New page for the J.A.W. Iglehart

jawiglehargcollageI have a web page for almost every vessel that has been to Duluth since 1996. Since the ice has stopped the regular flow of boats by my window, I have been updating some of those web pages. I have added and updated information on the J.A.W. Iglehart page and improved every image so you will be able to click on the image to see a much larger and better version. And don’t forget to click on the “Click here for other pages in DSN featuring news about the Iglehart” link.

Heritage Marine story in Professional Mariner

20130413_8316The current issue of Professional Mariner (December-January 2016) has a wonderful article on Michael Ojard and his company Heritage Marine, located in Knife River and providing tug service in the Port of Duluth Superior. At right is my picture of his tug Nels J. working in the ice on April 13, 2013.

Last vessel of the season

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The Paul R. Tregurtha made a beautiful entry into the Duluth harbor this morning at 9:23. It was her 46th and last visit of the season, as she was the last vessel to come under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge this season.
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Gott, Kaye E. Barker arrive for winter layup

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The Kaye E. Barker came in for winter layup at about 12:30 this afternoon (Friday, January 15, 2016). She will spend her winter at Fraser Shipyards. This was her 5th trip here this season; last year she was here 2 times. The Edwin H. Gott came in on January 14th for winter layup at the Port Authority (below). She was here 3 times this season, the same number of trips she made last year.
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Alder getting port ready to close down

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The Alder was out this morning (Wednesday, January 13, 2016), preparing a path for the last vessel traffic of the season. (see picture of harbor and the tracks the Alder laid  down at the bottom of this page)
Information from the Duluth Seaway Port Authority
Duluth-Superior shipping season winds to a close;
7 lakers to be in Port for winter layup
Duluth, Minn., U.S.A. (1/12/16) – The Port of Duluth-Superior is welcoming seven ships for winter layup this year. In fact, the Indiana Harbor laid up early (on Nov. 3) and a major repowering project is already underway at Fraser Shipyards on the Herbert C. Jackson, in dry dock since early December.
The Soo Locks (at Sault Ste. Marie) are set to close at midnight on Friday, Jan. 15. By then, four more wintering vessels are expected to have arrived in the Twin Ports beginning Thursday morning with the anticipated arrival of the Edwin H. Gott, followed Friday or later by the American Century, the Kaye E. Barker and the Philip R. Clarke. We say “expected” to arrive as transit times vary with wind and weather.
Boatwatchers will have to wait just a little longer for the arrival of the very last laker – the Paul R. Tregurtha – as the thousand-footer is making one or two late season, intra-lake deliveries of iron ore. Her arrival beneath the Aerial Bridge next week will officially mark the end of the 2015 Great Lakes shipping season here in the Twin Ports.  [Note: Last ‘saltie’ of the season, Federal Bering, departed Duluth on Dec. 18; the St. Lawrence Seaway closed on Dec. 31.]
In all, seven (7) Great Lakes freighters will be wintering in the Twin Ports this year:
Vessel Location ARRIVAL
Indiana Harbor Enbridge Dock 11/03/15
Herbert C. Jackson Fraser Shipyards 12/11/15
Kaye E. Barker Fraser Shipyards
Edwin H. Gott Port Terminal Berth 1
Philip R. Clarke Port Terminal Berth 4
American Century Port Terminal Berth 6/7
Paul R. Tregurtha Midwest Energy Resources Co.

While ships’ crews will take the next few, well-deserved weeks off, there is no real ‘down time’ on the waterfront. Hundreds of workers – engineers, welders, pipefitters, mechanics, electricians and others –will spend the next eight weeks doing heavy-duty maintenance and repair work so these vessels are ready to sail when the Soo Locks reopen on March 25 and the 2016 Great Lakes-Seaway shipping season gets underway.
The Jackson’s conversion is part of $110 million that U.S. vessel operators will spend on maintaining/modernizing ships during this offseason, according to Lake Carriers’ Association. Repairs and maintenance work will constitute $60 million of that total while the rest will be taken up by special project work, such as repowering or installing exhaust scrubbers.

