Cornelia in, to replace the departing Federal Maas

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The Cornelia came in from her anchorage (above) this afternoon (November 10, 2016). After a short wait at the Port Terminal, she will move over to Riverland Ag this evening to replace the Federal Maas, that left the dock about an hour later going off to deliver her cargo.
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American Mariner departs while Cornelia waits, again!

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Before departing this morning (above, on October 30, 2016), the American Mariner arrived Duluth on Friday evening, October 28, 2016 to load wheat at the General Mills elevator in Superior.
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The Cornelia is at anchor off the Duluth piers waiting to come in to load grain. She arrived in the Twin Ports on October 16 with a cargo of cement she discharged at CRH, previously Holcim and before that St. Lawrence Cement. After discharging her cement cargo, she went out to the anchorage to wait before coming in for her grain cargo.
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The Mariner will carry her wheat cargo to Buffalo and discharge it at General Mills grain elevators there. This was her 11th trip here this season. On other trips, she has brought limestone and loaded coal or iron ore pellets. The Cornelia is here for her second time and her second time spending more than a few days at anchor. Last year, she had some legal difficulties that kept her out there for over 40 days. Since then, she was sold and is now free of any legal entanglements; just waiting and enjoying the weather.
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Skawa arrives Duluth

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The Skawa entered the Duluth ship canal late this afternoon, October 25, 2016, on her way to CHS 2 to load flax and wheat. Built in 2012, she is making her first trip to the Twin Ports. She is one of many we see here from Polish Steamship Company. The Skawa is a river in Southern Poland

Elbeborg in, Cornelia out (at anchorage) waiting

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The Elbeborg arrived Duluth on Friday, October 21, 2016 to load beet pulp pellets. Behind her, the Cornelia is back at her old station off the Duluth piers, waiting to come in to load grain. She arrived with a cargo of cement she discharged at the CRH US dock  (formerly Holcim, and before that St. Lawrence Cement).

Olza, the 5th of 8 sister ships to visit Duluth from Poland

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The Polish operated Olza arrived Duluth yesterday (Thursday afternoon, October 15, 2016) to load wheat at Riverland Ag (formerly Cargill) in Duluth. Built in China  in 2012 by the Polish Steamship Company, she made her first of 4 visits to the Twin Ports on May 11, 2014 when she loaded grain at CHS in Superior. She was back in November the same year to load grain at the Peavey elevator in Superior. Last year, she loaded grain at CHS in November. She is one of eight sister ships built for the Company since 2011. Her 7 sisters are Regalica, Narew, Raba, Prosna, Skawa, San and Ina, 4 of which have visited Duluth Superior (check links just above). They are all 491 feet long.

HHL Amazon arrived Duluth to load grain.

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The HHL Amazon was built as the Beluga Fairy in 2009. She came here with that name on September 12, 2010 to load grain. She was sold, renamed to HHL Amazon, repainted and arrived here on June 21, 2012 with wind turbine nacelles she loaded in Spain that were later sent to Montana by truck. She came under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge today (above, August 27, 2016) to load grain.

Taagborg arrives Duluth – first trip to Twin Ports

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The Dutch flagged Taagborg arrived Duluth around 10:30 Sunday morning on August 14, 2016. Built in 2013, this is her first trip here. After coming under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge, she turned up the Duluth harbor (above) on her way over to HS2 in Superior to load grain.
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MarBacan comes into Duluth harbor

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The MarBacan arrived Duluth after a short time at the anchorage on Sunday evening, August 7, 2016. She will begin loading grain at the Riverland Ag dock on Monday morning. She was in Gibraltar on April 17 of this year. From there, she sailed to Houston, Texas, then to Lebanon and Turkey before turning back to sail to the Great Lakes and eventually, today, to Duluth.
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She is owned by MarConsult Schiffahrt  in Hamburg,  Germany. Beside this ship, they own 3 other bulk carriers: MarCarolina, MarColorado and MarBioko, along with 7 container vessels and 11 Multi-purpose vessels. Below, she gets an assist from the tug  Arkansas after going under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge.
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Brand new Federal Churchill arrives Duluth

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The brand new Federal Churchill arrived Duluth on Wednesday afternoon, July 18, 2016. She will load wheat at Riverland Ag in Duluth and then leave for Algeria to discharge the cargo. She got an assist from the tug Arkansas as she came under the Lift Bridge.
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Stade makes first visit to Duluth

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After waiting at anchor off the Duluth piers for the Algoma Harvester to complete loading grain at Riverland Ag in Duluth, the Stade came in after the Harvester departed early yesterday evening (Thursday, July 14, 2016). The Stade is owned by a German Company and named after the town of Stade in Germany.

Sjard wind turbine discharge in Duluth Minnesota

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The Sjard blew into town last night with wind turbine parts she is discharging at the Port Terminal. She is one of many BBC ships that have been coming to Duluth for many years, although she does not carry the letters BBC in her name as did her sister ship the BBC Haren, in town in late May.
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2 First-time visitors to Duluth

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The Canadian flagged Leonard M. (above) arrived last night at 7:40 pushing the barge Huron Spirit filled with steel coils from Essar Steel Algoma Inc. located at Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada. At 7:13 this morning (June 16, 2016), the Marselisborg arrived with wind turbine parts she is discharging at the Port Terminal.
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Vlieborg, Anderson pass in the Duluth harbor

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The Vlieborg (above) arrived this morning (May 31, 2016) at 6:25 as the Arthur M. Anderson was departing, passing each other in the Duluth harbor. This is the second visit of this version of the Vlieborg; she was also here in November, 2012 (the year she was built) to load beet pulp pellets.  Notice the ladder hanging down from the deck of the Vlieborg and also her direction, as if she, like the Anderson, is departing. The Vlieborg is in the harbor for inspection by local grain officials and other port personnel. When that is complete, she may go out to the anchorage, stay where she is or go over to CHS to load grain. Today’s weather, cold, with high winds and rain, may keep her there; going out to the anchorage in this wind may not be the Captain’s first choice, and grain is not loaded when it is raining. This was the 6th visit to the Twin Ports for the Anderson this season. She loaded iron ore pellets at the CN.

