Lee A. Tregurtha draws a crowd & a flag

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The Lee A. Tregurtha arrived Duluth at 1:43 early in the afternoon of January 16, 2017. She was the last of 9 boats that will spend the winter layup in Duluth Superior.
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A large crowd and one flag welcomed them into the Duluth Ship Canal. That is Jason Fyten in the brown/orange coat below the flag taking a picture while his girl friend, Amanda Victorson waves their flag. Jason is a summer tour guide on the William A. Irvin. He purchased the flag at Anchor Bay Outfitters (At Anchor Bay Outfitters we live the Sailor life. We design Boat Watcher gear that is voted on and approved by our customers and friends. #BoatWatchersRock). The flag flew on the Irvin last summer and will probably be there again this coming summer.
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When you look at the flag from the front, as I seemed to have neglected to do, it reads: 
Boat
Watcher
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Arthur M. Anderson home for the winter

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The Great Lakes Fleet’s Arthur M. Anderson arrived Duluth for winter layup on Sunday, January 15, 2017 just after noon. This was her 22nd and last trip to Duluth this season. On most of those trips, she brought limestone in and then usually departed for Two Harbors where she loaded iron ore pellets
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John B. Aird departs Duluth, January 13, 2017

The John B. Aird arrived Duluth on January 12, 2017 to discharge salt at Hallett Dock #8. She left late this morning (Friday, January 13, 2017). See all the pictures below of her departure this morning. This was her 4th and last trip to the Twin Ports this season. On March 30, 2016, July 6th, 2016 and November 23, 2016, she was here to load iron ore pellets at the BNSF dock. She was here 3 times last year and 6 the year before.
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Barker last thousand footer to leave

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The James R. Barker departed Duluth late this afternoon (January 12, 2017) with a cargo of iron ore pellets she loaded at the CN dock in West Duluth. That is the Great Lakes Towing tug Kentucky assisting her through the Duluth harbor. She is the last 1,000 footer to depart the Twin Ports this season. Four other 1,000-footers are already in port for winter layup: the Paul R. Tregurtha, American Spirit, Burns Harbor and the American Century
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Assiniboine makes last trip out for 2017

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After discharging salt, the CSL Assiniboine went over to CN Duluth to load iron ore pellets. She departed on Monday afternoon, January 9, 2017, coming out of the St. Louis River and turning into the Duluth harbor above. She passed two American Steamship boats already in port for winter layup. That’s the American Century in the foreground and the American Spirit behind her. The tug North Carolina is seen just off the bow of the Assiniboine. She had made several passes through the track just ahead of the Assiniboine. She was also back at the CN dock earlier clearing some ice away. Below, she made it through the ice without much trouble and is seen below approaching the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge, just behind the Pier B Resort.
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Algolake drops salt twice

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After discharging salt at the Hallett #8 dock in Superior, the Algolake dropped the second  part of her inbound cargo at North American Salt Dock in Duluth (below). After backing away from the salt dock around noon on Sunday, January 8, 2017, she made a 180 turn just in front of Pier B Resort (see more below) and departed under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge.
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On her way out, she provided a pretty good show to those folks watching out their window at the Pier B Resort.
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Below, that’s the retired Coast Guard cutter Sundew providing the entertainment for those folks on the front side of the resort.
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Old year and Happy New year

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I am not a big fan of the ‘Christmas tree’ you see in the middle of the picture above rising up in front of the Frontenac as she came into port on Saturday morning, December 31, 2016. The lights are out at Bentleyville for another year, and soon, I hope, the tree will be gone. By then most of the vessel traffic will be over, but I will patiently wait for the new season, when the leaves will return to the trees, the branches of which are now visible framing my picture. But I am not complaining.  Below, is an unobstructed view of the Frontenac but by then, the sun was not a big help to my picture, but I am not complaining. Most should be so lucky to have Christmas trees, leaves and the sun to worry about.
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The Frontenac was here to load iron ore pellets at the CN in West Duluth. She departed, this morning at 5:00 (above). Below, the Whitefish Bay departed the port this morning, January 1, 2017, after discharging a cargo of salt at the Hallett #8 dock in Superior. I think she left here on her way to load iron ore pellets at the BN.
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With the Western end of Lake Superior available for parking this afternoon, the Paul R. Tregurtha sat just behind the American Integrity above, at the right, and below, a little closer. They were I think both waiting to load iron ore pellets at Two Harbors. But it is dark outside and AIS is still recovering  from New Years Eve, as I guess are all my usual sources. So I will go home and watch the last football game of the regular season.2017-0101-0603