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Mobile Bay follows Mackinaw into Duluth

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The US Coast Guard cutter Mobile Bay arrived Duluth this afternoon (January 9, 2016) around 12:30 and is now docked at the DECC (above). I just added pictures of the Mobile Bay while she was providing assistance at the launch of our Coast Guard cutter Alder back on February 7, 2004.

Mackinaw leaves her mark in Duluth

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After a couple days relaxing in the warm Duluth weather, Saturday  morning, January 9, 2016, woke up cold and getting colder so the Mackinaw went back to work, moving slowly down the Duluth harbor, past the ice fishing shacks and then turning up the Superior channel.
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Mackinaw joins our Arctic gull to celebrate winter

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The very rare-to-see in Duluth ivory gull has been here awhile instead of at her usual home on the ice in the Arctic Ocean. It is snowing and the temperature is about to take a nose dive. All that is left would be for the US Coast Guard cutter Mackinaw to make her arrival and that she did, this morning (Thursday, January 7, 2016) at 8:30. She is now docked behind the DECC.
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Shortly after arriving in Duluth, Commander Vasilios Tasikas gathered his crew to make sure they all knew what a nice place Duluth is. The ship and crew are here, in part, to familiarize new crew members with ports on Lake Superior. They will be here until Saturday morning, with at least one ski trip to Spirit Mountain planned. Note that Commander Tasikas is using a Duluth Shipping News calendar to make a point.
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Finally

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These two pictures of the Cornelia were taken by René Beauchamp this morning, Saturday, December 26, 2015 at Côte Ste.Catherine, just below Montreal, in the St. Lawrence Seaway. René reports she is currently (Saturday afternoon) docked at Montreal and is presumably ready to depart North American and move into the Atlantic Ocean, finally (for details about her adventures in Duluth, click here).
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Dick Bibby

20120601_2742Dick Bibby died yesterday (Sunday, December 20, 2015) at St. Luke’s Hospital in Duluth. Having suffered an aortic aneurysm, he recovered well enough to call for help and, by afternoon, was in the hospital, conscious and fairly alert (with the Vikings game on TV). But the prognosis was poor, and Dick eventually slipped away early evening. He was 93. Funeral services are being planned for after Christmas. Please keep Dick’s family and friends in your thoughts and prayers, particularly during this holiday season.