Both the Kurt Paul and the Trudy here for second time to discharge general cargo

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The Kurt Paul, above, arrived on Saturday and went to anchor off the Duluth piers. This morning (May 29, 2016) at 6:14, she came into port and is now discharging wind turbine blades at the Port Terminal.  She was here once before, in May, 2011, also discharging wind turbine blades. She is expected to complete that discharge and depart the port this evening. Below, the Trudy arrived here on May 24 and has been discharging clay at the Port Terminal. She also was here once before; in November, 2015 when she also discharged clay. That job will take a holiday on Monday (Memorial Day) and resume on Tuesday, hoping to complete the discharge late next week.
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BBC Haren, the 57th BBC ship to come to Duluth

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The BBC Haren came under the Lift Bridge on Friday evening (May 20, 2016) at 8:15. She is now waiting to load grain at the CHS2 terminal.This is the most recent of 54 visits that ships operated by BBC Chartering & Logistics of Leer, Germany have made to the Port of Duluth Superior (I might add, the largest port by tonnage of all the ports on the Great Lakes). They are the BBC Amazon, BBC Arizona, BBC Atlantic, BBC Celina, BBC Chile, BBC Elbe, BBC Ems, BBC England, BBC Europe, BBC Finland, BBC Florida, BBC France, BBC Fuji, BBC Germany, BBC Greenland, BBC Haren, BBC Italy, BBC Jade, BBC Kimberley, BBC Louisiana, BBC Maine, BBC Mississippi, BBC Mont Blanc, BBC Ontario, BBC Oregon, BBC Orinoco, BBC Plata, BBC Rhine, BBC Rosario, BBC Scandinavia, BBC Shanghai, BBC Sweden, BBC Texas, BBC Venezuela, BBC Volga and BBC Zarate.

There are many more, including BBC Pluto, BBC Neptune, BBC Moonstone and a lot named for states of the United States, including BBC Carolina, Virginia, Vermont, Utah, Tennessee, Oregon, Ohio, Michigan, Maryland, Maine, Louisiana, Georgia, Florida, Delaware, Colorado, California, Arizona, Alabama, Wisconsin, Nevada, Kansas. You may notice some of these states do not have deep water ports, or even shallow water ports for that matter. There are many more, named for mountains,  rivers, countries, cities and some I am not sure about. Notice, there is not one called BBC Duluth or even BBC Minnesota, even though their ships have been here 54 times since the first BBC ship arrived on April 17, 2005. You may remember that was the BBC Ontario.

But still, I must emphasize that we welcome all ships to our port including the BBC Haren. But please, when you get back to the home office, please put a good word in for us, that is, DULUTH MINNESOTA.

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Prosna, a river, a race and a ship

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Here is the 2015 edition of the annual race through the Prosna River in Poland. The race attracts a lot of runners and the streets by and over the river are filled with spectators. They even named a ship after the river and she arrived Duluth this morning (May 11, 2016) and is now loading grain at the CHS terminal located on the St. Louis River in Superior.
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Check the ship page for the Prosna.

Federal Biscay departs with wheat for England

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After launch in Japan on October 22, 2015, the Federal Biscay arrived Duluth on April 26, 2016 to load wheat. Above and below, she departed today (April 29, 2016) for England with wheat.
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Federal Biscay brings new ballast water treatment system to Duluth

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On October 22, 2015, Fednav Limited (of Montreal), took delivery from Oshima Shipbuilding (in Japan) of the brand new Federal Biscay. She arrived in Duluth this morning (April 26, 2016) to load wheat at CHS 2 that she will take to England and probably also to Ghent, Belgium. She is the first ship in the Great Lakes to be equipped with a new ballast water treatment system called  BallastAce. It will operate in both fresh and salt water environments using a sophisticated filter and sodium hypochlorite (bleach) injection mechanism in the ship’s ballast system. This will prevent the further intrusion of invasive species into the Great Lakes system.
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At the top, the local tug Kentucky assisted the Federal Biscay from the stern and the tug Arkansas worked the bow.  In the picture just above,  you can see the stern of the Arkansas moving behind the American Century that, arriving at 6:31 this morning, is getting fuel at the Calumet Fuel dock at the Port Terminal.

Cold, windy and rainy but still working

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After arriving Duluth on Sunday to load 66,000 tons of coal for the Detroit Edison power plant at St. Clair, Michigan, the Paul R. Tregurtha is seen above making her turn into the Duluth harbor, on her way out, officially going under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge at 11:45 this morning, April 25, 2016. She is passing by the Vancouverborg and Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. docked at the Port Terminal. The Vancouverborg came into port at 1:22 this morning and is waiting to load grain at CHS in Superior. The McCarthy is behind her fueling at the Calumet Fuel Dock. She will probably depart there for the BN terminal to load iron ore pellets.

Federal Caribou, first of two new ships in Duluth

The Federal Caribou was launched earlier this year at Oshima Shipbuilding  in Japan where she was built. She left there to pick up steel products in South Korea and then started into the Pacific Ocean, through the Panama Canal and then north through the Atlantic Ocean along the US Coast to the St. Lawrence Seaway system, going between Newfoundland and Nova Scotia and into the St. Lawrence River. She arrived in Sorel, Quebec to discharge some of her cargo, and then went to the port of Picton, Ontario to drop off more of her steel products.
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Her last discharge port was Windsor, Canada, across the river from Detroit. After that, she departed Windsor for Duluth, arriving here on April 23, 2016. She dropped anchor off the Duluth piers (above), ending her maiden voyage. She will probably come into port on Monday to take the place of the Wigeon at CHS in Superior. There, she will load wheat and then depart for Algeria to deliver the cargo.

Heavy lift Fairlift returns to Duluth

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The heavy lift ship, Jumbo Shipping’s Fairlift, arrived under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge (above) on Thursday evening April 14, 2016. She brought with her 8 large pieces of gas/oil production equipment built in Italy. You can see 2 of the pieces on her weather deck in the picture above and below. She also brought large pieces of equipment here in 2007 and 2000. check
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She docked at the Port Terminal Thursday evening (above) and preparation began to move the large pieces from the ship to railcars sitting beside the ship.
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On Friday afternoon, two on-board cranes slowly lifted the first piece off the deck and out over the waiting railcars.
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Each piece will be carried by 2 rail cars lashed together to handle too large and extra long cargo.
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Albanyborg is first salt water ship of the season

2016-0403-6077The Albanyborg arrived last night (Sunday, April 3, 2016) at 7:46 (at right). This is her first visit to the Twin Ports and she was the first salt water ship of the season. She also was the first foreign-flag vessel to enter the Seaway after it opened on March 23. She is listed as a Multipurpose Dry Cargo Carrier, meaning she was built to carry a wide variety of cargo. She started her journey in Germany where she loaded wind turbine components that she discharged in Port Colborne, Ontario before arriving here last night. She will be loading grain at CHS in Superior but is currently at the Port Terminal (below) reconfiguring her cargo holds. Officially, she has 2 cargo holds but they can both be sub divided, both horizontally and vertically. She arrived set up with several levels to hold the wind turbine pieces. They are taking them down since they will be loading a bulk cargo and will be using the full height of each cargo hold.
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Still working at the other end …

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… of the St. Lawrence Seaway system. René Beauchamp took this photo of the Bluebill and Federal Leda on February 15, 2016 while they were anchored off Sorel-Tracy, about 50 miles from Montreal, on the St Lawrence River. Bluebill (left) has waited to go up the river to load grain at Elevator 4 in Montreal since January 23. Federal Leda (right) has a cargo of sugar and will eventually go to section 46  to unload. Her fleetmate Federal Sutton is there now. The Seaway is closed now, but will reopen on March 23. Thank you René for sharing the pictures and information with us at this end.

