Archives for April 2008

Adam E. Cornelius leads Tregurtha into Duluth ship canal

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On April 19th, the Paul R. Tregurtha departed Duluth with a cargo of coal for Detroit Edison in St. Clair, Michigan. Two days later, the Adam E. Cornelius departed Duluth, heading for Buffalo with a cargo of wheat. In the picture above, taken yesterday, the Cornelius just beat the Tregurtha to the Duluth ship canal as both were returning from trips to Buffalo and Detroit. But the race was not so close since the Tregurtha had made another round trip to Detroit while the Cornelius was discharging wheat one Great Lake (Erie) further. The Tregurtha has probably already departed the port for Detroit with another cargo of coal. The Cornelius won’t get away until this evening. Coal is faster than wheat!
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 04-30-2008

Rebecca here for grain

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Five boats will be arriving in Duluth today. Three of them are expected to depart today also. The Rebecca is expected here to load grain and will be here several days. Last year, it was the first salt water ship of the season, coming into port on April 10th (above) with the help of the tug Minnesota on the stern and the North Dakota on the bow. Today, it is still only the second saltie of the season.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 04-29-2008

James R. Barker again for coal

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The James R. Barker came into port on Sunday evening (above) to load coal for a Detroit Edison power plant in St. Clair, Michigan. The boat called the St. Clair was named after the city since it was intended to deliver coal to that power plant. It still does but it goes to many other ports with a variety of cargos. Today it was set to load iron ore pellets in Two Harbors but it arrived in Duluth at 7:30 Sunday night. It is either getting fuel or repairs or their orders have been changed. The now Canadian flagged Robert S. Pierson will load iron ore pellets in Superior. It is the former US flagged Wolverine.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 04-28-2008

Vista Star, always a sign of spring

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The return of the Vista boats to their dock at the DECC is usually a sure sign of spring. The Vista Queen and Vista Star arrived there on Friday, signaling instead a last blast of winter. A new employee training session was planned in the harbor for Saturday but cold weather prevented the Minnesota Slip Bridge from opening, so they had the session on board the boat at the slip while it snowed outside (above).
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 04-27-2008

Presque Isle is one of many vessels coming into the port

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On this day last year, the 5th salt water ship of the season arrived in the Twin Ports. This year, the 2nd saltie is not expected until next week when three should be arriving. One of them, the BBC Zarate, will be bringing the first of many shipments of wind turbine parts this year, this one from Siemens in Denmark. Today 3 US flagged boats and 2 Canadian flags will be here. Three will load taconite and 2 will be loading iron ore pellets. Two will be taking cargo to Nanticoke, Ontario. The Canadian Olympic will load coal for Nanticoke while the Presque Isle will be taking iron ore pellets there. Above, the Presque Isle is seen coming into port last July 28th.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 04-26-2008

Roger Blough comes out of the fog

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The Roger Blough came in through the fog last night at 6:30 (above) to load iron ore pellets for Conneaut. The Cason J. Callaway is expected this evening. It made 18 trips to the Twin Ports last season, often bringing limestone here and then loading iron ore pellets, usually at Two Harbors. This will be its first trip of the season to the Twin Ports. It is bringing limestone loaded at Cedarville, Michigan and will then load iron ore pellets for the downbound cargo. Both boats are owned and operated by Great Lakes Fleet, located in Duluth.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 04-25-2008

Getting your TWIC card

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The Twin Ports are spread over two cities in two states. The people who operate the port work in a wide variety of occupations from stevedores and tug operators to guards and accountants. There are only two people who know everyone in the port. That would be Meredith Karasti (left) and Brenda Hennessey (right). They work for the Department of Homeland Security’s Transportation Worker Identification Credential Program, TWIC for short. Soon, anyone who works within, or needs access to, the port’s secure areas will need to have an id card, commonly called a TWIC card. Meredith and Brenda, both from Duluth, have been interviewing, finger printing and photographing those many, many people since late December. Above, they are working with Julie Danula (right), senior accounting analyst at Midwest Energy Resources in Superior.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 04-24-2008