Archives for November 2016

Labrador, first trip here, loading wheat

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This is a test row that i just added
After discharging cargo in Hamilton, Ontario, the Labrador came to Duluth, arriving off the Duluth piers on November 28, 2016. The next day, she came in under the Lift Bridge (above) and is now loading wheat at Riverland Ag. She arrived in the St. Lawrence Seaway around November 17. She made a previous trip to the seaway in late August this year, first discharging cargo in Hamilton and then loading grain in Thunder Bay.
This ship is currently working for Canfornav, a member of the Canadian Forest Navigation Group in Montreal, and is one of many of their ships that comelabradorduck to Duluth. Many are named for ducks, such as Bluewing, Greenwing and Mandarin, to name a few. I assume their Labrador vessel is named for the duck of the same name. Unfortunately, the duck is believed to be extinct, at least since the late 1800’s. There are however some theories that it never existed, or that it is not really extinct, just rarely seen. If it did exist, it is believed to have spent the summer in breeding grounds off Labrador. So I guess, the ship could be named for either the duck or the province in Canada where the duck spent its summers, if it did exist.
The Labrador was assisted by two Great Lakes Towing tugs. The Arkansas (above) on her bow and the Kentucky (below) on her bow.

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Christmas note cards for sale

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Power to Minnesota from Germany

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The BBC Mont Blanc arrived in Duluth very early on November 18, 2016. She brought with her 4  power generation units built by Caterpillar in Germany that are being discharged at the Port Terminal (above).

Philip R. Clarke departs after 19th trip here

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The Philip R. Clarke departed Duluth late morning on Saturday, November 19, 2016. While here, she discharged limestone at the Hallett #5 dock and then went next door to load  iron ore pellets at the CN dock. She loaded fuel on her arrival. This was her 19th trip here this season; she made 17 visits last year. During the year, she loads limestone at, among other ports, Calcite and Stoneport, both in Michigan and discharges it at Detroit, Duluth, Gary  and Toledo. She loads iron ore pellets at both the CN docks in Duluth and Two Harbors, delivering that cargo to Gary. She was built by the American Ship Building Company in 1952 at Lorain, one of three built for the Pittsburgh Steamship Company. The others were the Arthur M. Anderson and the Cason J. Callaway, both of which visit Duluth often during the year.

Cornelia in, to replace the departing Federal Maas

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The Cornelia came in from her anchorage (above) this afternoon (November 10, 2016). After a short wait at the Port Terminal, she will move over to Riverland Ag this evening to replace the Federal Maas, that left the dock about an hour later going off to deliver her cargo.
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Federal Maas here for grain

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Built in 1997, the Federal Maas first came here on December 1, 1998. She arrived on   November 7, 2016 (above) to load grain at Riverland Ag in Duluth (below). On July 24, 2012, she brought mining machinery she loaded in France for Saskatchewan to discharge at the Port Terminal. She was back in September, 2014 with more machinery. Today is her 11th trip to the Twin Ports. That is the faithful Cornelia seen at anchor between the Maas and the South light base.
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World Wide Web is world wide

Sometimes, the World Wide Web is really world wide. The Roerborg arrived in Duluth early Monday afternoon (October 31, 2016). Third mate Daniel Schaafsma was just outside the pilot house waving to people welcoming him and his ship to Duluth. Later, he told me he was surprised to see so many people watching them come in. I took a picture of the ship’s arrival but failed to notice the very small figure waving to us from the top of the ship. His grandparents in The Netherlands were watching the Marine Museum web cam and they knew right away who that small speck at the top of the ship was.
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They added a comment on the page, in Dutch

Ha, die Daan.
We. opa, Guus en oma hebben zien varen en naar he gezwaaid.
Wat een grote boot is de Roerborg zeg. Leuk dat we je daar zagen staan on de vleugel.
We wenen je een goede vaart en een behouden thuiskomst.
Dag lieverd, we houden van je.
Guus, Op en Oma Gerritsen van der Hoop Harlingen. Nederland.

Which Google translated as:

Ha, which Daan.
We. grandpa, grandma Guus and have seen sail and swung huh. What a great boat say the Ruhr Borg. Nice that we saw you standing there on the wing. We weep you a good trip and a safe return Day, sweetheart, we love you. Guus On and Grandma Gerritsen van der Hoop Harlingen. Netherlands.

Google does some things better than others, but his Mother, Jenny, then added a comment in English thanking us for the connection. Such a nice comment deserved a nice response so I went over to the ship to talk to Daniel. He did not know about the comments yet; I shared them with him and then took his picture so I could share that with his parents and grandparents, and of  course readers of the Duluth Shipping News. Daniel, who lives in the town of Dronryp, is two years out of Maritime Academy. Last year, he was an apprentice and visited Duluth aboard the Erieborg. This year, he comes here as the third mate on the Roerborg.

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Below, the Roerborg was waiting at the Port Terminal this morning before moving over to CHS to load grain.
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