CSL Laurentian departs after 8th trip this year

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The CSL Laurentien arrived here on December 28, 2016, coming through the Superior entry to load iron ore pellets at the BNSF dock. After that she went over to Calumet for fuel and departed (above) Thursday morning, December 29, 2016 at 11:30. This was her 8th trip to the Twin Ports this season. She loaded at BNSF on 5 of those trips. She also loaded coal at Midwest Energy twice and took iron ore pellets from the CN dock once.
She is most of the former Louis R Desmarais. In the winter of 2000-01, she had a brand new hull attached to the engine room of the Desmarais and received a new, state-of-the-art self-unloading system, and a new name. CSL stands for her owner’s name, Canada Steamship Lines of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

American Integrity replaced by the Herbert C. Jackson.

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Above, the American Integrity departed Duluth today (December 22, 2016) at 1:30 in the afternoon with 68,000 tons of coal loaded at Midwest Energy Resources. She will deliver a split load to Detroit Edison power plants at Monroe and St. Clair. This was her 31st trip to the Twin Ports this season; she made 30 trips last year.
The Herbert C. Jackson came in this morning at 10:56 and is seen below getting fuel at Calumet before taking the American Integrity’s place at Midwest Energy. She will load 16,000 tons of coal to take to Trenton, Michigan for the Trenton Channel Power Plant operated by Detroit Edison. The Jackson had her steam engine replaced with a new, energy-efficient diesel engine at Fraser Shipyards in Superior over the winter and departed the shipyard on September of this year. This is only her 4th trip here this season.
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Salt: in by boat, out by truck

The Algoway has only been here six times since 2003. She came under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge on Saturday afternoon, December 17, 2016 and deposited the large pile of salt you see in the picture just below. Since then, the pile has become a gathering spot for a lot of trucks,  a Black Friday for salt trucks. I took this picture early this morning (Tuesday morning, December 20, 2016). Below that is a picture I took of the Algowood depositing a similar pile at the Duluth Salt Dock, now known as Compass Minerals, on November 18, 2015.
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The Duluth plant distributes salt for a variety of uses, including consumer deicing and water conditioning,  bulk deicing for highways and mineral blocks for livestock.
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7 degrees, new ship, lots of people

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Just built this year, the Federal Columbia was greeted by lots of cold-loving Duluthians this afternoon (December 10, 2016) as she arrived to load wheat at CHS in Superior. It will be only the second cargo she has carried.
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She was Emilie, now she is Sunda

When I first heard that the Sunda was coming to Duluth, I was happy to see another ship making her first trip to Duluth. On further review, that call on the field was over ruled; the ship made one other trip here, on May 17, 2011 when she arrived as the Emilie to load grain at CHS. At the top, you see her new name on the side of her hull. To the right, you can see where that name was painted over her former name, which you can see, prior to her sale, below. We welcome all ships to Duluth, new ships and old ships, new names and old names.

3rd trip with clay for Yulia

The Yulia came under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge on December 1, 2016 with a cargo of Kaolin clay. She was built as the Harlequin in 2011 but later that year, she became the Yulia. The clay is not only another cargo brought to Duluth; it has become a new local industry at Lake Superior Warehousing, at the Port Authority. Below is some information from the Port Authority’s Summer, 2013 issue of their quarterly, North Star Port.

Kaolin is a hydrated aluminum silicate crystalline mineral used as a bulking agent or filler in a variety of industries including ceramics, paper, paint, plastics, rubber, sealant, adhesive and chemicals manufacturing. This particular clay adds gloss/shininess in papermaking and is being mined, refined and shipped by IMERYS.
The world’s largest producer of quality kaolin, IMERYS has deposits and production plants in the UK, U.S., Australia and Brazil. The product arrives in bulk as a powder, which is conveyed indoors to a building at the Port Terminal for further processing into a slurry for final delivery by tanker truck to customers in the region.