Moezelborg in Duluth Superior twice

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I added more information and pictures on the Moezelborg  page

Matcho, a canine crew member

The Chios Charity was recently scrapped but she was here 7 times after 1996. I got to know Matcho, her canine crew member on those last two trips.  Click below for a short video about my two visits with the Chios Charity wonder dog.

Finally

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These two pictures of the Cornelia were taken by René Beauchamp this morning, Saturday, December 26, 2015 at Côte Ste.Catherine, just below Montreal, in the St. Lawrence Seaway. René reports she is currently (Saturday afternoon) docked at Montreal and is presumably ready to depart North American and move into the Atlantic Ocean, finally (for details about her adventures in Duluth, click here).
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Algoma Harvester makes 2nd trip to Twin Ports

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Denny Dushane was kind enough to send me some pictures he took of the Algoma Harvester, a new build that is expected to arrive here on Sunday, December 20, 2015 to load iron ore pellets at the Burlington Northern Santa Fe ore dock in Superior. He also provided the commentary below.
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The photos were taken of the Algoma Harvester in St. Clair, MI. on September 14, 2015 as she was upbound “light and in ballast.” They were coming from Trois Rivieres, Quebec after unloading a cargo of wheat from Thunder Bay, Ontario and were now returning and heading back up to Thunder Bay, Ontario to load another cargo of wheat this time for Baie Comeau, Quebec.

dushane09142015stclairiverIMG_6798 The Algoma Harvester is the 2nd Equinox class vessel built at the Nantong Mingde Heavy Industries shipyard in Nantong City, China. She follows the Algoma Equinox the 1st in the series delivered in late 2013 and the CWB Marquis delivered in late 2014.Algoma Harvester was christened on December 25, 2013 and departed the shipyard on May 18, 2014. After crossing the Pacific Ocean, the ship arrived at the Pacific Entrance of the Panama Canal on June 27 to anchor awaiting clearance. They cleared the anchorage on June 28 and transited the Panama Canal then. The Algoma Harvester after clearing the Panama Canal, arrived in Port Cartier, Quebec on July 11, 2014 to load its first official cargo which was iron ore pellets for Hamilton, Ontario.

dushane09142015stclairiverIMG_6797Later on, the Algoma Harvester arrived in Hamilton on July 15 where it was then officially christened in a Christening Ceremony at Pier 21 on July 17. After the Christening Ceremony, the ship immediately moved over to Pier 26 in Hamilton to unload its first cargo of iron ore pellets at the Arcelor Mittal/Dofasco Steel Dock.Its usual cargoes are wheat from Thunder Bay, Ontario to the St. Lawrence River ports and then backhauling iron ore pellets from either Port Cartier or Sept Isles, Quebec to Hamilton and then back up to Thunder Bay to load for the St. Lawrence.

Cornelia leaves Duluth, finally; winter arrives, finally

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Listen:
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After 6 weeks at anchor, the Cornelia came in this afternoon

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… at 3:55 this afternoon (December 16, 2015). With the assistance of the Great Lakes tug Kentucky on her stern and the Arkansas at the bow, the Cornelia moved over to get some fuel. She will likely remain in port tonight and depart sometime tomorrow.
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Click here for other posts on Duluth Shipping News regarding the trials and tribulations of the Cornelia.

Brand new ship with the Port’s last cargo

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2015-1214-5233Other than the fact that it was too dark and I only caught the last half of the ship, I was happy to get this shot of the Federal Bering coming under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge last night (December 14, 2015) at 11 pm after a day or so at anchor in the Apostle Islands waiting for high winds to diminish. She then went over to CHS 2 in Superior to load the Port’s last cargo of grain on a salt water ship, a split load of wheat and canola that she will take to Mexico, leaving later this week. I said load and not left with the last cargo of grain since, as I write this, the Cornelia is still at anchor with her cargo of grain that she loaded at CHS 1 about  40 days ago. Winter may never get here but the Soo Locks will close on January 15, but of more importance to the Cornelia, the Welland Canal will close on December 26th and the rest of the Seaway by December 30th. Still don’t know what will become of her and her cargo, but I suppose she could become the last cargo on a salt water ship to depart, unless of course that award requires the cargo and ship to depart under the Lift Bridge and not from the anchorage. Laughing out loud

A page from the past: April 12, 2004

Lithuanian national anthem celebrates 1st ship of the year

A Lithuanian couple from Wisconsin came up to Duluth on April 12, 2004 to visit the first saltie of the year, the Lithuanian flagged Kapitonas Andzejauskas. Mrs. Tribys told us her husband would sing the Lithuanian national anthem for us and he did! Click here for more on the song and here for more information on the ship.

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Coast Guard information on the Cornelia

More pictures of the Cornelia
Date: Dec 3, 2015: Ninth Coast Guard District provides the following information regarding the Cornelia
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Cornelia Motor vessel Cornelia investigation continues

CLEVELAND — The Coast Guard continues investigating an ocean-going freighter, currently at anchor in Duluth, Minnesota, for alleged violations of U.S. law.

The Coast Guard is investigating the crew, equipment and records of the Liberian-flagged motor vessel Cornelia for allegations involving violations related to the discharge of oily water.

Based upon current information in the investigation, it does not appear that the discharge occurred within the port of Duluth – Superior.

Although the Cornelia and crew are typically equipped to remain at sea for several months, Coast Guard personnel continue to check in with the master of the Cornelia regularly, who confirms the crew has adequate food, water and other necessities.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Minnesota accepted the case for criminal investigation November 9. The Coast Guard and the vessel’s owner and operator are negotiating a security agreement that would permit the vessel to depart the port while simultaneously protecting the integrity of the investigation and the interests of the vessel’s crew members.

The Coast Guard and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Minnesota take any allegations involving environmental pollution very seriously. At the same time, both agencies recognize the importance of the flow of commerce through the port of Duluth – Superior and are making every effort to complete our investigation as soon as possible.

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Date: Dec 3, 2015

Ninth Coast Guard District

Nothing new now, but I have a scoop from long ago

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In the old days, I was sometimes a good source for information about the port. Sometimes I even knew stuff I wasn’t supposed to talk about. Other times, I could and that was fun. Nowadays, I read the paper to find out about the exciting stuff; well not yet so exiting. The Duluth News Tribune had a picture of the Cornelia at anchor off the Duluth piers on their front page this morning (November 7, 2015). The above is the picture I took this morning. There was big news but the News Tribune didn’t know what the news was. I was happy to find out from them that there was news. I still don’t know why she is out there either. I refer you to the article for the list of people who will not tell them (us) what is going on. The US Attorney says the ship is being held there (by the Coast Guard, I assume) as a part of a federal probe. Hmmm.

Many years ago, when I was better connected (before 9-11), I found out a ship was coming to Duluth under armed guard. I got a ride out to the ship at anchor and was lucky enough to come in with her later in the day. She had many other names before she was decommissioned in 2011.