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It was not hard for USS Freedom executive officer Commander Kris Doyle (second from left), to impress four Duluth old timers with her brand new ship on Wednesday. While winding up the tour on the deck of the ship (above), Wes Harkins, at left, retired, Fraser Shipyard, showed Doyle a picture of the USS Paducah, a ship Wes left Duluth on in 1940. To Doyle’s left, Dick Bibby, retired, M.A. Hanna Co. and World War 2 merchant marine, Commander “Gil” Porter, retired US Coast Guard and former Great Lakes pilot and at right, Davis Helberg, former Duluth Seaway Port Authority director all agreed it was a new Navy. They asked all the old questions, but the answers from Doyle were all new. As an example, she explained how the ship can do 50 mph without a rudder or propeller. Think Jet Ski at a much higher level. Photo taken on October 29,2008
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Above, from the left: Robert Fuhrman, Executive Director Richard I. Bong World War II Heritage Center, Marvin Hall, Merchant Marine WWII, Floyd Miras, Deputy Director, Great Lakes Gateway, US Maritime Administration, Richard Bibby, Ken Johanson, Merchant Marine and former chief engineer, Paul R. Tregurtha, Richard Stewart, Director, Great Lakes Maritime Research
Institute.I took the picture above at the Richard I. Bong World War II Heritage Center in Superior on September 24th, 2008. The Great Lakes Maritime Research Institute was hosting an exhibit honoring World War II Merchant Marine Veterans. In the ceremony, Dick was actually the middle man in a quick transaction. He was given a set of Merchant Marine medals from the Second World War and his job was to turn and present the medals to Robert Fuhrman, Executive Director at the Bong.As in everything Dick does, this was done with his usual flare. The pictures, as you will note, will forever look as if Dick was giving the medals to the museum rather than just passing them over.Boats such as the Lee A. Tregurtha were vessels in the Merchant Marine as Dick Bibby was a mariner in the Merchant Marine. When the war was over, they were back to the normal work of moving cargos of all kinds from one port to another, in these two cases, eventually on the Great Lakes. And if we were to go to war again, boats and sailors on the Great Lakes would most likely be recruited into the Merchant Marine again.The Merchant Marine is always the same group of sailors and vessels with the same task, moving commercial goods from one port to another. The difference is in leadership. In peace time, it operates as we see it every day at the Duluth ship canal. During a war, the Merchant Marine becomes an auxiliary to the Navy and is available to transport cargo, equipment and soldiers in behalf of the war effort. I read that it took 7 to 15 tons of supplies to support one soldier for one year during a war. Providing that service is the job of the Merchant Marine.
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Late in 1999, Lower Lakes Towing purchased the John J. Boland, a boat that had been sitting in Fraser Shipyard for some years. In October, 2009, Captain John Wellington was hired to bring the tug Roger Stahl to Duluth to tow the newly purchased boat, to be called the Saginaw, to Sarnia. Wellington arrived on October 24, 1999. Wellington has a long history with Duluth so it was no surprise that Wes Harkins (left) and Dick Bibby (right) were down to greet Wellington (center) in the Roger Stahl pilot house. After arriving at Fraser Shipyard, Saginaw Captain Scott Bravener, also the President of Lower Lakes Towing, the company buying the boat, was down to talk with Wellington about the upcoming tow. Below, Bibby (an expert in all things related to tugs) consults with Bravener before the tow.
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Untitled-1The Port of Duluth quarterly magazine, North Star Port, has several articles that feature Mr. Bibby. Read about a visit to the Bibby basement. It was a trip back in history, his and ours (on page 23).
winter200809portmagA nice article by Davis Helberg from the Port of Duluth magazine of winter 2008-09 issue (Page 14)

Algoma Harvester makes 2nd trip to Twin Ports

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Denny Dushane was kind enough to send me some pictures he took of the Algoma Harvester, a new build that is expected to arrive here on Sunday, December 20, 2015 to load iron ore pellets at the Burlington Northern Santa Fe ore dock in Superior. He also provided the commentary below.
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The photos were taken of the Algoma Harvester in St. Clair, MI. on September 14, 2015 as she was upbound “light and in ballast.” They were coming from Trois Rivieres, Quebec after unloading a cargo of wheat from Thunder Bay, Ontario and were now returning and heading back up to Thunder Bay, Ontario to load another cargo of wheat this time for Baie Comeau, Quebec.

dushane09142015stclairiverIMG_6798 The Algoma Harvester is the 2nd Equinox class vessel built at the Nantong Mingde Heavy Industries shipyard in Nantong City, China. She follows the Algoma Equinox the 1st in the series delivered in late 2013 and the CWB Marquis delivered in late 2014.Algoma Harvester was christened on December 25, 2013 and departed the shipyard on May 18, 2014. After crossing the Pacific Ocean, the ship arrived at the Pacific Entrance of the Panama Canal on June 27 to anchor awaiting clearance. They cleared the anchorage on June 28 and transited the Panama Canal then. The Algoma Harvester after clearing the Panama Canal, arrived in Port Cartier, Quebec on July 11, 2014 to load its first official cargo which was iron ore pellets for Hamilton, Ontario.

dushane09142015stclairiverIMG_6797Later on, the Algoma Harvester arrived in Hamilton on July 15 where it was then officially christened in a Christening Ceremony at Pier 21 on July 17. After the Christening Ceremony, the ship immediately moved over to Pier 26 in Hamilton to unload its first cargo of iron ore pellets at the Arcelor Mittal/Dofasco Steel Dock.Its usual cargoes are wheat from Thunder Bay, Ontario to the St. Lawrence River ports and then backhauling iron ore pellets from either Port Cartier or Sept Isles, Quebec to Hamilton and then back up to Thunder Bay to load for the St. Lawrence.

