Archives for August 2008

Beeghly arrives to friendly crowd

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The Charles M. Beeghly arrived last night to load iron ore pellets at the CN dock in West Duluth. The boat gave a double salute to acknowledge the large crowd that gathered to welcome it to Duluth (above). It was built in 1959 in Toledo and is 806 feet long, and is nearly identical to the John Sherwin, a boat that spent many years in the Twin Ports sitting idle. This is the 8th trip here this season for the Beeghly, more than the total trips it made in each of the last 5 years. Photo taken on August 30, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-31-2008

Flinterland on her way

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The Flinterland departed Duluth on Thursday afternoon with a ship full of blades. Most every available space in its two cargo holds and up on deck, see above, was filled with wind turbine blades going to Brazil. I am assured that the boat is very seaworthy but it doesn’t look like it when you consider it is going into the Atlantic Ocean and then turning right for Brazil. Along the way, they will be sailing right into the waters that kick up hurricanes this time of year. I am assured this is not a problem but wind turbine blades are built to catch wind and with that many blades on deck to catch the wind, it would seem like they could fly down to Brazil. They have several private services that watch the weather closely and send them advisories that include updated tracks they should follow to avoid difficult weather. They are also advised where the ship should go to wait out a storm, and I assume it tells them when to go to those places in time to get there. Photo taken on August 28, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-29-2008

Flinterland gets assist from cranes 1 & 2

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A lot of boats arrived in Duluth yesterday and that means a lot of boats will be departing Duluth today. The Dutch flagged Flinterland is one of those boats. It arrived at sunrise on Wednesday and began to load wind turbine blades for Brazil at 8 am. Above, you see the Port Terminal’s two gantry cranes loading one blade into the cargo hold of the ship while a truck brings the next blade to be loaded into position. The last blades will be loaded onto the deck of the ship and that will make for a pretty picture when it departs, probably later today. Photo taken on August 27, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-28-2008

Alpena arrives Duluth with usual cargo

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Within this year of the wind turbine in the Twin Ports, today is the ‘day of the wind turbine.’ We expect one ship, the BBC Plata, to depart the port after discharging wind turbine parts, one, the Flinterland, will arrive to load wind turbine parts, and another one, the SCL Bern, will be here to discharge wind turbine parts, although it will have to wait for the first two to finish. And until wind turbines take over, the folks at Midwest Energy will be loading 4 boats with coal today, all going to electrical power plants on the lower lakes. And the Alpena, seen above coming into port August, 2006, will bring cement as it usually does about once every 3 weeks.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-27-2008

Vancouverborg not going to Vancouver

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Wikipedia says that the Garganey is a dabbling duck. The Garganey that will arrive late tonight is a Hong Kong flagged and Chinese owned ship that was built last year and is now operating under a charter to Canadian Forest Navigation, sometimes known as Canfornav. They operate a lot of ships that they name after ducks. Many of them, such as the Puffin, the Pintail and the Greenwing, to name a few, have been to the Twin Ports, usually to load grain although the dabbling duck ship will be loading bentonite. Above, we see the Vancouverborg departing the port Monday afternoon with beet pulp pellets. Photo taken on August 25, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-26-2008

Miner leaves visitors wanting more ships

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Where is there a nicer boardwalk? In Duluth, you can go for a walk with a lighthouse on one side and a Great Lakes freighter on the other. Such was the case on Sunday as the Mesabi Miner departed the port with coal for Detroit Edison as many late summer visitors enjoyed a beautiful day by the ship canal (above). We have two salties in port today; the BBC Plata is discharging wind turbine parts and the Vancouverborg will leave with beet pulp pellets. A third one, the Federal Yukon, will arrive to load grain. On Tuesday, BBC Plata will depart and the Garganey will arrive for its first trip here. On Wednesday, two more first time visitors will be here; the Flinterland to load wind turbine parts and the SCL Bern to discharge them. Photo taken on August 24, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-24-2008

