar brings wind turbine blades

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After waiting at anchor for a few days, the Flinterstar came into port on Sunday evening, June 24, 2012. On Monday morning, she was at the Port Terminal dock discharging her cargo of wind turbine blades and nacelles.
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Alamosborg waits for the rains to stop

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Rains came to Duluth; the ships are still on the water but the workers stayed  home, as the Mayor asked. The Alamosborg is at the Port Terminal, waiting for better weather tomorrow, and some folks back to help her discharge her wind turbine pieces.

HHL Congo brings blades to Duluth

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The HHL Congo arrived in Duluth on May 19, 2012 (below) with a cargo of wind turbine blades. She was assisted by the Heritage Marine tug Nels J. Launched in 2011 as the Beluga Fealty, this was the HHL Congo’s first trip to Duluth Superior. Above, one of the blades is lifted from the ship’s cargo hold at the Port Terminal.
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Americaborg brings wind turbine parts

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The Americaborg came into port on May 15, 2012 with wind turbine pieces built in Denmark by Siemens Wind Power. Above, a nacelle has just been discharged from her cargo hold and deposited on ‘Big Red’ for the short trip to the other end of the Port Terminal. After all wind turbine pieces had been discharged, she moved over to the CHS 1 terminal in Superior to load grain. She may leave on Sunday although weather may delay her departure.

Adriaticborg brings more wind turbine parts

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The Adriaticborg arrived on November 2, 2011 to discharge wind turbine parts adriaticborg20111103_6421loaded in Aarhus, Denmark. She brought 15 hubs, 3 power units and one 20 foot container; the cargo was loaded in Aarhus, Denmark for Siemens. Wind turbine technology keeps advancing. These hubs are bigger than earlier ones and they have to be plugged in at almost all times so bearings inside do not go flat during transit. As soon as the cranes dropped each hub at Lake adriaticborg20111103_6442Superior Warehousing this morning, they were plugged into an electrical connection prepared by the warehouse. The power slowly moves the inside around, keeping the bearings smooth. Earlier nacelles came here in August with radiators to cool off a new type of motor inside. Odd; all this stuff requires electricity; wind mills aren’t what they used to be!

Wind turbine blades on the way

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We haven’t had any shipments of wind turbine blades in the port for more than a year, but we have had some stored on the ground from past deliveries over at Lake Superior Warehousing Company at the Port Terminal. Today (Thursday, September 8, 2011), the last of those were loaded onto trucks.They will take them to wind farms in Illinois. During the time they have been stored here, they have actually been sold to new customers, rather than the customers who originally ordered them. Delays, construction issues and the poor economy have kept the wind turbine business in flux.  (Click pic for larger version)
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Federal Power, a truck and a big wind turbine blade mold

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The Federal Power brought wind turbine pieces from Denmark, arriving in Duluth on June 8, 2011. Top left, you see 3 wind turbine molds on the ship’s weather deck. At right, on Thursday, June 9, the Port Terminal’s 2 gantry cranes discharged them onto a special service truck (top right). Below, the truck slowly moved each piece out of the warehouse yard and made the wide turn onto the road that led them to the other side of the Port Terminal where they were carefully laid down. (Click any picture for larger version)
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On Friday, work continued bring pieces from the ship’s cargo holds. Above, 3 hubs can be seen with one nacelle in the foreground and some of the 150   containers also loaded onto the ship in Denmark. Below, in the engine room, engineers did some work on the big diesel engine that powers the ship.
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First wind turbine shipment of season

bbcoregon20110425_2237 At the left, on Monday morning, April 25, one of the Port Terminal cranes is pulling one of the 100 power units brought here by the BBC Oregon for Siemens. Power units contain the brains of the wind turbine, calculating the many variables, like the wind, that are checked to make adjustments to the turbine, such as the pitch of the blades.
Yesterday, on a sunny Sunday Easter morning, the BBC Oregon arrived in port with a shipment of wind turbine parts loaded in Aarhus, Denmark. After discharging the parts (nacelles, power units, hubs and containerized equipment), destined to go by truck to Adair, Iowa, she will load wheat at the CHS terminal in Superior.
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Two ships in Duluth, both with wind turbine parts loaded in Aarhus, Denmark.

