UMD STEM Students out on the Blue Heron

UMD stands for University of Minnesota at Duluth. STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. These are STEM students from UMD going out on UMD’s research vessel Blue Heron this morning (Saturday, September 10, 2016). They are freshmen, just two weeks into their college career; a good time to go down and introduce yourself to Lake Superior. This is also UMD STEM students studying Limnology (see below). All this is coordinated by Rachel Breckenridge (4th from the left, above),  an instructor in the Mathematics and Statistics Department at UMD. When not teaching Calculus I, Calculus II, Calculus III, and Intro to Contemporary Mathematics, she created and runs their Math Prep for STEM Careers summer program.
From Wikipedia: Limnology, (/lɪmˈnɒlədʒi/ lim-nol-ə-jee; from Greek λίμνη, limne, “lake” and λόγος, logos, “knowledge”), is the study of inland waters. It is often regarded as a division of ecology or environmental science. It covers the biological,chemical, physical, geological, and other attributes of all inland waters (running and standing waters, both fresh and saline, natural or man-made). This includes the study of lakes and ponds, rivers, springs, streams and wetlands.[1] A more recent sub-discipline of limnology, termed landscape limnology, studies, manages, and conserves these aquatic ecosystems using a landscape perspective.

Limnology is closely related to aquatic ecology and hydrobiology, which study aquatic organisms in particular regard to their hydrological environment. Although limnology is sometimes equated with freshwater science, this is erroneous since limnology also comprises the study of inland salt lakes.

Kenneth Newhams :