Edgar B. Speer in Duluth harbor

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The Edgar B. Speer, seen above moving down the Duluth harbor in October, 2004, was only here once last season but is expected today for the 7th time this year. Still it has spent most of the season loading iron ore pellets in Two Harbors. Gary will be the destination for today’s pellets, as it has been for most of the Speer’s loads out of the CN dock in Two Harbors.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-24-2008

Robert S. Pierson enters under the Aerial Lift Bridge

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The Canadian flagged Robert S. Pierson came under the Lift Bridge on Friday afternoon to load iron ore pellets at the CN dock in West Duluth (above). It is the 7th visit the boat has made to the Twin Ports this season, but the first time it has entered by way of the Duluth entry. The other trips were loading iron ore pellets at the BNSF Dock in Superior. It was formerly owned by Oglebay Norton as the US flagged Wolverine, and like all the Oglebay Norton fleet, was sold to other companies. Two sister boats, the Oglebay Norton’s William R. Roesch and Paul Thayer are now the Calumet and Manitowoc. Photo taken on August 22, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-23-2008

Federal Seto departing Duluth

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After a stop to discharge cargo in Hamilton, the Federal Seto arrived in Duluth on Thursday morning to load grain for Spain. Above, it is seen departing Duluth after its first trip here in 2004, the year it was built. It was back once in 2005 and once in 2006. Skipping 2007, it is now back for the 4th time. It is only the 4th salt water ship to arrive in August and the 1st to load grain. The other three brought wind turbine parts and general cargo. In July, only 2 salt water ships were here. The good news; for the first time in a while, more salties are scheduled to be in the Twin Ports in the next 2 weeks. Local officials hope it is the start of the fall harvest and a return to normal saltie traffic. Photo taken on October 03, 2004
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-22-2008

Dredging continues

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The Marine Tech crane barge Dean R. Smith has been dredging in and near the shipping lanes in the harbor since the spring. Lately, it has been stationed close by the Lift Bridge. On Monday afternoon, it was working hard dropping the clam shell down to the bottom (about 29 feet below) and lifting material up and into the scow that was tied to the crane barge (above). They work with 2 scows; filling one with material from the bottom, mostly sand, while the other is taken by the tug Callie M. to Erie Pier on the St. Louis River where it is emptied. They then return to the crane barge and exchange scows. Photo taken on August 19, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-21-2008

Alder getting closer to departing dry dock

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Yesterday, we had a picture of the Coast Guard cutter Alder taken from the stern as it sat on blocks on the bottom of the dry dock at Fraser Shipyards. On Tuesday morning, they started to fill the dry dock with water, a process that would take 4 or 5 hours. At a certain height, the water slowly lifted the ship off the blocks. In the picture above, taken from the bow, the ship is still resting on blocks as water fills the dry dock and would soon lift the ship off the bottom. You can see the gate behind the ship. It is holding back the water from the harbor, as it has since the Alder entered the dry dock. Sometime today, with the Alder side of the gate at the same water level as the harbor, the gate will be opened and the Alder will return to business. Photo taken on August 19, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-20-2008

Alder to depart dry dock

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Our Coast Guard cutter Alder spent most of the summer in the dry dock at Fraser Shipyards in Superior (above) for a 4-year inspection. While in dry dock, the vessel is supported on blocks. This morning workers at the shipyard will fill the dry dock with water. That will slowly refloat the Alder to the same level as the water just outside the dry dock. It will stay there for 24 hours for a final check and then the gates will be opened, probably on Wednesday. Commander Kevin Wirth will move his vessel out of the shipyard and into the open water of the harbor. Photo taken on August 18, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-19-2008

The Heron waits for the Callaway

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Monday afternoon, August 18th, 2008; the Cason J. Callaway had just departed Duluth while the research vessel Blue Heron was circling around to come in on the next lift of the Duluth Aerial Bridge.