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The BBC Volga is discharging wind turbine parts loaded in Aarhus, Denmark. The parts will be taken by truck to Minnesota and Manitoba. The Avonborg, sitting just in front of  the BBC Volga, had just finished doing the same thing except all her cargo will be going to Manitoba.

Wind turbine parts by train

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A train loaded wind turbine parts in California and brought them to Superior and then over the Grassy Point Bridge to Duluth and to Lake Superior Warehousing. There the pieces were taken off the rail cars in the same place they take them off the ships. They were then taken by truck to another part of the Warehouse and put in lay-by until they will be picked up and loaded onto trucks for the trip to the final destination in Manitoba. The picture shows 2 views of the train approaching the 27th Ave bridge over I-35. They had crossed over the Grassy Point Bridge about 45 minutes earlier.

Containers to Duluth

bbcrhine20100902_4023Duluth is not a container port; container ships are usually too large to get through the canals and lock systems on the Great Lakes. But we do get containers. The BBC Rhine came here on September 2, 2010 with wind turbine parts loaded in Aarhus, Denmark for Manitoba. In addition to 20 large base units below deck in her cargo holds, on her deck at the bow of the ship was a large stack of containers. It turns out you need more than the big pieces to put a wind turbine together; all the smaller pieces are delivered to the final site in containers.
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BBC Sweden delivers wind turbine hubs …

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… to Duluth on June 12, 2010. Employees at Lake Superior Warehousing are seen moving a hub into place on a shuttle trailer that took the piece to another part of the warehouse (above). Gantry crane #1 was used. At left, you see the crane pulling another piece from the BBC Sweden’s cargo hold. The base support of crane #1 is at right of picture. This is the second of 2 shipments to Duluth from Siemens in Denmark. See Metsaborg discharge HERE. Both shipments were taken to Wyoming.

Wind turbine train ready to go

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Last minute touches were being taken care of on the wind turbine train on Thursday night at the Port Terminal. Meanwhile, the Indiana Harbor was tying up at Murphy Fuel after loading coal at Midwest Energy. The train is expected to leave the Port Terminal around 8 am on Friday morning.

Building a wind turbine train!

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The Metsaborg brought wind turbine parts from Denmark to Duluth, arriving here on Sunday, May 16th. The parts, as well as 48 containers, were discharged from the ship onto shuttle trucks that moved them to another part of the Port Terminal. This week, those pieces were loaded onto railroad cars for the trip west. A nacelle is in the foreground; behind each nacelle is a cone. The train is expected to depart Thursday late afternoon or early evening, moving down the rail line just east of I-35 to the Grassy Point Bridge and over to Superior.

Lifting wind turbine parts from the Metsaborg

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Morning on Wednesday, May 19. Each gantry crane has a hold at each end of the bar being used to lift a nacelle from the cargo hold of the Metsaborg (inset). The cranes slowly lift the nacelle out of the hold, over the deck of the ship, and onto a waiting trailer truck.

First wind turbine boat of the season

metzaborg2010-05-16_0014_edThe Metsaborg arrived Duluth early evening on Sunday, May 16, 2010 with the port’s first shipment of wind turbine parts (left). The ship was loaded in Denmark about three weeks ago and came directly to Duluth. Early Monday morning, employees from Lake Superior Warehousing Company began to discharge the cargo. First off were 48 containers, many loaded onto the weather deck of the ship. Gantry crane #1 is seen below pulling one of the containers off the deck. Crane #2 can be partially seen at the upper left picture.
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BBC Italy becomes the last saltwater ship of the season

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With cold weather and ice in the Seaway, and after many delays, the BBC Spain, originally headed for the Twin Ports, will divert to Texas to discharge her wind turbine equipment. When the BBC Italy departs Duluth, perhaps on Friday, she will be the last saltwater ship of the season. She arrived here on Sunday to discharge wind turbine parts. Above, the discharge continued into Monday. She is now loading grain at Harvest States.

The BBC Italy finally arrived in Duluth …

bbcitaly20091213_0056 … with wind turbine components to be discharged at Lake Superior Warehousing Company at the Port Terminal on Sunday, December 13, 2009.