Radnik: 1984-1996
Grant Carrier: 1996-2001
Chios Sailor: 2001-2007
Elpida: 2007-2009
Chios Voyager: 2009-2011
Kai Shun: 2011 until decommissioned

Read below to find out about that adventure.

On July 5 the Grant Carrier and her crew of 27 left Odessa, a Ukrainian city on the Black Sea, on their way to Duluth. At the time, no ship with Yugoslavian officers was allowed in U.S. waters unless accompanied by armed guards, supplied by the Coast Guard and paid for by the shipowner. That was because our (NATO) planes were bombing their cities at the time.
So the Grant Carrier came to Duluth on August 17, 1999 with a contingent of five armed (but friendly) Coast Guard sailors. The officers and crew were indeed from Yugoslavia, many from Kotor, a city on the coast of the Adriatic Sea in Montenegro.
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The ship arrived and dropped anchor and waited for a party of local port officials to come out. I went out with them and took a gamble and asked the captain if I could stay aboard until the ship came in later that afternoon. (The gamble being the possibility that plans would change and the ship would stay at anchor, perhaps for days. There is no regularly scheduled transportation between the Duluth shore and a ship at anchor.
Above, Ship Captain Tomislav Radovic is at his desk talking with his guards; below, he is reading the latest issue of the Duluth Shipping News.
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Above, and 2 below, Grant Carrier crew members.
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The guards and the guarded lined up in a row. Below, later that afternoon, the ship, the guards and me come into Duluth
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We came in under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge late that afternoon, as promised. Both the Coast Guard and Captain Radovic and crew were out waving to the crowd, none of whom had any idea the guys in blue outfits were wearing pistols and guarding the ship.
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As soon as we docked, the Coast Guard left the ship for more private quarters in a local hotel, glad to be back on American soil. The officers and crew were just as interested in getting off the ship to see the sights in Duluth. The next evening, I was walking down Lake Avenue in Canal Park with Captain Radovic and First Mate Pajovic when we passed Grandma’s Sport’s Garden. Both men started to wave at someone playing pool inside. As we walked on, I asked whom they could possibly know in Duluth. Answer: their friendly Coast Guard ‘protectors’ were taking a break playing a few games of pool. I of course set aside the thought that they might be following us, although the captain did tell me that he had also run into them the night before.

On the evening the ship left Duluth, I went aboard with an armful of Port Authority coffee cups and passed them out to the crew. Some crewmembers left our deck party immediately but returned within minutes with gifts for me. They started with cigarettes and lighters, even though I insisted I didn’t smoke. I quickly realized that it was the thought that counts in these matters.

Others came back with beautiful maps of the area around Kotor. Kotor is a medieval city, and the pictures clearly showed the remains of the wall built centuries ago to protect the city from invaders. As we sat on the deck in Duluth, five of them pointed to houses in the pictures where they live, or once lived. They were so insistent on making sure I knew that they were nice, peace-loving people, as were the people of Montenegro, that I almost could not get off the ship. I was surely convinced, as I walked down the gangway to drive back to the ship canal.

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Above and below, my scans of the 2 posters the crew gave me.
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Old salts tell me the Grant Carrier was the first ship ever to come into Duluth under armed guard, and I had the scoop. I went up and down the piers passing out the Duluth Shipping News and telling people that the ship with the armed guards was coming soon. The crew was hyped, and I had suggested to the captain that he do some serious work with the ship’s whistle when they came under the bridge.

I was still not prepared for what happened. As the ship came around the buoy and approached the bridge, the entire crew was out on the deck, and not just standing there. They were all jumping up and down and waving. The captain hit the horn just before the ship went under the bridge, and he didn’t take his hand off until the ship was leaving the canal.

Those of us on the ground returned the jumping and the noise to the ship; it was quite a moment. I felt we had all made a small contribution to a better world given that our two countries were at war.

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And, I almost forgot, the Grant Carrier was docked the Cargill Elevator to load grain.

Cornelia waiting

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The Cornelia has been at anchor off the Duluth piers for several days, waiting to come in to load grain at CHS. This is her second trip here this year; she was here in May to load grain at Riverland Ag, formerly Cargill. On previous trips in December, 2012 and November, 2013, she discharged clay at the Port Terminal before loading grain.

Two salties made their first visit to Twin Ports today

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The Brant arrived at 10:55 this morning (October 19, 2015) to load grain. An hour later, the BBC Kimberley came in to load wind turbine parts.
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In for grain, out with coal

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The Federal Asahi came in from the anchorage on Tuesday afternoon, September 29, 2015 to load grain at CHS 2 in Superior. This is her 7th visit to Duluth Superior since she was built in 2000 and her second trip this season; she was also here in May. Once in the harbor, she passed the Indiana Harbor, on her way out with 68,000 tons of  coal loaded at Midwest Energy Resources for the Detroit Edison power plant in St. Clair, Michigan.
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Duluth comings and goings

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The Buffalo arrived Duluth at 11:23 on Tuesday evening, September 8, 2015. Above, she departed under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge the next morning at 11:00. Below, she is turning in the harbor toward the bridge, on her way to Silver Bay to load iron ore pellets. She will take some of the pellets to the Cleveland Bulk Terminal located at the mouth of the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland. They will then move up the river to the Mittal steel plant to discharge the remainder.
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Despite the Maltese flag, the Pilica (above and below) is owned by the Polish Steamship Company. She was built in Poland in 1999 and usually carries a Polish crew. She is loading grain at Riverland Ag (formerly Cargill) on this her 13th visit to the Twin Ports (arriving on September 7th). Time flies when you are getting old; I remember boarding the ship on May 23rd, 2000 when she had just been built and was making her first trip to the St. Lawrence Seaway. Fifteen years ago, it was a thrill to see such a brand new ship. Today, it is fun to welcome her as a seasoned veteran of the Duluth Superior grain trade.
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Below, the American Century arrived Duluth on Tuesday evening, September 8, 2015 to load coal at Midwest Energy Resources in Superior. Just above, she departed the next morning  with 68,000 tons of low sulfur coal she will deliver to the St. Clair electrical generation plant of Detroit Edison.
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The Vikingbank and Sea Bear come in to port together

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The Vikingbank had been waiting at anchor for several days and came into port on Labor Day, September 7, 2015. This is her 6th trip to the Twin Ports since she was built in 2012. She was just here on June 14th this summer when she loaded beet pulp pellets; she will load the same cargo on this trip, taking it to Ireland where it will be used as animal feed.
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In all ports in the world, a visiting ship is required to have a local pilot on board who knows the harbor and its many variations. The Sea Bear, the local pilot boat,  took a pilot out to the Vikingbank so she could come in to port. Here they both are returning to port.