Cornelia leaves Duluth, finally; winter arrives, finally

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Listen:
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Cornelia to depart on Friday morning (hopefully)

Three unique vessels found their way under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge in the last few days.

2015-1102-4797A ship we have all come to know, or at least observe at the anchorage just beyond the Duluth piers, is the Cornelia (right). After over 40 days out there, she came in last night to get fuel and take care of some maintenance issues.

The Coast Guard reports that they “have reached an agreement. The vessel is making preparations to depart the Great Lakes prior to the seasonal closure of the locks.”

She is expected to depart Duluth, under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge, late tomorrow morning or early afternoon. As with any departure time, it may be later. Duluthboats.com will have updated information as soon as we find any new information on Friday morning.

2015-1215-5242The brand new Federal Bering (right), built for Great Lakes service in Japan this year, came in Tuesday to load grain.

There used to be a Canadian flagged boat called the Manitoulin. It is no longer in existence but a brand new (again) Manitoulin arrived in port last night. She was built in China where they combined the stern of a chemical tanker called Lalandia Swan with a brand new self-unloading bow section. She is here loading iron ore pellets at the CN dock in West Duluth (below).

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After 6 weeks at anchor, the Cornelia came in this afternoon

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… at 3:55 this afternoon (December 16, 2015). With the assistance of the Great Lakes tug Kentucky on her stern and the Arkansas at the bow, the Cornelia moved over to get some fuel. She will likely remain in port tonight and depart sometime tomorrow.
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Click here for other posts on Duluth Shipping News regarding the trials and tribulations of the Cornelia.

Brand new ship with the Port’s last cargo

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2015-1214-5233Other than the fact that it was too dark and I only caught the last half of the ship, I was happy to get this shot of the Federal Bering coming under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge last night (December 14, 2015) at 11 pm after a day or so at anchor in the Apostle Islands waiting for high winds to diminish. She then went over to CHS 2 in Superior to load the Port’s last cargo of grain on a salt water ship, a split load of wheat and canola that she will take to Mexico, leaving later this week. I said load and not left with the last cargo of grain since, as I write this, the Cornelia is still at anchor with her cargo of grain that she loaded at CHS 1 about  40 days ago. Winter may never get here but the Soo Locks will close on January 15, but of more importance to the Cornelia, the Welland Canal will close on December 26th and the rest of the Seaway by December 30th. Still don’t know what will become of her and her cargo, but I suppose she could become the last cargo on a salt water ship to depart, unless of course that award requires the cargo and ship to depart under the Lift Bridge and not from the anchorage. Laughing out loud

Algosteel brings salt to Duluth

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The Algosteel arrived Duluth this morning at 10 am with salt she is discharging at the North American Salt Dock. I took the picture above and just below from my balcony which provides me with a good view but for some tree issues. In the warm months, I have leaves on the left and right that frame my pictures of the bridge from the balcony. In the winter, the leaves fall away and the “world’s largest Christmas tree” rises,  just about the time the last leaves have left the scene. They take it down January, sometimes in time for me to get at least one picture of a boat arriving before the season closes down. Not that I am complaining!
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Above, I have moved down to my office in Canal Park to get a picture of her as she is slowly moving into the Salt Dock. Above her in the picture, left to right, you see the General Mills A mill, the old Lafarge cement silos, the rapidly rising PierB resort, the Paulucci Pavilion and the Great Lakes Aquarium.
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This is the second trip here for the Algosteel this season; she was here on May 31 loading iron ore pellets at the BN in Superior. Last season, she made 7 trips here, bringing salt twice and loading iron ore pellets at both the CN dock in Duluth and the BN in Superior.

Neighbors to the North

… and some of our own neighbors in this country

Caution; the video above will keep running other videos unless you stop it.

A page from the past: April 12, 2004

Lithuanian national anthem celebrates 1st ship of the year

A Lithuanian couple from Wisconsin came up to Duluth on April 12, 2004 to visit the first saltie of the year, the Lithuanian flagged Kapitonas Andzejauskas. Mrs. Tribys told us her husband would sing the Lithuanian national anthem for us and he did! Click here for more on the song and here for more information on the ship.