Wind turbines for Chile

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One of 40 wind turbine blades built in Grand Forks and going to Chile is hoisted off a a trailer and into the BBC Amazon this morning (June 9, 2009), all this at the Port Terminal in Duluth. You can see another trailer with another blade to be loaded into the ship at the lower left of the picture.

A different kind of ship comes to Duluth

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The Kent Trader arrived Duluth on October 5, 2008 with her cargo holds filled with 29 Gamesa nacelles loaded in Spain. For many years, salt water ships visiting Duluth have had their superstructure (pilot house and crew quarters, office and galley) at the stern of the ship. You will note in the picture above that the superstructure on the Kent Trader is in the middle. I am told this ship, built in 1986 at 403 feet long, was built for loading rolled paper but no one on board could remember when it last carried that cargo. Nor have they ever seen another ship like it except for a sister ship to this one. Fourteen nacelles were loaded behind the pilot house and 15 more nacelles were loaded in front of it.
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The nacelle above is being pulled from the cargo hold of the ship by the 2 Port Terminal gantry cranes (see below). They  slowly brought it over the side of the ship for placement on a waiting trailer for transport to another area of the Port Terminal.
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More wind turbine equipment for Duluth

kenttrader2008Oct04_3446 The Kent Trader arrived Duluth on Friday night, October 3rd. On Saturday morning, Lake Superior Warehousing began to discharge the cargo of 29 Gamesa nacelles loaded in Spain. The morning started out with a heavy fog but it soon cleared. The nacelle above has just been pulled from the cargo hold of the ship and the 2 gantry cranes are slowing bringing it over the side of the ship for placement on a waiting trailer for transport to another area of the Port Terminal.

Asiaborg discharges nacelles and hubs

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On Monday and Tuesday, longshoremen at the Port Terminal discharged 37 wind turbine nacelles from the Asiaborg, each with a hub attached. Together, they will sit at the top of the finished wind turbine. The nacelle, with the company name, Acciona on it, holds the machinery for the wind turbine; the hub will hold the 3 blades. They are together for the trip over from Spain only because it was easier to load the ship that way. The piece as you see it will not fit on the truck that will soon carry each piece to wind farms in Montana, Oklahoma and Illinois. The piece in the picture will be taken to another area of the Port Terminal where it will be taken apart. The hubs will not necessarily be reunited with the nacelles they came with. Once separated, they are just interchangeable parts. Eighteen of the nacelles and 18 of the hubs will be taken to Illinois and 18 of each will go to Oklahoma; one pair will go to Montana. The special rigging just above the nacelle was sent here by Acciona just for lifting these pieces. Photo taken on September 30, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 10-01-2008

Flinterland on her way

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The Flinterland departed Duluth on Thursday afternoon with a ship full of blades. Most every available space in its two cargo holds and up on deck, see above, was filled with wind turbine blades going to Brazil. I am assured that the boat is very seaworthy but it doesn’t look like it when you consider it is going into the Atlantic Ocean and then turning right for Brazil. Along the way, they will be sailing right into the waters that kick up hurricanes this time of year. I am assured this is not a problem but wind turbine blades are built to catch wind and with that many blades on deck to catch the wind, it would seem like they could fly down to Brazil. They have several private services that watch the weather closely and send them advisories that include updated tracks they should follow to avoid difficult weather. They are also advised where the ship should go to wait out a storm, and I assume it tells them when to go to those places in time to get there. Photo taken on August 28, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-29-2008

Marlene Green with wind turbine base units

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There is not a lot of ship traffic for the Twin Ports today and even less than usual for the Duluth entry since the Lift Bridge will be closed for the Fireworks from 9 pm tonight to 1 am Saturday. The Paul R. Tregurtha should be coming under the bridge this morning but may have to leave using the Superior entry in the evening. The last of the two wind turbine ships, the Marlene Green, was expected to complete their cargo discharge yesterday and may have already departed the port. Above, on Thursday morning, the Port Terminal gantry crane hoisted a wind turbine base unit from the cargo hold of the Marlene Green and is about to set it on a waiting truck.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 07-04-2008