Joseph H. Thompson has much history

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The tug-barge Joseph H. Thompson (seen above arriving in August, 2002) is due today with a load of limestone. This is the 12th trip here this season. It was one of the first boats of the season when it arrived on March 29th. The barge part is still most of the hull of a boat built in 1944 as the Marine Robin. It crossed the Atlantic several times during the war and was one of the many boats used in the Normandy invasion. In 1990, the vessel was turned into a barge when the stern and part of the hull were removed. A tug was built from the steel that was removed and was then inserted into a notch built into the back of the barge. Photo taken on July 02, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-18-2008

CSL Tadoussac late-day Duluth departure

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Sunrise would be (or was) a good time to watch some boat activity under the bridge. Two arrivals and a departure were expected. One early arrival, the CSL Tadoussac, seen above departing Duluth in July, 2002, should finish loading iron ore pellets and depart in the afternoon. It was here many times as the Tadoussac but in 2001, it was upgraded by Canada Steamship Lines and the company’s initials were attached to the boat’s name. During the upgrade, it was widened from 75 feet to 78 feet and the cargo self-unloading system was upgraded.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-17-2008

Presque Isle 1000 foot tug/barge combo

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Three thousand footers are due in port today to load coal. In an unusual event, they are spread out almost proportionately throughout the day. The Paul R. Tregurtha was expected just after midnight. It has been averaging about 10 hours in port on its 25 trips this season, meaning about 8 hours at the dock loading coal. It will leave late this morning, about the same time that the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. will be arriving to load coal. About 10 hours later, the American Century will be here for coal. Last week, there was a lot of waiting in line to load coal. Shipping companies like today’s efficiency much better than when their boats are sitting idle while they wait for a dock. One more thousand footer, the tug barge combination Presque Isle, will be here to load iron ore pellets. Above, it is approaching the Duluth ship canal last July. Photo taken on July 28, 2007
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-16-2008

Dredging the harbor is a no-win battle

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We haven’t had a lot of ship traffic coming under the bridge for a few days. No salties have been here for over a week, and a long line of boats over the weekend means they are now out dropping off their cargo before coming back here for more. Yesterday, we had two boats arrive in the early morning and leave late in the day, working just like the rest of us. Today, the James R. Barker and the Indiana Harbor will both arrive for work in the morning and leave later in the day. One thing doesn’t change. The Marine Tech crane barge has been lifting silt and sand off the harbor bottom close by the Lift Bridge. Lacking boat traffic, people have been watching the crane on the barge dredge the bottom of the harbor one clam shell scoop at a time. Photo taken on August 14, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-15-2008

Quebecois departing Duluth harbor

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The Quebecois came into port on Monday night with a cargo of cement for St. Lawrence Cement in Duluth. This is the boat’s 5th trip to the Twin Ports this season. On each, it has discharged cement. On the previous trips, it went to the BNSF Dock to load iron ore pellets after discharging cement. Today it will go up to Thunder Bay instead and load grain for a port probably on the St. Lawrence River. Above, it is departing Duluth in June, 2002.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-14-2008

Canadian Navigator arrives Twin Ports

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The Canadian Navigator was here 10 times in 1996 and waited until 2000 to come back again. It was not in the Twin Ports last year, but did come 3 times in each of the 2 years before that. It will be here today to load coal for Ontario Power Generation in Nanticoke. Built in 1967 in Great Britain for salt water work, it has been upgraded, sold and renamed several times. Now working in the Great Lakes, it became the Canadian Navigator in 1980. Above, it is coming into port on April 26th for the first of three trips in 2006. Photo taken on April 26, 2006
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-13-2008

Ryerson unusually arriving Duluth

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The Edward L. Ryerson will be coming into port by way of the Superior entry to pick up a load of iron ore pellets at the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) dock, just inside the entry. This will be the Ryerson’s 16th trip to the Twin Ports this season. Ten times it came in Superior and 5 times, it entered under the Lift Bridge. Above, it is entering the Duluth ship canal in November, 2006. It will come in the Duluth entry either to get fuel at the Murphy Fuel dock or if repairs are needed at Fraser Shipyards. It spent the winter at Fraser. Today, it is just here to pick up cargo, unless they run into a problem requiring work or they decide to get fuel.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-12-2008

