Archives for April 2005

Dobrush here to load wheat for Italy

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The Ukraine flagged Dobrush, built in Shanghai, China in 1982, will be here today to load wheat for Italy. The ship has not been here since 2002, when it made two trips.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/30/2005

Mesabi Miner to load taconite

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The Mesabi Miner will be here loading taconite at the DM&IR Dock in West Duluth. The boat was named in honor of the men and women who have worked on the Mesabi Iron Range, the source for the taconite they are loading today.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/29/2005

Montrealais here with cement

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The Montrealais was here three times last year. It is here today for the first time this season, loading grain that will most likely be taken to the mouth of the St. Lawrence River. There it will be discharged and then loaded onto salt water ships for shipment to Europe or other international destinations. It is still powered by the original steam engine installed when it was built in 1962.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/28/2005

Cason J. Callaway expected here with limestone

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The Cason J. Callaway is expected in port today with a cargo of limestone loaded at Stoneport, Michigan. When completed, it will next go to Two Harbors to load taconite for a lower lakes port. The picture above shows it departing on August 28 last year.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/27/2005

The crew of the BBC Ontario

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Repairs to their ship have kept the crew of the BBC Ontario in port for longer than they planned. Captain Jorgen Melchiors had some time to gather most of his crew of 15 for a group picture. He is from Denmark, the chief engineer is from Myanmar, while the rest of the crew is from Russia, most of them from Kaliningrad.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/26/2005

Algoville here

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The Algoville (now the Tim S. Dool) will be here today loading grain. It usually makes 2 to 3 trips a year to the Twin Ports. It has sailed under the ownership of several companies with a variety of colors since it was first built in 1967. Algoma Central of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario bought her as the Senneville in 1994. They changed the boat’s name to Algoville at that time.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/25/2005

Atlantic Erie here to load coal for Nova Scotia

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The Canadian flagged Atlantic Erie will be here today loading coal for Sydney, Nova Scotia, a port on the Atlantic Ocean. The name Atlantic Erie reflects the vessel’s ability to work both in the Great Lakes and on the ocean. This vessel has been to many international ports. Most lakers that come here are not able to go out on the ocean.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/24/2005

Iryda here to load wheat for Spain

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The Polish owned and crewed Iryda is loading wheat for delivery to Spain. It was built in Japan in 1999 and, except for last year, has made one visit here each year since.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/23/2005

Calypso here for grain

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The Maltese flagged Calypso will be here today to load grain. It was here in 1997 when it was called the Hercegovina. As the Adimon, it was here twice in 1998, and once in each of the next four years. After three years away from the Twin Ports, it arrives today as the Calypso.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/22/2005

Three thousand footers today

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Three of the 13 thousand foot lakers on the Great Lakes will be coming to Duluth today. The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. will load coal, while the Mesabi Miner and the Edwin H. Gott will load taconite. The Edwin H. Gott (above) was named for the President of the United States Steel Company from 1967 to 1969.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/21/2005

Algolake here to discharge salt; then load coal

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The Canadian flagged Algolake will be here today to discharge a cargo of salt. After that, it will load about 30,000 tons of low sulfur coal for Ontario Power Generation in Nanticoke, Ontario.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/20/2005

Reserve here with limestone

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The Reserve (now the barge James L. Kuber) will be here today with limestone it loaded at Calcite, Michigan. After discharging that cargo, it will depart for Silver Bay to pick up a cargo of taconite for Cleveland, Ohio.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/19/2005

Federal Oshima here to load grain

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The Federal Oshima will be here today to load grain. Built in 1999 in Japan, it is 629 feet long, a little over 77 feet wide and bright red. It is built for easier passage through ice. The ship’s straight sides also enable it to carry packaged cargo.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/18/2005

EPA vessel Lake Guardian here today

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The research vessel Lake Guardian arrived yesterday on the first of two water sampling surveys it takes each year on the Great Lakes. The EPA operated vessel can support up to 27 scientists on board performing numerous scientific investigations relating to water quality.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/17/2005

Canadian Leader here loading grain

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The Canadian Leader (above) is here loading grain. Built in 1967, it was the last steam powered laker built for Great Lakes service. The BBC Ontario is at anchor waiting to come in to load grain. It may come in Sunday evening.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/16/2005

Paul R here to load coal

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The Paul R. Tregurtha, the largest boat working the Great Lakes at 1,013 feet and 6 inches long, will be here today to load 61,000 tons of taconite for a quick trip to Taconite Harbor. It will return here on Sunday to make the same load for the Detroit Edison power plant in St. Clair, Michigan.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/15/2005

Bavaria discharges wind turbine blades

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The first turbine blade is discharged from the Bavaria yesterday at the port terminal (above). Cranes from the ship slowly lowered the blades onto waiting trucks. The blades will next go to Canada for use on wind turbine towers (windmills). The Bavaria should finish up late this afternoon and will depart through the Duluth piers shortly thereafter.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/14/2005