BBC Rosario with wind turbine pieces

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The BBC Rosario was expected to complete discharging its cargo of wind turbine pieces last night. It has likely departed the port and the Marlene Green should be beginning to discharge its cargo of wind turbine base units this morning. Above, the port gantry crane has just lowered a wind turbine base unit from the deck of the BBC Rosario onto the truck on Monday evening. The truck is taking the piece to a laydown area in another part of the Port Terminal. Just above the cab on the truck, you can see the BBC Rosario’s hatch cover open so the crane can pull the pieces from the ship’s cargo hold.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 07-02-2008

Marlene Green here with tower sections

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Three salt water ships came into port on Sunday, two of them brought wind turbine parts. The BBC Rosario, making its first visit to the Twin Ports, brought pieces built by Siemens in Denmark. The Marlene Green arrived in the morning (above) with 42 tower sections built by General Electric and headed eventually for wind farms in Minnesota and Iowa. Discharge of the BBC Rosario begins this morning.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-30-2008

Asiaborg here 2nd time this season

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We have only had 18 foreign flagged vessels visit the Twin Ports this season. The Asiaborg is trying to help. It will be here early this afternoon for the second time. It will bring wind turbine parts from Europe as it did on its first trip here in early May. It will have to wait for the BBC Elbe to complete discharging the wind turbine parts it brought in this morning.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-19-2008

BBC Ontario

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The BBC Ontario came into port on June 13th to discharge 11 component sets (minus blades) of Siemens wind turbines loaded in Denmark. Each wind turbine has a cone shaped piece, called a spinner. It sits just in front of the hub, the piece that holds the three blades. The BBC Ontario had 11 spinners in their cargo hold. Above, you see the Port Terminal crane yesterday placing the last of 3 spinners it lifted out of the ship’s cargo hold onto a waiting truck that will carry them to another part of the Port Terminal. They will eventually go to a wind farm in Shelby, Montana. There is a delay at that work site, in part caused by the weather so the number of wind turbine pieces that have been discharged from ships here but are still waiting at the Port Terminal to be shipped to their final destination increases.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-16-2008

Liamare here with wind turbine parts

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For several years, the tug W. N. Twolan was a somewhat regular visitor to the Twin Ports, bringing a variety of wood products down from Thunder Bay and on rare occasions, taking another wood product back to Thunder Bay. The Twolan was not here at all last year, but is expected in port today with a barge full of baled wood pulp. That will be discharged at the Port Terminal. Another vessel will also be discharging cargo at the Port Terminal today. The Dutch flagged Liamare came into port on Sunday afternoon (above) with another load of wind mill parts.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-02-2008

Beluga Enterprise here with wind turbine parts from Spain

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Duluth is selling iron ore pellets and coal today. We are buying wind turbine parts. It’s not our iron ore or coal; we are just holding it for taconite mines on the iron range and coal mines in Wyoming and Montana. In return for the coal that Montana is sending us to pass on to Michigan and Ontario, the Beluga Enterprise arrived today (above) with wind turbine parts loaded in Spain and going by truck from Duluth to Shelby, Montana. In the picture above, you are looking up at the deck of the Beluga Enterprise at three wind turbine tower sections about to be picked up by the Port Authority cranes and placed onto waiting trailers.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-31-2008

Asiaborg brings wind turbine to Duluth

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The Asiaborg came under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge on May 7th, 2008 and encountered a traffic jam as she turned up the Duluth harbor. The CSL Assiniboine (in the rear at right) came into port at 4:25 pm, the Asiaborg (at left) arrived at 4:37 and the John J. Boland came between them before going under the Lift Bridge at 5:03.
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After the Asiaborg got through the ‘situation’, top, she moved into the port terminal to discharge wind trubine parts from Denmark. They were taken by truck to a wind farm in Iowa. Above, a nacelle is slowly discharged from the Asiaborg by the two Port Terminal cranes working in tandem.
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Asiaborg here with wind turbine blades

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The Asiaborg came into port Wednesday afternoon (above) with another cargo of wind turbine parts built by Siemens in Denmark and destined to go by truck to a wind farm in Iowa. Many previous wind turbine shipments arrived in Duluth with wind turbine blades on the deck. They were quite a sight. This ship has all the parts for wind turbines except the blades. The Asiaborg deck is loaded with base units. Three of them are used to form the base for one wind turbine. Later today, the BBC Europe will be here to load beet pulp pellets. Several years ago, Mr. Wagenborg said he would consider it when someone suggested they name a ship Duluthborg. So far no Duluthborg and no BBC Duluth.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-08-2008