More wind turbine blades for Minnesota Power

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HHL Tyne arrived under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge in the early evening of August 26, 2015 with her deck piled high with wind turbine blades.
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More wind turbines in Duluth

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The HHL Elbe arrived Wednesday afternoon, August 6, 2015 with wind turbine parts to discharge at the Port Terminal. Built in 2008, this is her first visit to the Twin Ports. When she completes discharging the wind turbine pieces, she will go over to CHS in Superior to load grain as her departing cargo.
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HHL Amur, under Bridge, into slip

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The HHL Amur arrived under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge on Friday afternoon, July 17, 2015 at 1:45 with wind turbine blades on her deck. She is now discharging them at the Port Terminal. (Two images above courtesy of Dave Campbell; click pics for larger versions)
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HHL Volga brings more wind turbine blades to Duluth

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After half a day at the outside anchorage, the HHL Volga came in Sunday afternoon, June 28, 2015, with a cargo of wind turbine blades she will begin discharging on Monday morning. She is the former Beluga Family when she was operated by Beluga Shipping in Bremen, Germany. After Beluga went bankrupt, the ship was purchased by Hansa Heavy Lift, also in Bremen. Although many Beluga ships have been to Duluth before, this will be the first visit for this ship. This is, I think, the 3rd shipment of wind turbine pieces to come to Duluth this season. There are more coming.

Friday night, let’s have a party

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The salt water vessel Eider (the green one) came into port on June 16th to discharge a lot of pipe at the Port Terminal. Eleven days later (June 26, 2015), they are still here. Maybe they decided to test out Duluth night life and invite a few new friends over. The Great Republic (in the middle) and the James R. Barker (in back) arrived on time, but it appears the Barker had to leave early; must be another party in Superior.

Duluth/Superior, an International port

Two ships: Whistler and Eider, 5 countries: US, Greece, Venezuela, Hong Kong (China), Algeria and 3 states: Wisconsin, Texas and Minnesota, at least
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In the top picture, the Whistler is leaving Duluth on Thursday evening, June 18, 2015, after loading durum wheat at the CHS terminal in Superior. She arrived on June 13 and dropped her anchor while she waited for the Drawsko to finish loading spring wheat. On Monday evening (June 15, 2015), the Whistler came in as the Drawsko was departing for Venezuela and took her place at CHS. The Whistler began her trip to the Twin Ports after discharging cargo in Houston in early April. She loaded durum wheat here that she is now taking to Algeria. Because of the ice, ocean going ships cannot come to Duluth or enter the St. Lawrence Seaway from mid-December to mid-March. During our winter, many of those ships load the same grain they load here in ports in the Southern United States, brought down the Mississippi River by barge from Midwestern farms. The Whistler is such a ship.
whistlerduckaudabon The Whistler is owned by Parakou Shipping in Hong Kong. She is now under charter to Canadian Forest Navigation (Canfornav for short). They send many ships to Duluth Superior to load grain. They name the ships they use after ducks. In her case, it is the Black-bellied Whistling-Duck that also can be found in Texas. As she was departing, she passed another Parakou ship, the Eider, while she was at the Port Terminal discharging 8,000 pieces of pipe she loaded in Greece. (Whistler picture from www.audubon.org)
2015-0618-1885I was about a mile away when I took this picture and it was only after preparing this web page post that I noticed 2 boats in the background, docked in Superior. Click on the image to enlarge it (you can do the same with the other three pictures). At the left, the Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. is at the Lakehead dock. To the right, you can see the stern and the bow of the American Victory; she is the former Middletown. Now owned by American Steamship, she was in long term layup at Fraser Shipyard but was moved while Fraser is doing some new construction work. She has the stack colors of American Steamship but retains her Columbia colors for everything else.
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Clipper Makiri arrives Duluth with blades

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The Clipper Makiri arrived Sunday night at 11:41 with wind turbine blades she loaded in China and some machinery she picked up in Thailand. This is her first trip to the Twin Ports. She was built in 1999 as the Makiri Green. She then sailed as the Sloman Server until 2012 when she became the Mikiri Green again. Her name was recently changed to Clipper Makiri. She was a member of the Dutch shipping company Green Fleet and still sailing with her green colors. Many Green Fleet ships have visited Duluth in the past, although this is the first trip here for the Clipper Makiri.

Dool today, Fraserborg yesterday

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The Tim S. Dool came in this afternoon (May 20, 2015) with cement to discharge at the Holcim dock in Duluth. Yesterday, the Dutch flagged Fraserborg arrived (below) to load grain. The Fraserborg is making her third trip here; she was here twice in 2011. The Dool was here many times as the Algoville; she was renamed to the Tim S. Dool in 2008 after Dool retired from his position as President and CEO of Algoma Central Corp. Since then she has made 11 trips to the Twin Ports.
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Kom took Twin Ports wheat to Tunisia

I have published the Duluth Shipping News for 20 years and until today, have never had pictures taken of cargo loaded in Duluth being discharged in a land far far away . Today, that all changes, courtesy of Captain Mariyan Yotov, who brought the Bulgarian built, owned, operated and crewed salt water vessel Kom to town on April 13, 2015.  They loaded  wheat at CHS 1 in Superior. About a month later, they were in Sfax, Tunisia discharging the wheat. Captain Yotov sent us the pictures below showing their work.
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Two on-shore cranes are scooping the wheat from the cargo holds of the Kom and depositing each load into a giant funnel which in turn pours the wheat into trucks moved in just below the funnels.  We can see two trucks being loaded simultaneously.
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Click on the map from Google Earth below to see a larger version. Tunisia is located on the northern tip of Africa; I think they also discharged some cargo in Italy. They started their trip to Duluth from Spain, at left on the map.
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Friending the Captain of the Kom

Received this email this morning (May 12, 2015): “Kenneth, Мариян Йотов has confirmed that you’re friends on Facebook.” That’s Captain Mariyan Yotov, the Captain of the Kom, the first salt water vessel to arrive in Duluth Superior this season. He linked to a long post about the visit on  www.maritime.bg, below left, a screen print of the page, and beside it, Google’s translation of the page. Many Twin Ports news sources are mentioned. (Captain Yotov’s Facebook page)
 