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Coast Guard information on the Cornelia

More pictures of the Cornelia
Date: Dec 3, 2015: Ninth Coast Guard District provides the following information regarding the Cornelia
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Cornelia Motor vessel Cornelia investigation continues

CLEVELAND — The Coast Guard continues investigating an ocean-going freighter, currently at anchor in Duluth, Minnesota, for alleged violations of U.S. law.

The Coast Guard is investigating the crew, equipment and records of the Liberian-flagged motor vessel Cornelia for allegations involving violations related to the discharge of oily water.

Based upon current information in the investigation, it does not appear that the discharge occurred within the port of Duluth – Superior.

Although the Cornelia and crew are typically equipped to remain at sea for several months, Coast Guard personnel continue to check in with the master of the Cornelia regularly, who confirms the crew has adequate food, water and other necessities.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Minnesota accepted the case for criminal investigation November 9. The Coast Guard and the vessel’s owner and operator are negotiating a security agreement that would permit the vessel to depart the port while simultaneously protecting the integrity of the investigation and the interests of the vessel’s crew members.

The Coast Guard and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Minnesota take any allegations involving environmental pollution very seriously. At the same time, both agencies recognize the importance of the flow of commerce through the port of Duluth – Superior and are making every effort to complete our investigation as soon as possible.

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Date: Dec 3, 2015

Ninth Coast Guard District

Tim and Lee brighten up a dull day

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The Lee A. Tregurtha arrived Duluth this afternoon (November 30, 2015) at 2:00 (above). It was her 16th trip here this season; she made 22 trips last year. She loaded iron ore pellets at the CN Dock in West Duluth on most of her trips this season. She loaded pellets at the BN dock once, on May 15. Twice she brought limestone in before going to CN and at least once went to Silver Bay to load pellets. Below, the Tim S. Dool departed a half hour later after discharging cement at the Holcim dock, a task she accomplished on 8 other trips this season. She was here to load iron ore pellets twice this season, once at BN and once at CN in Duluth.
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More salt for Duluth

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The Algoma Enterprise has been discharging salt at the North American Salt Dock for the last two days; she is expected to complete the discharge later this evening. In the old days, until about 2008, the Algoma Enterprise, then the Canadian Enterprise, loaded coal at Midwest Energy Resources in Superior and carried it to the Ontario Power Generator in Nanticoke, Ontario. She and her sister boat, now the Algoma Transport, then the Canadian Transport, averaged around 25 trips a year on that route. Trading routes can change as often as a boat’s name; in this case, the Nanticoke plant began using nuclear power to generate electricity. Since 2009, we see the Algoma Enterprise only about 5 times a year.

Nothing new now, but I have a scoop from long ago

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In the old days, I was sometimes a good source for information about the port. Sometimes I even knew stuff I wasn’t supposed to talk about. Other times, I could and that was fun. Nowadays, I read the paper to find out about the exciting stuff; well not yet so exiting. The Duluth News Tribune had a picture of the Cornelia at anchor off the Duluth piers on their front page this morning (November 7, 2015). The above is the picture I took this morning. There was big news but the News Tribune didn’t know what the news was. I was happy to find out from them that there was news. I still don’t know why she is out there either. I refer you to the article for the list of people who will not tell them (us) what is going on. The US Attorney says the ship is being held there (by the Coast Guard, I assume) as a part of a federal probe.

Hmmm.

Many years ago, when I was better connected (before 9-11), I found out a ship was coming to Duluth under armed guard. I got a ride out to the ship at anchor and was lucky enough to come in with her later in the day.

She had many other names before she was decommissioned in 2011.

Radnik: 1984-1996
Grant Carrier: 1996-2001
Chios Sailor: 2001-2007
Elpida: 2007-2009
Chios Voyager: 2009-2011
Kai Shun: 2011 until decommissioned

Read below to find out about that adventure.