BBC Zarate arrives with wind turbine parts

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The BBC Zarate arrived Thursday morning (above) to discharge wind turbine parts loaded in Denmark. Longshoremen at Lake Superior Warehousing Company should complete that job this afternoon. The ship will then be cleaned and readied to load grain at AGP. It will follow the Federal Mattawa there. Progress with both ships may be limited by weather.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-03-2008

Beluga Expectation brings big stuff

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Wind turbine towers are large cylinders that hold wind turbine blades and other hardware high up where the wind can do its work. For months, wind turbine towers have been coming into Duluth by ship and by truck, from the east and from the north. Lately we have been sending many of them south to Iowa and east to Buffalo. The one above, and 44 others, came from Spain on the Beluga Expectation and will soon be going to a wind farm in Illinois. We have so many here waiting to go somewhere that they are being moved by truck to a new holding area between slips C and D. The picture above shows the first tower section moved there on Sunday. The Port Authority gantry cranes had just lifted it out of the ship’s hold and placed it on a trailer truck that took it down a specially built road to the new site. The crane next to it had just lifted it off the trailer and placed it on the ground. They are waiting for the next one. They hope to finish tonight. Photo taken on June 24, 2007.  You can see more pictures here: http://www.lswci.com/belugaexpectation2007.html
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-25-2007

S. Pacific brings wind turbine parts

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That’s Kirk Teschner high in gantry crane number 1 at Lake Superior Warehousing Company at the Port Terminal on Friday morning. At the other end is a wind turbine hub being lifted out of the S. Pacific. The ship loaded wind turbine parts in Spain. They will be taken from Duluth by truck to wind farms in Iowa and Illinois. They hope to complete discharging the S. Pacific late Saturday. The Beluga Expectation is next. It was expected in port last night and is filled the wind turbine base units. The S. Pacific will go next to General Mills to load beet pulp pellets. Next week, after the base units are discharged, the Beluga Expectation will head for Thunder Bay to load grain.
Photo taken on June 22, 2007.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-23-2007

S. Pacific in Duluth

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In 2005, 7 boats arrived from the BBC Chartering & Logistic Company in Leer, Germany. I doubt I was alone in wondering at first why the British Broadcasting Company had gone into the shipping business. The BBC England even made two visits here and it had nothing to do with the British Broadcasting Company. The next year, 5 BBC ships made at least one visit to the Twin Ports, but until today, we had seen none this season. The BBC Mexico has nothing to do with Mexico but it will be here today to load bentonite and may depart this evening. Meanwhile, the S. Pacific, a ship that was here once last year to load wheat, arrived last night (above) to discharge wind turbine parts at the Port Terminal. Photo taken on June 21, 2007.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-22-2007

Chase car and dog assist with Umiavut discharging

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The Dutch flagged Umiavut has been discharging parts for 32 wind turbines that will next go to a wind farm in Iowa. But first, each piece was discharged from the ship to trailer trucks that carried the pieces to another part of the Port Terminal where they will soon be put back on trucks and taken south. The pieces are big and very heavy and they need a big, specially built trailer truck to move them. And big very heavy trailer trucks need a chase car behind them to alert traffic coming up on them and to give the driver another set of eyes at the end of the very long trailer. That’s Stacy Wudtke in the driver’s seat of the chase car for one of the many half-mile trips they made on Friday from one end of the Port Authority terminal to the other. Her dog Tyler takes up the back seat, and Gus Johnson is to her left. Both work for Badger Transport Inc. in Clintonville, Wisconsin. Stacy lives in Montana. Photo taken on June 15, 2007.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-16-2007

Umiavut unloading at LSW

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The Dutch flagged Umiavut arrived in Duluth at 7:36 this morning. Shortly after tying up at the Lake Superior Warehousing berth at the Port Terminal, longshoremen, along with the ship’s crew, began to discharge parts for 32 wind turbines that will be taken by truck to wind farms in Iowa and Illinois. Above, they have just discharged one nacelle onto a trailer that departed for Iowa just after this picture was taken. The port’s 2 gantry cranes are turned toward the ship, dropping rigging into the ship’s cargo hold to pull up another nacelle. A nacelle is an enclosure for much of the machinery needed to operate the wind turbine. Photo taken June 14, 2007.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-15-2007

