New dock groundbreaking set for May 27, 2015

On Wednesday, May 27, 2015, the Duluth Seaway Port Authority will host a groundbreaking ceremony for the Port of Duluth Intermodal Project which will feature a complete rebuild of docks C & D. The area has been cleaned up over the last 20 years and today, it is ready to go (just below). (all photos courtesy Duluth Seaway Port Authority)
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Below, a Port Authority graphic outlines the improvements to be made. At the upper left, you see the gantry cranes in operation as they have since they were built in 1959, the year the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway opened the port of Duluth to the rest of the world.
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And speaking of 1959, the picture below shows the same area as it looked in 1959. Notice more ships in port than we usually see but much smaller ships.
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One of the first jobs in clearing away the old for the new was the demolition of the exiting structures, no longer in use. That was in 1997.
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Below, as she looked a few years ago. Notice the area that will be developed  was used as a holding area for cargo shipped to Duluth by boat but not yet  delivered, by truck, to the customer. Most of the cargo in the lay down area were wind turbine parts.
Dock-C D_Pano

Bringing fish in; getting coal to take out

Fishing boat passes behind Mesabi Miner as Miner enters Duluth harbor
The Mesabi Miner made a surprise visit to the Twin Ports today (July 26, 2011), first for fuel and then over to Midwest Energy to load coal. The fishing boat Opti 1 came in at the same time, hopefully with a cargo of fish.

Big news–no fog-see boats

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The Frontenac (center) came under the Lift Bridge at 6:41 this morning (June 23, 2011) and went to the Murphy Fuel Dock to get fuel. The American Integrity (right) came under the Lift Bridge an hour and 6 minutes later. She was waiting for the Frontenac to complete before getting  fuel  herself and then going to the CN dock to load iron ore pellets. The Integrity slowed down, almost to the stop  just after moving around the turning buoy. The Mesabi Miner (left) was approaching the Lift Bridge, noticed the Integrity sitting there and called  up to determine where the two boats should be after the Miner arrived in the harbor. The Integrity gave her a choice, the Miner said, ok, how about you move over behind the Frontenac and I will pass on the left on my way to Midwest Energy Resources to load coal. And that is how the above picture came into be.

Federal Yukon here to load grain for Italy

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The Federal Yukon arrived off the Duluth piers Saturday night, June 4th, 2011 and dropped anchor to wait for morning before coming in. At 7 Sunday morning, she came under the Lift Bridge and was escorted to her dock at CHS in Superior by 2 Great Lakes Towing tugs (above). This is her 8th trip to the Twin Ports since she was built in 2000. She is loading a cargo of wheat for Italy, a country often visited by ships that load wheat here. And yes, the kind of wheat they load here is used to make Italian pasta there.
In July, 2006, she was only the second foreign flagged vessel to load iron ore pellets at the BN dock in Superior. She delivered the pellets to a Mittal Steel plant in Algeria. Mittal also has a financial interest in Hibbing Taconite up on the Iron Range, the source for the pellets.

Two sister ships from Greece pass each other in Duluth

Olympic Miracle passes the Olympic Melody in the Duluth harbor
The Olympic Melody departed Duluth just as her sister ship Olympic Miracle was arriving. Both loaded grain at CHS 1 in Superior so the Miracle was indeed taking over for the Melody

Watching the dredge

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The Duluth ship canal is officially a ship channel, meaning it is maintained at a depth of around 30 feet at all times so that large 1,000 footers and ocean going ships can move safely thru the channel on their way in and out of Duluth. To maintain that depth, the channel has to be periodically dredged since wave action and propeller blades can build up silt, especially around the edges of the channel. Marine Tech moved their dredge out to the South Pier today, just beside the South Pier light, to work on some of the edges of the channel. They will be there for about 3 weeks providing another sight for visitors to look at and for today, something for the crew aboard the Tuscarora to watch while they wait at anchor to come into port to load grain.
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A visit from the Calumet is …

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… always appreciated, and so she was as she came into the Duluth harbor early Sunday morning, July 18, 2010.