the translation:
On April 15, 2015, the motor ship "Kom" of Navigation Maritime Bulgare arrived at the US port of The Twin Ports Duluth, Minnesota and Superior, Wisconsin. This is the largest freshwater port in the world. Located in the western part of the komcaptainfacebookpagemay122015North American Great Lakes (North America’s Great Lakes) and accept ships arriving from the Atlantic Ocean and pass through the sea route "St. Lawrence "and Great Lakes (The Great Lakes and the Saint Lawrence Seaway). It is united port in two US cities that belong to the Territorial two different states: Minnesota Duluth has to and Superiar – to Wisconsin. In The Twin Ports cargo is 19th among all US ports.
This news would hardly deserved so much attention if it was not this detail, the crew of "Kom" Captain Marian Yotov was greeted by local and regional port authorities with the traditional ceremony "Welcome the first" salty "(coming from the ocean) ship! "at the end of the heavy winter in this region. Welcomes the first captain of the Bulgarian ship Dave McMillan (Dave McMillan) – Chairman of the Board of The St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation. On the bridge of "Kom" Captain Yotov welcomes its guests with painted Easter eggs and invite them to participate in traditional Bulgarian "fight" with them.
(Photo below, right; the Captain battles Adele Yorde of the Duluth Seaway Port Authority) The event is also reflected by the three television channels in the region and is broadcast live by two other media: The Duluth Shipping News and The Duluth News Tribune. A reporter of NNCNOW.com captain Yotov said: "I love Duluth and its inhabitants. They welcome us very friendly and open arms. I am really glad to be here. " Local media also indicate that over half of the transition through the sea route "St. Lawrence "and Great Lakes ‘Kom’ was sailing in heavy ice situation and had to seek the assistance of an icebreaker. The arrival of the ship in the US Maritime port The Twin2015-0415-952 Ports without any damage to it is another proof of the professionalism of the Bulgarian crew.
The publication states that "Qom" has arrived in The Twin Ports Duluth after 25 days in Spain transition from not particularly favorable weather in the North Atlantic. It accepts the US port 12,100 tons high quality wheat in his barns to deliver client Italian port. The Duluth Shipping News notes that this is the fifth visit of the "Kom" here and that his first visit took place on May 26, 1998 – a year after it was built in Varna Shipyard. The newspaper published an aerial photograph of the city – the city where he built ".COM" and a picture of the Balkan us Kom Peak, whose name it bears ship.
When maneuvering the Bulgarian ship The Twin Ports Duluth is assisted by tugs of The Great Lakes Towing Company – a company with over 115 years of history, which is in Navigation Maritime business partnership in 1987. The information and photos are sent to the BMF by Stefanos Skortelis – from ship agency company Navitrans Shipping Agencies Inc., Canada, as the Communication states that the photographs of the ceremony and the visit of the "Kom" made by Paul Scinocca & Diane Hilden (DKH).

Wind turbine blades again

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After several days at anchor, the salt water ship Johanna C came into port on Sunday afternoon, May 3, 2015. After going under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge, the Heritage Marine tug Helen H. moved up to help her make her dock at the Port Terminal. On Monday, workers at Lake Superior Warehousing Company, at the Port Terminal, will begin discharging the wind turbine blades.
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Wind turbine blades at anchor off Duluth piers

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On April 18th, the Johanna C (above) was off just off the coast of Newfoundland and due in Montreal on the 19th on her way to Duluth. She arrived Montreal on the 21st. By the 26th, she was in the Welland Canal, at Detroit on the 27th and at the Soo Locks on the 28th. She arrived off the Duluth piers last night (April 29th) as the sun was setting and dropped her anchor.She has wind turbine blades on her deck, the first to come to Duluth in several years. She is in the anchorage waiting for the Lady Doris (below) to complete her discharge of clay at the port terminal.
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Bringing clay for local paper mills from Brazil

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The Lady Doris came into port on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 at 10:30 am with a cargo of Kaolin clay she loaded in Brazil.
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A local Great Lakes Towing tug met her after she came under the Lift Bridge and assisted while the ship moved up to the Port Terminal. To discharge the cargo, the ship needed to be tied up to the dock with bow pointing forward (toward downtown Duluth), so the tug helped her slowly turn around before moving to the dock to tie up .
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You can see the red crane that will be used to discharge the clay, which will take about 5 days working 24 hours a day. After discharge, the clay will be mixed with water, creating a slurry that will then go to local paper companies. She brought a similar cargo on her first trip to the Twin Ports on August 7th last year.
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Meanwhile, the Johanna C  is on her way to Duluth and should arrive on Wednesday with her main deck stacked high with wind turbine blades to be discharged at the Port Terminal after the Lady Doris is finished, in about 5 days. In the meantime, the Johanna C  will be at the outside anchorage while she waits, a scene that I am sure will attract local photographers.

The green Redhead comes in to load durum wheat

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The Redhead duck has a reddish head and spends the winter in Texas; the rest of the year in the Western United States and Canada. The Redhead ship is green and came into port on Monday afternoon, April 27th, 2015. She is a salt water ship sailing under a charter to Canadian Forest Navigation (Canfornav for short). The ships they work with are named after ducks. She is spending the night in the inner harbor, waiting to load durum wheat for Italy at CHS 1 after the Federal Mayumi finishes there.
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Just across the St. Louis River from Duluth

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The Federal Mayumi came into port Saturday evening, April 24th, 2015 and is now at CHS (above) in Superior loading wheat for Italy. This is her first trip to the Twin Ports. The American Integrity was loading coal at Midwest Energy Resources, just up the river from CHS. She departed late this morning with 66,000 tons of coal for the Detroit Edison power plant in St. Clair, Michigan.

Visiting the Kom

2015-0415-1039hollyThe Kom arrived on April 13, 2015, the first salt water ship of the season. It was her 5th trip to the Twin Ports; she first visited us on May 26, 1998, just a year after she was built in Varna, Bulgaria. She is owned by Navigation Maritime Bulgare in Varna. Captain Mariyan Yotov lives in Varna and all of the crew live in Bulgaria, some in Varna also.
(Click on any image to see a larger version)
My associate, Holly Jorgenson, joined me. She 2015-0415-959took this picture as we started our visit going carefully up the gangway. After that, it was only 5 more levels until we reached the pilot house. While we were up in the pilot house, the stevedores at CHS 1 were on the deck loading wheat into the cargo holds.There are two important people on any ship; the captain and the cook. Here Holly chats with the cook; it almost looks like she is praying for food.
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Holly found Captain Yotov’s Facebook page so you too can share some of his travels around the world. Everybody, and everything has a face book page. I was looking around the web for Kom Peak and found their Facebook page. They just sent me an email titled, Kom Peak confirmed your Facebook friend request. Now I am friends with a mountain!Several years ago, I created a web page for the Kom, and I included a Google Earth map to make sure we all knew where Bulgaria was. Captain Yotov likes maps too so he took us down a floor to give us a short tour around his world. First, he showed us home: Varna, his port city on the Black Sea.
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Then to Spain, and the port of LaCoruña, at the northwest tip of Spain, where they began their trip to Duluth.
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2015-0415-999When they depart the Twin Ports, they will be taking their cargo of wheat to a port in Italy where it will be used to make pasta. Then all officers and crew will be taking the short flight home to Varna; to be replaced by another all Bulgarian crew. I emphasize this since we don’t see this much anymore; Greek owned, operated and crewed ships (with a great Greek cook I might add) were here often and Polish ships the same. For a while the Dutch ships with all Dutch crews were here from the Netherlands. In fact, the captains on some of the Dutch ships have also been part owners of the ship they were on. That was nice; it was almost like visiting the country. Today, costs are cut and many companies have left the shipping business; crews are now often found from other countries with lower pay scales. So we welcome the Kom, a small part of Bulgaria, to Duluth Superior, still holding their country’s maritime heritage and helping us with ours.
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The Captain is often asked, as he was here, where the name Kom came from. It is named for Kom Peak in the Balkan Mountains in western Bulgaria, not far from the Serbian border. Above we see the view from the top of Kom Peak. The peak is 6,614 feet high and is a popular site for hikers. The country has many interesting neighbors; Romania to the north; Serbia and Macedonia to the west; Greece to the south and Turkey to the southeast. And of course, a long coastal connection to the beautiful Black Sea. Above, the view from the top of Kom’s Peak. Below, the city of Varna.
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2015-0415-1010On the way to sunny, almost warm Duluth, the Kom was caught up in the big ice jam at Whitefish Point in the eastern part of Lake Superior, just this side of the Soo Locks. Captain Yotov took us out to show us the bow of his ship which made countless surges into the ice; the white lines are the marks the ice left on her bow to show us they were there.
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Below, the Kom comes in for more grain on November 27, 2014.
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Kom comes to Duluth