Busch Buffalo bound

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The tug Gregory J. Busch came into port a couple days ago to load wind turbine base units built by DMI Industries in West Fargo, North Dakota. They were brought down here by truck. For two days, longshoremen at Lake Superior Warehousing have been loading those units onto the barge the Busch brought with it. Specially built hardware was attached to each piece and the port’s two gantry cranes slowly lifted the piece, with hardware, onto the barge. Above, you can see they were starting on the second, and last, tier yesterday, using the hardware to connect the first tier units with those on the second tier. When they complete loading the barge, possibly later today, they will depart the port for Buffalo where the base units will be discharged onto trucks and taken to a wind farm in upper New York State. Photo taken on June 01, 2007.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-02-2007

Adam E. Cornelius departs in April ice

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We load a lot of ships here for some exotic ports, such as Algeria, Iceland, the South coast of France and Venezuela to name a few. And with apologies to the following, we also load cargo for less exotic ports on the Great Lakes, such as Lorain, Ohio or Gary, Indiana. But I never thought of Buffalo as a major destination for our cargo ships but today, it is. The Adam E. Cornelius should be departing Duluth later today with wheat for General Mills in Buffalo. That is work that was handled by the Kinsman Independent for many years. The tug Gregory J. Busch arrived here yesterday with a barge ready to be loaded with wind turbine base units. They were built by DMI Industries in West Fargo and sent here by truck. The tug was here late last year to take one load of base units to Buffalo but bad weather kept if from making a second trip. Today, it is here for that second trip and it should be back for more wind turbine base units, all of which will be shipped out of Buffalo to wind turbine farms in upper New York state. Above, the Cornelius departs Duluth with wheat for Buffalo on April 11th this year.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-01-2007

LSW and Tatjana exchange wind turbine blades

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That’s Lake Superior Warehousing Company’s lead stevedore, Tim Rogers, watching over the activity there on Friday morning. That’s the German flag flying in front of the US flag in honor of the cargo coming off the Tatjana yesterday. Behind Rogers, the last of 3 wind turbine blades is discharged from the ship to a waiting trailer. The blade is part of one wind turbine shipped here on the Tatjana from Rostock, Germany, by Nordex, a German company that builds wind turbines around the world, although this will be the first one they will build in the United States. The wind turbine will be taken by truck to Hewitt, Minnesota and should be operational in June. Minnesota Power will be the exclusive user of the electrical power generated by the wind turbines there. The Tatjana also carried steel products in its cargo hold, some of which was discharged in Hamilton. The rest of the steel will be discharged in Chicago. That’s where they were headed when they departed last night. When done there, they will return to Duluth to load grain. Photo taken on May 18, 2007.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 05-19-2007

Kwintebank at Port Terminal

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The port picked up a new type of business on Monday. The Kwintebank arrived from Milwaukee early Monday morning after discharging wind turbine parts. Wind turbine parts are often welded into place where ever they are loaded on a ship. That allows for no movement of the piece during transit, which allows the ship to be packed tighter, thus holding more cargo, always a good thing for the shipping company. The welds were not cleaned off in Milwaukee, so instead of going to General Mills to load beet pulp pellets for Spain, the Kwintebank went to the Port Terminal (above) where iron workers took their torches to the old welds. The ship should begin loading the pellets today.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 11-14-2006

BBC India taking on cargo

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Siemens, in Denmark, filled the BBC India with the parts to 22 wind turbines, a total of 174 pieces weighing 8,039,321 pounds and sent the ship off to Duluth. A lot of hardware, owned by Siemens, was needed to pack those pieces in the ship tightly and safely. The BBC India will be returning those pieces to Siemens. Some of that stuff was placed in containers. In the picture above, a container is being placed on the deck of the ship on Thursday. The container is at the end of a cable connected to one of the Port Terminal’s 2 gantry cranes. The other crane is at the top left. The picture was taken from the bow of the ship. You can see some of the rope used to tie the ship up to the dock. The top of the ship’s pilot house is at top center. Before arriving in Denmark, the ship will drop off electrical housing components in Iceland (they will be loaded onto the deck today), and grain in Ghent, Belgium. The grain was loaded earlier this week at CHS in Superior, after the wind turbine parts were discharged.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 09-29-2006

