Archives for June 2015

HHL Volga brings more wind turbine blades to Duluth

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After half a day at the outside anchorage, the HHL Volga came in Sunday afternoon, June 28, 2015, with a cargo of wind turbine blades she will begin discharging on Monday morning. She is the former Beluga Family when she was operated by Beluga Shipping in Bremen, Germany. After Beluga went bankrupt, the ship was purchased by Hansa Heavy Lift, also in Bremen. Although many Beluga ships have been to Duluth before, this will be the first visit for this ship. This is, I think, the 3rd shipment of wind turbine pieces to come to Duluth this season. There are more coming.

Friday night, let’s have a party

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The salt water vessel Eider (the green one) came into port on June 16th to discharge a lot of pipe at the Port Terminal. Eleven days later (June 26, 2015), they are still here. Maybe they decided to test out Duluth night life and invite a few new friends over. The Great Republic (in the middle) and the James R. Barker (in back) arrived on time, but it appears the Barker had to leave early; must be another party in Superior.

Paul R brings Detroit Free Press to Duluth

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The Paul R. Tregurtha came under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge this morning at 9:00. Jim Schaefer, reporter for the paper, was streaming the arrival live via Periscope from his cell phone. My guess is, this is the first live video from a boat coming under the Bridge. Periscope is a program recently published by Google that allows live streaming via cell phone, which is to say we now all have  television stations in our pocket. And I thought the World Wide Web was impressive. This may be the best way to follow the trip, or, if they are leaving the boat here, to see their past videos of the trip. https://twitter.com/DetroitReporter
and follow Jim on Twitter: @DetroitReporter where you will be notified when he goes live; at least a couple times yet today. Only 3  problems; like a lot of new cell phone camera persons, it is a little bumpy and Periscope has not yet learn how to do landscape. And worst of all, Jim calls those of us watching from the dock, Freighter Watchers. I have informed him, via Twitter, that we are Boatwatchers.

Duluth/Superior, an International port

Two ships: Whistler and Eider, 5 countries: US, Greece, Venezuela, Hong Kong (China), Algeria and 3 states: Wisconsin, Texas and Minnesota, at least
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In the top picture, the Whistler is leaving Duluth on Thursday evening, June 18, 2015, after loading durum wheat at the CHS terminal in Superior. She arrived on June 13 and dropped her anchor while she waited for the Drawsko to finish loading spring wheat. On Monday evening (June 15, 2015), the Whistler came in as the Drawsko was departing for Venezuela and took her place at CHS. The Whistler began her trip to the Twin Ports after discharging cargo in Houston in early April. She loaded durum wheat here that she is now taking to Algeria. Because of the ice, ocean going ships cannot come to Duluth or enter the St. Lawrence Seaway from mid-December to mid-March. During our winter, many of those ships load the same grain they load here in ports in the Southern United States, brought down the Mississippi River by barge from Midwestern farms. The Whistler is such a ship.
whistlerduckaudabon The Whistler is owned by Parakou Shipping in Hong Kong. She is now under charter to Canadian Forest Navigation (Canfornav for short). They send many ships to Duluth Superior to load grain. They name the ships they use after ducks. In her case, it is the Black-bellied Whistling-Duck that also can be found in Texas. As she was departing, she passed another Parakou ship, the Eider, while she was at the Port Terminal discharging 8,000 pieces of pipe she loaded in Greece. (Whistler picture from www.audubon.org)
2015-0618-1885I was about a mile away when I took this picture and it was only after preparing this web page post that I noticed 2 boats in the background, docked in Superior. Click on the image to enlarge it (you can do the same with the other three pictures). At the left, the Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. is at the Lakehead dock. To the right, you can see the stern and the bow of the American Victory; she is the former Middletown. Now owned by American Steamship, she was in long term layup at Fraser Shipyard but was moved while Fraser is doing some new construction work. She has the stack colors of American Steamship but retains her Columbia colors for everything else.
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Wow, Burns Harbor visits Duluth

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On June 13, 2015, the Burns Harbor made a surprise (at least to me) visit to the Duluth ship canal, coming in around 5:30 in the afternoon. Most of the time, she comes in using the Superior entry since she loads iron ore pellets at the BNSF dock just inside the entry. I think she needed fuel and is at the Calumet fuel dock in Duluth. And the brand new CSL St-Laurent is at the BN dock now (6:00 pm).
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Block departs Duluth

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The Joseph L. Block departed Duluth on Monday afternoon, June 8, 2015 after discharging a limestone cargo at Graymont. She is going to Two Harbors to load iron ore pellets. This was her 4th trip to Duluth Superior this season; she was here 15 times last year.

Science Friday at the Duluth ship canal

2015-0605-1734The Blue Heron returned home this afternoon (June 5, 2015) after a six day research trip to recover and redeploy a set of scientific moorings deployed throughout Lake Superior.  Moorings collect data that are used to study lake water warming and  changing ice conditions on the lake and to study internal waves in Lake Superior.
The Blue Heron is owned by the Large Lakes Observatory at the University of Minnesota at Duluth and is often on the lake working with water quality issues, fish populations and the geo physical structure of Lake Superior.
She is the largest university-owned research vessel in the Great Lakes. Built in 1985 for fishing on the Grand Banks, the Blue Heron was purchased by the University of Minnesota in 1997. She sailed from Portland, Maine, up the St. Lawrence Seaway to Duluth, and was converted into a limnological research vessel during the winter of 1997-98. She is outfitted with state-of-the-art research equipment.
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The Blue Heron has berthing for 9 crew and scientists, and can operate 24 hours per day for up to 14 days in between port calls. She is part of the University National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS), and is available for charter by research scientists on any of the Great Lakes. She served in the Grand Banks fishing fleet until the federal government bought the vessel through an incentive program to protect the depleted fishery.
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