Edwin H. Gott got the blues

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The Edwin H. Gott arrived under the Lift Bridge as Mike Zito was on stage leaning into his guitar at the Bayfront Blues Festival on Sunday afternoon. The Gott came in for some blues and some gas before loading up on iron ore pellets at the BNSF dock in Superior. Those will go to steel mills in Toledo. Photo taken on August 10,2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-11-2008

Callaway leaving Bluesfest behind

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Behind the trees, the cymbals and the Hoopsnakes, the Cason J. Callaway departed under the Lift Bridge on Saturday afternoon. The Blues Festival continues today but we are getting to the end of the long line of boats waiting to load coal at Midwest Energy Resources. The Algolake is probably gone by now and the American Century is due out later this afternoon. Photo taken on August 09, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-10-2008

Block departs with the blues

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The Joseph L. Block went under the Lift Bridge on Friday afternoon, on its way to Two Harbors to load iron ore pellets. At the same time, Shannon Curfman was in the middle of her set at the Bayfront Blues Festival (above). Both the Blues and the boats continue today, most of the boats will be here for coal; 4 thousand footers, all loading coal, will come under the Lift Bridge to back up the Blues at Bayfront. Photo taken on August 08, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-09-2008

Joseph L. Block passes the McCarthy

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The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. came under the Lift Bridge on Friday evening around 5 pm and went to the Murphy Fuel Dock to fill up before going over to Midwest Energy Resources to load coal. One half hour later, the Joseph L. Block came under the bridge to discharge limestone at the CN Dock just across the St. Louis River from Midwest Energy. After discharging limestone, it will get a partial load of iron ore pellets at the CN Dock and then go to the Two Harbors CN Dock to complete the load. Above, the Block is passing the McCarthy at the fuel dock, on its way to discharge limestone. Both boats are expected to depart the port today. Photo taken on August 07, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-08-2008

2008 Bayfront Blues Festival August 7-10, 2008

Anthony Gomes & the New Soul Cowboys

Friday, August 8, 2008
Centerville All Stars
Centerville All Stars
Shannon Curfman
Centerville All Stars
Centerville All Stars
Centerville All Stars
Shannon Curfman
Shannon Curfman
Shannon Curfman
Shannon Curfman
Shannon Curfman
Shannon Curfman
Shannon Curfman
Shannon Curfman
Shannon Curfman
Ruthie Foster
Ruthie Foster
Ruthie Foster
Ruthie Foster
Ruthie Foster
Ruthie Foster
Anthony Gomes & the New Soul Cowboys
Anthony Gomes & the New Soul Cowboys
Anthony Gomes & the New Soul Cowboys
Anthony Gomes & the New Soul Cowboys
Anthony Gomes & the New Soul Cowboys
Anthony Gomes & the New Soul Cowboys
Anthony Gomes & the New Soul Cowboys
Anthony Gomes & the New Soul Cowboys
Anthony Gomes & the New Soul Cowboys
2008Aug08_9318
2008Aug08_9319
Shemekia Copeland
Shemekia Copeland
Saturday, August 9, 2008
Big Walter Smith and the Groove Merchants
Big Walter Smith and the
Big Walter Smith and the
The Rusty Wright Band
The Rusty Wright Band
The Rusty Wright Band
The Rusty Wright Band
The Rusty Wright Band
The Hoopsnakes
The Hoopsnakes
The Hoopsnakes
The Hoopsnakes
The Hoopsnakes
The Hoopsnakes
The Hoopsnakes
The Hoopsnakes
Sunday, August 10, 2008
Davina and the Vagabonds
Davina and the Vagabonds
Davina and the Vagabonds
Davina and the Vagabonds
Davina and the Vagabonds
Davina and the Vagabonds
Davina and the Vagabonds
Davina and the Vagabonds
Davina and the Vagabonds
Davina and the Vagabonds
Davina and the Vagabonds
Davina and the Vagabonds
Davina and the Vagabonds
Mike Zito
Mike Zito
Mike Zito
Mike Zito
Mike Zito
Mike Zito