Primary 1 / Gregory J. Busch

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The barge Primary 1 was loaded on Saturday with 12 wind turbine base units brought here from North Dakota (above). The tug Gregory J. Busch should be pushing the barge out into the lake today on its way to Buffalo where the base units will be taken to a wind farm being built in Upper New York State. This combination took the place of the BBC India which just finished discharging wind turbine units loaded in Denmark and going to North Dakota. The BBC India, waiting to take the place of the Federal Agno which was delayed by weather loading grain at the CHS terminal in Superior, was tied up right next to the tug barge on Sunday. The Federal Agno may leave today, opening the berth to the BBC India. When the cargo holds are filled with grain, the BBC India will return to the Port Terminal to load large electrical components on the deck of the ship, taking them to Iceland on the way to discharging the grain cargo in Ghent, Belgium.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 09-25-2006

Gregory J. Busch / Primary 1

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After completing the discharge from the BBC India of 22 wind turbines on Thursday evening, longshoremen at Lake Superior Warehousing Company turned to loading wind turbine base units onto the barge Primary 1. It arrived in port, pushed by the tug Gregory J. Busch, on Friday morning. All the pieces were loaded on Saturday. After some finishing work on Monday, the tug barge combination should depart for Buffalo. The tug was built in Superior in 1919 as the Humaconna. In 1977, it became the Gregory J. Busch. It served many years in the Pacific Ocean off Puget Sound and up to Alaska. Above, it was at the Port Terminal loading the base units on Saturday.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 09-24-2006

BBC India discharges nacelles

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The BBC India completed discharging the parts for 22 wind turbines last night that will soon be shipped to a North Dakota wind farm built by Siemens. The electrical power generated there will be used by Minnesota Power to keep the lights of Minnesota bright. The last pieces to be brought out, from the bottom of the ship’s hold, were the nacelles, 22 of them. Above, one is being pulled out by the two Port Terminal gantry cranes yesterday. There are five more still sitting in the hold. The nacelle is a covering, or shell, that holds much of the machinery that operates the wind turbine. Doors on the top of the nacelle, here visible on the right side, are opened so that very strong cables hanging down from the crane can be connected to the nacelle so it can be pulled out of the hold. You can see more pictures at: www.lswci.com
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 09-22-2006

BBC India discharges onto truck

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The BBC India came back to Duluth on Monday afternoon and began discharging a cargo of wind turbine parts at the Port Terminal on Tuesday morning. The cargo hold on the ship contains parts for 22 wind turbines. With 3 blades per turbine, the ship brought 66 blades, lashed to the deck and some in the cargo hold below deck. They also brought 23 hubs, 23 nacelles, 23 spinners, 23 power units and 20 containers filled with smaller components. These parts will go by truck to North Dakota where Florida Light and Power will build and operate the wind turbines. It will all eventually come back to Minnesota since all the electrical power generated there will be purchased by Minnesota Power. Above, a blade is lowered from the ship to a waiting truck by the Port Terminal’s two gantry cranes.  Pictures of the discharge can be seen at the Lake Superior Warehousing Company page at: http://www.lswci.com/
[many more recent entries are there also]
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 09-20-2006

Magdalena Green brings wind turbine blades

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The Magdalena Green came into port on Wednesday with a cargo hold full of wind turbine parts, all destined to go to a wind farm in Mower County in Southern Minnesota. In this picture, 2 cranes at the Port Terminal (only one is visible) are lifting one of 60 wind turbine blades out of the ship’s hold and are slowly swinging it over the deck. Each blade is lowered onto a truck that takes the blade to another part of the Port Terminal where they are set down. In the coming weeks, each blade will be picked up and placed onto a truck, one blade per truck. They will then begin the final part of a long journey that began in Denmark where the wind turbines were built and loaded onto the ship.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 09-09-2006