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The Kom came under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge early this afternoon (April 13, 2015). She is the first salt water ship to arrive for the season, beginning her voyage in LaCoruña, Spain. She will load 12,100 tons of durum wheat for Italy where it will be milled into flour for pasta. This is her 4th visit to the Twin Ports; she was here 3 other times in November of 2008, 2010 and 2014. On each trip, as today, she will load grain at the CHS 1 grain terminal in Superior.
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She had help from 2 Great Lakes Towing tugs, the Minnesota on her stern and the Arkansas on the bow.
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Palmerton arrives

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The Palmerton arrived under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge on Sunday afternoon, December 14, 2014 with structural steel to discharge at the Port Terminal. Below, she gets an assist from the Heritage Marine tug Helen H.
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Mamry joins a kayaker

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The Mamry has been sitting at anchor for a week or more but may finally come in this evening (December 6, 2014), leaving our friendly kayaker alone on the lake. She probably won’t be the last salt water ship to leave the port. She will replace the Erieborg at Gavilon in Superior tonight. Salt water traffic still to come this season will be the Juno, Palmerton (first visit), Pacific Huron, Sundaisy E. (first visit), Federal Saguenay, the Sea Racer (first visit) and the Bluebill. One of them may be the last saltwater ship to leave the port. That usually happens around December 20. The last ship will have no trouble leaving Lake Superior; the Soo Locks will not close until January 15. The Welland Canal closing on December 26th is the target they will have to beat, otherwise they will spend the winter inside the St. Lawrence Seaway, making for an expensive winter for the owner of the ship. They have until 4 pm on December 31st to get through the seaway locks east of the Welland. The Federal Sakura was the last to leave in 2013, the Nogat in 2010, the BBC Italy in 2009, the Beluga Revolution in 2008, and the Federal Rhine in 2005

Kom comes to Duluth for Thanksgiving

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kompaulscinoccanov-272014There are many reasons why Paul Scinocca (above) is a better photographer than I am. One is his ability to get down and dirty when taking a picture. I might try that sometime (not); getting back up would be the hard part. BTW, the temperature on this Thanksgiving morning, November 26, 2014 was 4 degrees and that is the Kom coming in from Lake Superior. And most important, click the picture in the insert here for a larger version of result of Paul’s effort.
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We welcome the Kom to Duluth. She was built in 1997 in Varna, Bulgaria, the city where her owner started business in 1890. All her officers and crew are from Bulgaria. We seldom see ships that maintain such a national identity over a long period of time. (She does fly a Maltese flag, but it is only a ‘flag of convenience.’) She will carry her cargo of wheat she is now loading at the CHS terminal to Italy.
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Two saltwater ships at the Port Terminal

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The Muntgracht arrived Duluth on November 11, 2014, on her first trip to the Twin Ports. Above, she discharged machinery at the Port Terminal that will be loaded onto trucks that will carry it to its final destination in the Twin Cities. Below, the Yulia arrived Duluth on November 7, 2014 to discharge kaolin clay at the Port Terminal. She discharged that same cargo on her first trip here in June, 2013. She will soon depart Duluth to load grain in Thunder Bay.
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Vikingbank follows Federal Satsuki

Like the Satsuki, she will load grain at the Gavilon Elevator, the former Peavey elevator

Federal Satsuki departs with grain

… on October 31, 2014

Discharging cement and loading grain

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The Algoma Montrealais arrived Duluth early this morning to discharge a cargo of cement at the Holcim dock in Duluth. Holly Jorgenson took the picture above while the freighter was at the cement dock; she also took the picture of the Isadora below while the boat was loading grain at the CHS 2 dock in Superior. This is the 18th visit the Polish owned Isadora has made to Duluth since she was built in 1999. This is the 82nd visit for the Montrealais since 1996; she of course made many more here from when she was built in 1962 to 1996; I just wasn’t here for them.
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Arkansas gets to work quickly

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The tug Arkansas arrived here on October 17th, 2014.  Two days later, Carole Lent got a nice shot of her helping the Orla move through the Duluth harbor on the 19th. The Orla picked up a cargo of wheat at CHS in Superior.

Ruddy departed Duluth on Oct 15, 2014

For more information about the Ruddy and this visit, go here.

Ruddy makes 2nd trip to Duluth

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The Ruddy came under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge around 4 am today (October 13, 2014). This is her 2nd trip here, her first came on September 16, 2012 when she loaded grain at CHS. Today, she is loading grain at Riverland Ag, formerly the Cargill elevator. She is under contract to Canfornav. We see many of their boats, mostly named after ducks (Bluebill, Greenwing, Mottler). This one, I think, is named after the Ruddy Duck, not to be confused with the rubber duck in your bathtub. The male of the species attracts the female by beating his bill on the water to make bubbles. Just thought you’d like to know but don’t make too many bubbles.

Federal Yukon departs Duluth

The Federal Yukon departed Duluth late afternoon on October 8, 2014 with a cargo of grain loaded at CHS. This was her 9th trip here since she was built in 2000.