On July 5 the Grant Carrier and her crew of 27 left Odessa, a Ukrainian city on the Black Sea, on their way to Duluth. No ship with Yugoslavian officers was allowed in U.S. waters unless accompanied by armed guards, supplied by the Coast Guard and paid for by the shipowner. (Our planes were bombing their cities at the time.)
So the Grant Carrier came to Duluth on August 17, 1999 with a contingent of five armed (but friendly) Coast Guard sailors. The officers and crew were indeed from Yugoslavia, many from Kotor, a city on the coast of the Adriatic Sea in Montenegro.

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The ship arrived and dropped anchor and waited for a party of local port officials to come out. I went out with them and took a gamble and asked the captain if I could stay aboard until the ship came in later that afternoon. (The gamble being the possibility that plans would change and the ship would stay at anchor, perhaps for days. There is no regularly scheduled transportation between the Duluth shore and a ship at anchor.)

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We came in under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge late that afternoon, as promised. Both the Coast Guard and the captain and crew were out waving to the crowd, none of whom had any idea the guys in blue outfits were wearing pistols and guarding the ship.

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As soon as we docked, the Coast Guard left the ship for more private quarters in a local hotel, glad to be back on American soil.

The officers and crew were just as interested in getting off the ship to see the sights in Duluth. The next evening, I was walking down Lake Avenue in Canal Park with Captain Radovic and First Mate Pajovic when we passed Grandma’s Sport’s Garden. Both men started to wave at someone playing pool inside. As we walked on, I asked whom they could possibly know in Duluth. Answer: their friendly Coast Guard ‘protectors’ were taking a break playing a few games of pool. I of course set aside the thought that they might be following us, although the captain did tell me that he had also run into them the night before.

On the evening the ship left Duluth, I went aboard with an armful of Port Authority coffee cups and passed them out to the crew. Some crewmembers left our deck party immediately but returned within minutes with gifts for me. They started with cigarettes and lighters, even though I insisted I didn’t smoke. I quickly realized that it was the thought that counts in these matters.

Others came back with beautiful maps of the area around Kotor. Kotor is a medieval city, and the pictures clearly showed the remains of the wall built centuries ago to protect the city from invaders. As we sat on the deck in Duluth, five of them pointed to houses in the pictures where they live, or once lived. They were so insistent on making sure I knew that they were nice, peace-loving people, as were the people of Montenegro, that I almost could not get off the ship. I was surely convinced, as I walked down the gangway to drive back to the ship canal.

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Old salts tell me the Grant Carrier was the first ship ever to come into Duluth under armed guard, and I had the scoop. I went up and down the piers passing out the Duluth Shipping News and telling people that the ship with the armed guards was coming soon. The crew was hyped, and I had suggested to the captain that he do some serious work with the ship’s whistle when they came under the bridge.

I was still not prepared for what happened. As the ship came around the buoy and approached the bridge, the entire crew was out on the deck, and not just standing there. They were all jumping up and down and waving. The captain hit the horn just before the ship went under the bridge, and he didn’t take his hand off until the ship was leaving the canal.

Those of us on the ground returned the jumping and the noise to the ship; it was quite a moment. I felt we had all made a small contribution to a better world given that our two countries were at war.

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Cornelia waiting

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The Cornelia has been at anchor off the Duluth piers for several days, waiting to come in to load grain at CHS. This is her second trip here this year; she was here in May to load grain at Riverland Ag, formerly Cargill. On previous trips in December, 2012 and November, 2013, she discharged clay at the Port Terminal before loading grain.

Two salties made their first visit to Twin Ports today

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The Brant arrived at 10:55 this morning (October 19, 2015) to load grain. An hour later, the BBC Kimberley came in to load wind turbine parts.
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A walk in the woods, overlooking the harbor

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Pictures taken on October 16, 2015 on a just opened part of the Superior Hiking Trail.
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It is a new trail that goes below the Skyline Parkway, below Enger Tower and the Enger Park Golf course
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Note the mountain  bikers coming toward me; I saw a couple more of them, some runners and no bears.
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Above, one of several new bridge/walkways on the new trail. Below is a bridge across Coffee Creek. I have found Coffee Creek in several places now as it winds down the hillside and into the St. Louis River.
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