Archives for December 2011

One Tregurtha out, another in

leeatregurtha20111226_0125 The Paul R. Tregurtha departed Duluth on Monday morning, December 26, 2011 after loading 64,000 tons of coal for her usual destination, the Detroit Edison power plant at St. Clair Michigan. A little over an hour later, the Lee A. Tregurtha (right) came in to get fuel and then load iron ore pellets at the CN dock in West Duluth.  An hour before, the Alder was out in the harbor but there was not much ice to break.

(Click each image for larger version)

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Boland leaves for Marquette

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The John J. Boland came into port around 2 am on Wednesday, December 21, 2011 to load coal at Midwest Energy in Superior. She left around 3:30 in the afternoon (above) for Marquette, Michigan.
Click below to hear her as she sounded a salute to the bridge, and to those of us greeting her:

Paul R, the Bridge and Bentleyville

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At 5:00 Sunday afternoon, December 18, 2011, the lights at Bentleyville were turned on. Half an hour later,  the Paul R. Tregurtha came by to say hello on her way out the door with a Christmas present for Detroit Edison, 64,000 tons of coal. If it is bad to get a lump of coal in your stocking, what happens when you get 64,000 tons of it?

Mackinaw here; maybe Thunder Bay later

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The Coast Guard cutter Mackinaw has been in the Twin Ports for a couple weeks for bow thruster repairs at the Fraser Shipyards. She is currently (Friday, December 16, 2011) moored at the DECC (above) but is expected to depart in the next couple days to begin another season of ice breaking on the Great Lakes.
111212-G-JL323-050 CGC Thunder Bay arrives in Cleveland

The US Coast Guard cutter Thunder Bay departed their home port in Rockland, Maine to come to the Great Lakes to assist in any ice breaking operations that may be needed. Bringing an east coast ship into the Great Lakes has been a Coast Guard tradition for some years, and provides them with an additional opportunity to cross train the crews and put the ship into a different environment, although the Thunder Bay is an ice breaking tug and is very good at that job. The 140-foot icebreaking tug was built to break ice; they use a low-pressure-air hull lubrication or bubbler system that forces air and water between the hull and ice. This system improves icebreaking capabilities by reducing resistance against the hull.

They arrived in Cleveland on December 12, 2011. Although currently based in Maine, she is named for the town of Thunder Bay, Michigan, on Lake Huron near Alpena.

First ice and a breaker!

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That is the Coast Guard cutter Biscayne Bay docked behind the DECC. Coincidently (??), the first ice of the season is just in front of her. I am entertaining captions for the picture. She has been here many times to help us fight the ice. Go to the Biscayne Bay page to see more pictures of her life and times while in Duluth Superior and a video from some years back.

Moezelborg discharges proppant …

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… loaded in Ust Luga, a relatively new Russian port, close to St. Petersburg. The Moezelborg arrived in Duluth at 1:57 am on Sunday morning, December 4, 2011.