Labrador, first trip here, loading wheat

After discharging cargo in Hamilton, Ontario, the Labrador came to Duluth, arriving off the Duluth piers on November 28, 2016. The next day, she came in under the Lift Bridge (above) and is now loading wheat at Riverland Ag. She arrived in the St. Lawrence Seaway around November 17. She made a previous trip to the seaway in late August this year, first discharging cargo in Hamilton and then loading grain in Thunder Bay.
This ship is currently working for Canfornav, a member of the Canadian Forest Navigation Group in Montreal, and is one of many of their ships that comelabradorduck to Duluth. Many are named for ducks, such as Bluewing, Greenwing and Mandarin, to name a few. I assume their Labrador vessel is named for the duck of the same name. Unfortunately, the duck is believed to be extinct, at least since the late 1800’s. There are however some theories that it never existed, or that it is not really extinct, just rarely seen. If it did exist, it is believed to have spent the summer in breeding grounds off Labrador. So I guess, the ship could be named for either the duck or the province in Canada where the duck spent its summers, if it did exist.
The Labrador was assisted by two Great Lakes Towing tugs. The Arkansas (above) on her bow and the Kentucky (below) on her bow.

Christmas note cards for sale

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Power to Minnesota from Germany

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The BBC Mont Blanc arrived in Duluth very early on November 18, 2016. She brought with her 4  power generation units built by Caterpillar in Germany that are being discharged at the Port Terminal (above).

Philip R. Clarke departs after 19th trip here

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The Philip R. Clarke departed Duluth late morning on Saturday, November 19, 2016. While here, she discharged limestone at the Hallett #5 dock and then went next door to load  iron ore pellets at the CN dock. She loaded fuel on her arrival. This was her 19th trip here this season; she made 17 visits last year. During the year, she loads limestone at, among other ports, Calcite and Stoneport, both in Michigan and discharges it at Detroit, Duluth, Gary  and Toledo. She loads iron ore pellets at both the CN docks in Duluth and Two Harbors, delivering that cargo to Gary. She was built by the American Ship Building Company in 1952 at Lorain, one of three built for the Pittsburgh Steamship Company. The others were the Arthur M. Anderson and the Cason J. Callaway, both of which visit Duluth often during the year.

Federal Maas here for grain

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Built in 1997, the Federal Maas first came here on December 1, 1998. She arrived on   November 7, 2016 (above) to load grain at Riverland Ag in Duluth (below). On July 24, 2012, she brought mining machinery she loaded in France for Saskatchewan to discharge at the Port Terminal. She was back in September, 2014 with more machinery. Today is her 11th trip to the Twin Ports. That is the faithful Cornelia seen at anchor between the Maas and the South light base.
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World Wide Web is world wide

Sometimes, the World Wide Web is really world wide. The Roerborg arrived in Duluth early Monday afternoon (October 31, 2016). Third mate Daniel Schaafsma was just outside the pilot house waving to people welcoming him and his ship to Duluth. Later, he told me he was surprised to see so many people watching them come in. I took a picture of the ship’s arrival but failed to notice the very small figure waving to us from the top of the ship. His grandparents in The Netherlands were watching the Marine Museum web cam and they knew right away who that small speck at the top of the ship was.
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They added a comment on the page, in Dutch

Ha, die Daan.
We. opa, Guus en oma hebben zien varen en naar he gezwaaid.
Wat een grote boot is de Roerborg zeg. Leuk dat we je daar zagen staan on de vleugel.
We wenen je een goede vaart en een behouden thuiskomst.
Dag lieverd, we houden van je.
Guus, Op en Oma Gerritsen van der Hoop Harlingen. Nederland.

Which Google translated as:

Ha, which Daan.
We. grandpa, grandma Guus and have seen sail and swung huh. What a great boat say the Ruhr Borg. Nice that we saw you standing there on the wing. We weep you a good trip and a safe return Day, sweetheart, we love you. Guus On and Grandma Gerritsen van der Hoop Harlingen. Netherlands.

