Science Friday at the Duluth ship canal

The Blue Heron returned home this afternoon (June 5, 2015) after a six day research trip to recover and redeploy a set of scientific moorings deployed throughout Lake Superior.  Moorings collect data that are used to study lake water warming and  changing ice conditions on the lake and to study internal waves in Lake Superior. The Blue Heron is owned by the Large Lakes Observatory at the University of Minnesota at Duluth and is often on the lake working with water quality issues, fish populations and the geo physical structure of Lake Superior.
She is the largest university-owned research vessel in the Great Lakes. Built in 1985 for fishing on the Grand Banks, the Blue Heron was purchased by the University of Minnesota in 1997. She sailed from Portland, Maine, up the St. Lawrence Seaway to Duluth, and was converted into a limnological research vessel during the winter of 1997-98. She is outfitted with state-of-the-art research equipment. The Blue Heron has berthing for 9 crew and scientists, and can operate 24 hours per day for up to 14 days in between port calls. She is part of the University National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS), and is available for charter by research scientists on any of the Great Lakes. She served in the Grand Banks fishing fleet until the federal government bought the vessel through an incentive program to protect the depleted fishery.
The Blue Heron returned home this afternoon (June 5, 2015) after a six day research trip to recover and redeploy a set of scientific moorings deployed throughout Lake Superior.  Moorings collect data that are used to study lake water warming and  changing ice conditions on the lake and to study internal waves in Lake Superior.
The Blue Heron is owned by the Large Lakes Observatory at the University of Minnesota at Duluth and is often on the lake working with water quality issues, fish populations and the geo physical structure of Lake Superior.
She is the largest university-owned research vessel in the Great Lakes. Built in 1985 for fishing on the Grand Banks, the Blue Heron was purchased by the University of Minnesota in 1997. She sailed from Portland, Maine, up the St. Lawrence Seaway to Duluth, and was converted into a limnological research vessel during the winter of 1997-98. She is outfitted with state-of-the-art research equipment.
The Blue Heron has berthing for 9 crew and scientists, and can operate 24 hours per day for up to 14 days in between port calls. She is part of the University National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS), and is available for charter by research scientists on any of the Great Lakes. She served in the Grand Banks fishing fleet until the federal government bought the vessel through an incentive program to protect the depleted fishery.
Kenneth Newhams :