Bavaria brings wind turbine blades

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The German flagged Bavaria always brings interesting cargo to Duluth. Today, it is windmill blades for Canada, although I am supposed to call them wind turbine blades.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/13/2005

Alpena is here today to discharge cement

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Built as the Leon Fraser in 1942, the Alpena is here today to discharge cement at the Lafarge Docks in Superior and Duluth. It is one of the oldest and prettiest boats working the Great Lakes, and has one of the best, and loudest, steam whistles on the Great Lakes too.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/12/2005

Utviken is first salt water ship

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The Utviken, built in 1984 in Spain, should be arriving late this morning. It will be the first salt water ship of the new shipping season to arrive in the Twin Ports, loading about 18,000 metric tons of wheat for Italy.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/11/2005

Utviken: First saltwater ship of 2005

Arrived: April 11, 2005 at 10:26 am
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With a 30 mph wind behind her, the Utviken arrived in port  on Monday, April 11, 2005 at 10:26:24 AM to load wheat at the Cargill Elevator in Duluth. She was the first saltwater ship of the season.
The winner of that year’s First ship contest guessed 10:30 a.m. only 4 minutes away from the actual time. The contest in 2005 drew about 2,000 entries from 17 states.
Click here for more about the Utviken.

Charles M. Beeghly arrives Duluth

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The Charles M. Beeghly (now Hon. James L. Oberstar ) is very similar to the John Sherwin, a boat that was taken out of service in 1981 and has been sitting in water close by the Blatnik Bridge since. The Sherwin was not converted to a self unloader. The Beeghly was converted to a self unloader in the same year, and as a result, is still operating on the Great Lakes. It should be here today to load taconite.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/10/2005

Armco here with limestone

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The Armco (now American Valor) was built in 1953 by the American Shipbuilding Company in Lorain, Ohio. It was named for the Armco Steel Corporation. Here only 4 times in 2003, it made 17 trips to the Twin Ports last year. On this trip it will first discharge a cargo of limestone and then load taconite for a lower lakes port.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/9/2005

Fresh paint for the Arthur M. Anderson

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The newly painted Arthur M. Anderson departed Duluth with a new coat of paint on March 25th (above). After taking taconite from Two Harbors to Conneaut, Ohio, and making a couple trips to ports in the lower lakes, it will be returning to Duluth today with a load of limestone.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/8/2005

Canadian Olympic anchors off Duluth piers

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The Canadian Olympic arrived outside the Duluth piers around 6 pm last night. It is here to load coal at Midwest Energy Resources in Superior. Since the Paul R. Tregurtha was already there and not expected to depart until midnight, the Canadian Olympic dropped anchor off the Duluth piers to wait. Since it usually is in port around 8 hours when loading coal, it should be departing Duluth today around breakfast time.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/7/2005

Paterson here; now the Pineglen

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The Pineglen will be here today to load grain. It visited here many times when it sailed as the Paterson. When the owner, Paterson & Sons of Thunder Bay, went out of the shipping business in 2002, it was sold to Canada Steamship Lines and renamed. Above, it is moving down the Duluth harbor last December, about to depart under the Lift Bridge.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/6/2005

Mesabi Miner will be here today

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The Mesabi Miner will be here today to load taconite. The boat was christened at the Port Terminal in Duluth in 1977. Muriel Humphrey broke a bottle of champagne over the bow and Senator Humphrey gave a speech. Thousands of red, white and blue balloons flew out of the boat’s cargo holds. This Sunday, either the Utviken or the BBC Ontario may be the first salt water ship of the season to arrive in port.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/5/2005

McCarthy and Columbia Star here today

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Two 1,000 footers will be arriving in Duluth today, both to load about 61,000 tons of coal at Midwest Energy. The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. probably arrived early this morning and should depart before noon today. The Columbia Star (above, now American Century) should arrive around noon and depart before midnight tonight. That assumes both follow their pattern of last year, averaging about 12 hours in port during each visit.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/4/2005

New Mackinaw launched

The ‘old’ Mackinaw was built in 1944 and was retired from active duty in the summer of 2006, after the ‘new’ Mac was launched and went through a long check-out after her launch on April 1st, 2005. I was there for that launch and as you will see, close enough that I was almost launched myself. I left footage after the launch on here. I was not aware the camera was still on. I, like others around me, were walking around in a daze. My video camera was unhurt; my regular camera got water logged but still worked. At the end of the video, you will see the last picture that camera took before we got wet. Just before that picture, you will see a discolored picture I took after the big splash. It is obviously water damaged but I dried it out and it was working fine.

Largest boat working the Great Lakes, the Paul R. Tregurtha will be here

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The Paul R. Tregurtha will be here today to load coal at Midwest Energy Resources in Superior. It will discharge all 61,000 tons of coal it loads here at the St. Clair power plant of Detroit Edison. The Tregurtha is the largest boat working the Great Lakes at 1,013 feet and 6 inches long and is a frequent visitor to the Twin Ports.
*submitted to the Duluth News Tribune for publication on 4/1/2005