Google does some things better than others, but his Mother, Jenny, then added a comment in English thanking us for the connection. Such a nice comment deserved a nice response so I went over to the ship to talk to Daniel. He did not know about the comments yet; I shared them with him and then took his picture so I could share that with his parents and grandparents, and of  course readers of the Duluth Shipping News. Daniel, who lives in the town of Dronryp, is two years out of Maritime Academy. Last year, he was an apprentice and visited Duluth aboard the Erieborg. This year, he comes here as the third mate on the Roerborg.

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Below, the Roerborg was waiting at the Port Terminal this morning before moving over to CHS to load grain.
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Cornelia discharging cement

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The Cornelia is back in town, currently discharging cement at the CRH US dock  (formerly Holcim, and before that St. Lawrence Cement) in Duluth above.

Cornelia returns to the scene of the crime

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The Cornelia, under new ownership, I am told, returned to Duluth this afternoon, Sunday, October 16, 2016. Below, she got an assist from the Heritage Marine tug Helen H.  Go here to read about the ‘crime’
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Speer makes rare visit to Duluth

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The Edgar B. Speer arrived through the Duluth ship canal this morning (October 10, 2016) at 11:20. She is currently at the Port Terminal taking a short delay. This is only the 3rd time this season we have seen her in Duluth, and she will likely leave here to load iron ore pellets in Two Harbors. She has been a regular visitor in Two Harbors all season, going there for iron ore pellets about 5 times a month. She takes most, if not all, of the Two Harbors pellets to steel mills in Gary, Indiana. This year she did load iron ore pellets at the BNSF Superior on June 14th and at CN Duluth on August 22nd.

The versatile Tim S. Dool

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Above, the Tim S. Dool was loading wheat this morning (October 4, 2016) at Riverland Ag, formerly the Cargill elevator, in Duluth.  She carries a variety of cargos, including iron ore pellets, cement and grain. She arrived here October 1 to discharge cement at Holcim. She then went out into the Lake to wash out her cargo holds before coming back in to load the wheat at Riverland. She was here 4 times in May to load iron ore pellets at BNSF. On one of those trips she brought in cement for Holcim. In June, they came in 4 times to load iron ore pellets and again, bringing cement in once to discharge before loading the pellets. She was here twice in September to load iron ore pellets at the BNSF. Before 2015, she only made a couple trips here a year but she was here 10 times last season; this is her 15 trip this year.

L. L. Smith bids good bye to Twin Ports

The L. L. Smith, sold by the University of Wisconsin, Superior to a private party a year ago, departed today (September 29, 2016) for Washburn for the winter. For more on the Smith.
[KGVID width=”560″ height=”315″]http://duluthshippingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/llsmithsept2016a.mp4[/KGVID]

Arnold Palmer 1929-2016

I was proud to be part of the millions of people who watched and rooted for Arnold Palmer and as in this picture, lined up to get his autograph. I had to fight Sid Hartmann for his attention, which was not easy but I got the autograph. This was in the early 80’s, I think at the Senior Open at Hazeltine National Golf Club in Minneapolis. I grew up in Pittsburgh, Arnie grew up and lived until this past weekend when he died, in Latrobe, a small city outside of Pittsburgh

arnoldpalmerI graduated from high school in 1961; that year, Arnie won the following tournaments: San Diego Open Invitational, Phoenix Open Invitational, Baton Rouge Open Invitational, Texas Open Invitational, Western Open and the British Open.

I was a fan for life. My big moments; I had lunch at the Latrobe Country Club with his first wife, Winnie. Or rather, a friend took me to lunch there and Winnie was around welcoming guests and knew my friend. She didn’t really eat lunch with me but she did sit down at the table with us for a moment or two.

And I shared a drink with Arnie during the US Amateur Open at Oakmont Country Club in 1969. Ok, I didn’t actually share a drink with him. I was a clubhouse Pinkerton guard and watched him visit with the bartender. I should have paid more attention to other matters, such as the stolen golf bags, taken from the club house. That led the coverage of the tournament in the Pittsburgh Press the next day. 

Before hearing of his death yesterday, Sunday, I was in fact, drinking his iced tea. And I am proud to be a member, along with millions of others all over the world, of Arnie’s Army. And unlike fans of other sports figures, Arnold Palmer kept in close touch with all of us, and he touched all of us, especially now, that he is gone.

Short video about Arnold Palmer at the New York Times today.