Flinterspirit brings a crane

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The parts of 22 wind turbines came in and were discharged from the BBC India last week. Those pieces are now headed down to Mower County by truck. Last night, the crane that will be used to lift the pieces as they are building the wind turbines came into port aboard the Flinterspirit (above). Sixty-nine pieces will be discharged starting this morning. They will be sent by truck to Mower County. On other trips to the Twin Ports the Flinterspirit loaded Budweiser barley for England. The barley was good midwest barley and allowed Anheuser-Busch to claim that their beer is made from the same ingredients the world over. And it is, I saw it. But now the ship is hauling cranes around the world instead. The American Century can be seen behind the Flinterspirit, waiting at anchor for a dock.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-08-2006

BBC India discharging with crane assist

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Last September, the Federal Leda was here loading flax for Northern Europe. This year, it will load about 21,600 tons of taconite at Burlington Northern in Superior, only the 3rd ship to ever load taconite there, all this year. That cargo will go to Algeria. The BBC India came in here as a heavy cargo ship (above). It discharged that cargo (wind turbine parts from Denmark) and will now load grain at CHS in Superior. Both ships represent new trading patterns for salt water vessels coming to the Twin Ports.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-07-2006

Cranes lift blades from BBC India

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Two gantry cranes at the Port Terminal lifted the last of 66 wind turbine blades from the hold of the BBC India on Friday. They were discharged onto waiting flat bed trucks and moved over to temporary storage at the Port Terminal. The 66 wind turbine blades will be mounted on 22 towers, 3 blades for each tower in the wind farm being built in Mower County. Other pieces making up the shipment of wind turbine equipment are still being discharged from the ship, but should be completed this evening. Starting next week, the blades and other equipment will begin shipping out to Mower County by truck.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-05-2006

BBC India brought wind turbine parts

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Lots of U.S. flagged freighters, most of them 1,000-footers, will be coming and going today. While one salt water ship sits at anchor (Federal Leda), two are in port, one discharging wind turbine parts for Mower County and one loading wheat for Africa (Federal Miramichi). In the picture, a truck starts out from Clure Public Marine Terminal on Thursday morning, pulling an expandable flat bed trailer loaded with one of the almost 150 foot long wind turbine blades on it. It will take the blade to a wind turbine farm in Mower County, Minnesota. You can see the stern of the BBC India sticking up on the right. It brought the blades here from Denmark. Notice the ends of more blades on its deck pointing toward the stern from the right.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-04-2006

BBC India bridge to go under the Bridge

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The BBC India, expected here this morning, last came under the Lift Bridge 6 years ago yesterday. It was called the Maria Green then and was here to load grain. The picture shows a view of the bridge of the ship on that trip. It was sold in 2004 and received its current name. It is bringing cargo this time, wind turbine blades for a wind turbine farm in Waltham, Minnesota. The ship is also carrying 4 pieces for a crane that will be assembled and then used to assemble the wind turbine. Another ship will be here later this year with 69 more pieces of the crane.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-02-2006

BBC Shanghai cargo to Manitoba

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The BBC Shanghai has been discharging 24 wind turbine blades from the deck of the ship directly onto waiting trucks for transport to Manitoba. Above, one is slowly lifted from the stack by the ship’s on board cranes.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 07-12-2005

Cargo here via Bavaria

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Above, the Bavaria was here in April discharging wind turbine blades at the Port Terminal. Late this morning, we expect the BBC Shanghai to come into port with similar blades resting on the deck. It is worth seeing if you are in the neighborhood.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 07-08-2005

Ostkap unloads nacelles

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The Ostkap was here yesterday (above) discharging 18 nacelles and 18 wind turbine hubs at the Port Authority Terminal. A nacelle is the enclosure for much of the machinery needed to operate a wind turbine. Each nacelle weighs 113,427 pounds. Above, one of the nacelles is lifted from the Ostkap by one of the Port Authority cranes. The Ostkap is now loading spring wheat for Portugal.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 06-22-2005

Bavaria discharges wind turbine blades

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The first turbine blade is discharged from the Bavaria yesterday at the port terminal (above). Cranes from the ship slowly lowered the blades onto waiting trucks. The blades will next go to Canada for use on wind turbine towers (windmills). The Bavaria should finish up late this afternoon and will depart through the Duluth piers shortly thereafter.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/14/2005

Bavaria brings wind turbine blades

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The German flagged Bavaria always brings interesting cargo to Duluth. Today, it is windmill blades for Canada, although I am supposed to call them wind turbine blades.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/13/2005