Daniella cargo now on trucks and train

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The Daniella departed Duluth on Monday after discharging 93 pieces of cargo destined for oil sands projects in Alberta and a refinery in Billings. All the Alberta cargo will go there by truck. The largest piece, a 405 ton reactor vessel, departed Duluth on Wednesday afternoon by train for Billings (above). Photo taken on August 06, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-07-2008

BBC Maine brought parts from Denmark

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On Monday evening, the gantry crane at the Port Terminal was being used to pull one of 11 wind turbine base units from the hold of the BBC Maine (above). They are slowly lowering the piece onto a truck where it will be taken to another part of the Port Terminal. It is the base unit for one of 11 almost complete sets of wind turbines built by Siemens and loaded into the BBC Maine at Aarhus, Denmark. There were no blades for the 11 wind turbines on this shipment. From here, all the wind turbine pieces will go by truck to a wind farm at Adair, Iowa, about half way between Des Moines and Omaha. Just below the base unit is the 405 ton reactor vessel that was discharged from the Daniella to a special rail car on Sunday. It was moved away from the platform last night and is about ready to be hooked to a locomotive for the trip to Billings, Montana. It will be the only car in the train. Photo taken on August 05, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-06-2008

Tall Ship Niagara still popular

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The tall ship Niagara is the only one left but it will be moving around a lot before leaving later this afternoon. It is expected to leave port, presumably under the Lift Bridge, around 9 am this morning for a day sail and return early this afternoon. It is then expected to depart for a final time later this afternoon. Above, it is departing for a day sail on Monday. There are still lots of people around to watch it. In between the Niagara’s comings and goings, the John B. Aird will come and then go with coal and the Pineglen will go, with taconite fines. Photo taken on August 04, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-05-2008

Daniella brought very heavy stuff

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The Jumbo Company’s Daniella, a heavy-lift vessel, was in town this past weekend although the tall ships got more attention. The Daniella was discharging very large pieces of equipment for several construction projects. The above piece, a 405 ton containment vessel loaded in Kobe, Japan, was taken off the ship on Sunday. It it being placed (above) onto a special double rail car that will shortly leave for a ConocoPhillips refinery project in Billings. It is a hydro treatment reactor, a pressurized vessel that, along with high temperatures and an added catalyst, can extract sulfur from crude oil, providing a cleaner end product. Carl Siroky, the project manager for ConocoPhillips in Billings, was in town overseeing the cargo transfer. He described it as an EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) regulation driven project. Photo taken on August 03, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-04-2008

Paul R. departing, with a nod to downtown

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On Saturday, all the attention was on the 3 tall ships. The Paul R. Tregurtha snuck out early in the morning (above) and then we waited until the afternoon for another thousand footer, the Indiana Harbor, to arrive. Today, the Indiana Harbor probably snuck out already, but the American Century has likely come in to take the Indiana Harbor’s place. All three loaded coal at Midwest Energy Resources. As the last people take a tour of the tall ships late this afternoon, the Kaye E. Barker should be coming under the Lift Bridge to load iron ore pellets. Photo taken on August 02, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-03-2008

Buffalo arrives on a beautiful Duluth day

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People in buggies and bikes were down at the ship canal on Friday to watch the boats come under the bridge. Commercial shipping had the bridge back while the 3 tall ships were at the DECC. The Buffalo came in late in the afternoon (above) to pick up a load of coal for Silver Bay. There are 3 salt water ships in port to start the new month off. The Daniella is discharging equipment for oil sands projects in Alberta, the BBC Maine is here waiting to discharge wind turbine pieces and the Marneborg is here, or departed early this morning, with beet pulp pellets. Photo taken on August 01, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-02-2008

Tall Ships greeted by huge crowd

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The big news on Thursday was the arrival of the three tall ships, the Pride of Baltimore II, the Niagara and the Madeline. Next in line in the big news department were the thousands of people who lined every inch of the ship canal and especially the prime location on the porch of the Marine Museum just in front of the Lift Bridge. The view of the people from the Pride of Baltimore II (above) was almost as exciting as the view of us from the porch. The Madeline was just in front of the Pride and the Niagara follow behind the Pride. Photo taken on July 31, 2008
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 08-01-2008