Merwedegracht arrives with the surf

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The Merwedegracht arrived Duluth at 9 am, September 10, 2014 with wind turbine pieces to discharge at the Port Terminal.
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Just after the Merwedegracht cleared the Lift Bridge, the local pilot boat, Sea Bear, approached the ship, and the ladder that had been dropped from the deck. The ship was taking a second pilot for the docking at the Port Terminal; a precaution due to the weather, particularly high wind.
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With the pilot on the ship, the Sea Bear pulled away and two Great Lakes Towing tugs guided the ship to her berth at the Port Terminal.
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Volgaborg arrives Duluth for 5th trip

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The Dutch flagged Volgaborg arrived Duluth on August 31, 2014 on her way to load grain at Gavilon in Superior while the Vista Queen passed behind her. The Volgaborg was built in 2013 and made 3 trips here that first year. She loaded beet pulp pellets at GM, on her first trip last summer, bentonite at Hallett #5 on the second trip and grain on the 3rd trip. She was also here in June this year to load more beet pulp pellets. This is a new design for Wagenborg Shipping in The Netherlands. Most salt water ships are rounded in the stern; this boat is built more like a barge, with a modified bow to cut through large waves on the oceans.
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Presque Isle, then the HHL Congo

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After days of rain and fog, Monday morning dawned with fog but no rain and by late morning, not much fog. Time to reward the visitors to the Duluth ship canal with a 2-fer. The Presque Isle was first, in the center background, followed by the HHL Congo which had arrived over night with wind turbine parts to discharge at the Port Terminal. After a short wait at anchor, she followed the Presque Isle in. Built in 2011, the HHL Congo was here twice in 2012 with no trips last season. This is her first trip this season. The Presque Isle is making her 5th appearance this year; she was here 12 times last season.
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Fortunagracht comes to Duluth

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It is nice to have the Fortunagracht here to discharge wind turbine pieces but other ships have done that. Earlier this year, she made Great Lakes history when she was the first ship to deliver containerized cargo to Cleveland for the new service, Cleveland-Europe Express.   From Crain’s Cleveland Business: The Fortunagracht arrived in Cleveland late on Friday, April 18, loaded with containers of consumer and industrial goods, wind energy parts, machinery and other industrial equipment. It is expected to make monthly calls on Cleveland through the end of 2014.
After doing several round trips on the new route, she loaded wind turbine equipment to bring to Duluth, arriving at the Port Terminal (above) early this morning (August 4, 2014).
Check out this video, a bit dramatic but interesting…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gyL2sZN9JOs
… and some activity on Twitter…
https://twitter.com/hashtag/fortunagracht

Three boats at the end of the day

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The Heloise came in from the anchorage at 6:30 in the evening of July 30, 2014. Right behind her, fishing boats were going home for the day while the tug Kentucky gave an assist to the Heloise as she made her way over to CHS 1 to load grain.

More on the Reggeborg

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Wagenborg Shipping in The Netherlands sent the picture above showing her launching on December 18, 2013 and the additional information below.
On February 14th 2014, Shipyard Ferus Smit delivered the m.v. “Reggeborg” (yard number 404), which was christened and named on 18 December, 2013 by Mrs Marieke Reehoorn-Geerdink, to Royal Wagenborg.Over a timeframe of sixty years, this is now the third time that Wagenborg has taken a new built vessel into service with the name “Reggeborg”. The first ship was a 360 tons coaster, which rolled down the slipway at the former Shipyard Gebr. Coops in Hoogezand as the “Skald” in 1951 and was given the name “Reggeborg” in 1954. This was followed in 1994 by the open-top container carrier (558 TEU) “Reggeborg“ built at Verolme in Heusden.The new “Reggeborg” is a sister ship of the “Reestborg” (delivered in March 2013) and “Roerborg” (to be delivered in September next). The general details of the vessels are: l.o.a 169.75 metres, breadth 20.40 metres, moulded depth 13.75 metres. The three multi-purpose carriers, the largest ever taken into service by Wagenborg, are unique because of the combination of cargo capacity, hold dimensions and fuel consumption. The ships, which have two box shaped holds, are also the largest ever built by Ferus Smit. An extensive programme of towing tank tests has shown that the vessels can achieve a speed of approx. 14 knots and in ice they satisfy the stringent requirements of the Finnish-Swedish ice class 1A. The vessels are equipped with newly developed eco-bows. The advantages of this shape are, among others, a calmer handling and a higher speed at various depths. This also means that the engine capacity can be lowered, which has a positive effect on the fuel consumption. As a result, the ships can be labelled as being ‘very green’. The newly developed bow was used for the first time in a slightly smaller format on the “Vikingbank”, the “Vlieborg” and the “Volgaborg”, which were built at Ferus Smit in Westerbroek and delivered, respectively, on 19 April 2012, 28 September 2012 and 8 April 2013.

Under the command of captain Koos Boer, the “Reggeborg” started her maiden voyage shortly after the delivery. The ship was bound for Hargshamn, where iron ore had to be taken on board for Stettin.

Read about the Reggeborg from an expert

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Captain Ed Montgomery shared the following thoughts with me and I share them with you. Ed owns Sea Service, L.L.C. and operates the Pilot Boat that is often seen going out to ships at anchor. Words are his; Pictures are mine as she came into port this afternoon (July 7, 2014) (Click pics for larger image).
20140707842Just a tidbit of info that I thought you and your readers might find interesting. The M/V REGGEBORG will be proceeding to the Hallett 6 Dock. She is a newbuild from Wagenborg Shipping and is their largest owned ocean vessel. She was built at Ferus Smit ship yard in Leer, Ostfriesland, Germany and launched on 12 December, 2013.
20140707845 She is the 2nd of the “R Class” (REESTBORG was the first), as Wagenborg terms it and features their “Econ-Bow”, which is engineered to improve sea keeping handling traits and fuel efficiency. At first glance, the unique bow design seems to be a throwback to the WW-I British Dreadnaughts and U.S. Battleship’s plumb bows, with the forward-most bow stems being nearly straight up and perpendicular to the waterline. However, it is the result of high powered computer high-tech nautical engineering that the old war horses never had.
20140707853 The REGGEBORG’s bow is a version of a recent  hydrodynamic design development called the “Axe-Bow” from it’s origin at Norway’s Ulstein Group Shipyards. English and North American yards have adopted it as the “X-Bow”. The design affords the vessel to make better speed and improved fuel mileage by inherently avoiding the unavoidable ‘slamming’of the typical forward pitched stem and flared bow that most vessels are built with.
20140707859 The REGGEBORG is the first vessel in this series to have a five level deckhouse, versus the previously planned four level accommodation’s block on the initial series ship, the REESTBORG).  This was changed to give the crew better sightlines when transporting unusually high special project cargoes.
The vessel is named for the Regge (pronounced “R-r-r-regch’d”), a heavily ‘canalized’ tributary in the Netherlands.

Here in the Twin Ports, we have seen this type of new bow on only one other vessel, which I believe was the M/V VIKINGBANK that loaded at General Mills “A”, last year.

So, it appears that what was old, is now new again — and high tech, at that!   Take care, Ed.

Getting grain and iron ore pellets on a Sunday evening in Duluth

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After a week at anchor off the Duluth piers, the Raba came in on Sunday evening, June 29, 2014 and with the assistance of 2 Great Lakes Towing tugs, went over to the CHS dock in Superior to load grain. Earlier, the Mesabi Miner arrived and is here taking on fuel at the Calumet Fuel dock at the Port Terminal. Shortly after the Raba passed by her, she moved away from the fuel dock and went over to the CN in West Duluth to load iron ore pellets.
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Federal Mattawa crew to walk on solid ground

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The Federal Mattawa has been at anchor off the Duluth piers since May 19th. She finally came into port to load grain on Tuesday evening, June 10, 2014. For more information about her long wait, go here.
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